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Old 09-24-2017, 07:07 AM
 
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Hi,

I have complete shaded areas where we don't get sun and also shadded area (under trees) where we get partial sun. Looking for some suggestions on which evergreen floral shrubs are good for these two areas. Thanks.
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Old 09-24-2017, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,601 posts, read 1,040,939 times
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I'll give you some suggestions:

For needle type bushes, many yews (Taxus) will work.

For broadleaf evergreens, Aucuba (gold dust plant) would be very good. Hollies would also work. Euonymous has evergreen types and are very easy to grow. Nandina would work, but might get leggy for lack of sun. Vinca minor and english holly are both evergreen and would be good vines and/or groundcover. Glossy abelia is very attractive--many varieties, but it might not flower well in deep shade.

Others will probably suggest other plants I haven't mentioned.
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Old 09-26-2017, 02:33 PM
 
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These laurels require partially sunny( like in woodland)

Prunus lusitanica Portugal laurel 6
Prunus caroliana Carolina laurel 7b
Prunus laurocerasus cherry laurel English

This website has some interesting evergreen shrub. Not sure how they do in shade
Distinctive shrubs for Japanese gardens | Japanese garden
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Old 09-26-2017, 02:39 PM
 
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Tea olives work well in shade. They have small white, fragrant flowers this time of year and attractive shiny green foliage.
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Old 09-27-2017, 08:18 PM
 
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Thank you all.
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Old 09-28-2017, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,368 posts, read 8,777,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Patsu View Post
Thank you all.
Do you have any problems with deer? If you do; I would try to stay away from the Yews, Laurel, and Rhododendron.

The best shrubs for deer are English Boxwood (not all Boxwood varieties) and Japanese Andromeda. The English Holly usually only have problems with some new growth nipped. All of these are hardy enough for your Zone 7.
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Old 09-29-2017, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Virginia
2,617 posts, read 1,041,740 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracy5305 View Post
Tea olives work well in shade. They have small white, fragrant flowers this time of year and attractive shiny green foliage.
I didn't know tea olives grew in shade. Mine are planted in full sun and holy cow have they taken off! They're now over 8 ft. tall (after 2 years.) and going like gangbusters!
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Old 11-05-2017, 05:48 PM
Status: "Super Junior's 12th Anniversary!" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,417 posts, read 12,534,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Do you have any problems with deer? If you do; I would try to stay away from the Yews, Laurel, and Rhododendron.

The best shrubs for deer are English Boxwood (not all Boxwood varieties) and Japanese Andromeda. The English Holly usually only have problems with some new growth nipped. All of these are hardy enough for your Zone 7.
LOL of course I've planted these, but I second that emotion. My recommendations are:
cold hardy gardenia*
sarcococca (dry shade Ok)*
Cold hardy camellia
evergreen azalea (see if your local rhododendron society chapter has recommended any)
Christmas fern (OK not a shrub, but fab, structural and evergreen...well-drained soil)
fargesia rufa
Maryland Dwarf Holly
Evergreen viburnum (new to me this year, but OK in shade...Prague etc.)

*=not personally tried.
REPS to the poster who listed aucuba japonica. Did this plant fall out of favor or something? Nothing came up when I searched for dry shade evergreens, but this is apparently one of the best plants for dry shade. Away from deer.
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Old 11-05-2017, 06:05 PM
 
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'kinkytoes' introduced a valid concern - are the areas 'dry'? Are the areas shaded by trees (which will suck up lots of water?) Also, what size shrub are you looking for? Plus, in what state do you live (zone may not provide enough information)?

I always suggest looking at native plants (they are 'guaranteed' by Mother Nature to be appropriate for your area). Also, look at an invasive species list for your area and avoid those plants.
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Old 11-05-2017, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
10,368 posts, read 8,777,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
'kinkytoes' introduced a valid concern - are the areas 'dry'? Are the areas shaded by trees (which will suck up lots of water?) Also, what size shrub are you looking for? Plus, in what state do you live (zone may not provide enough information)?

I always suggest looking at native plants (they are 'guaranteed' by Mother Nature to be appropriate for your area). Also, look at an invasive species list for your area and avoid those plants.
Mother Nature does not always 'guarantee' everything. At least when it comes to deer and native plants like Rhododendron and Mountain Laurel. Yes, they will survive; if the deer will allow them to grow over five feet tall. You can see many of these plants in deer infested areas that have no lower leaves; all have been nipped off. Unless you 'cage' these plants when young; many will not survive to maturity.

I do agree with you on invasive species - avoid these plants.
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