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Old 10-30-2017, 11:58 AM
 
1,588 posts, read 3,085,166 times
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If this 'study' is anything like the ones the 'scientists' did for global warming then, I suspect it is not to be believed.
Populations rise and fall and I have not noticed a decline in any of our insects. We still get huge amounts of bees, ants, butterflies and spiders. Earwigs, moths, silverfish, ladybugs and on and on.
And, more than a few neighbors have had to tent for termites.


Nope, another manufactured crises.
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Old 10-30-2017, 12:06 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
4,316 posts, read 4,671,862 times
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This year in my location there has been a noticeable decrease of insects of all kinds. I can't claim to know the reason why (I suspect it is weather/climate change related) but I'm pretty sure it's not because of anyone spraying pesticides in this environmentally friendly neck of the woods. Use of pesticides and other pollutants is strongly discouraged and not a common practice here, otherwise there would be a general uprising of the populace and bloody hell to pay if that happened.

I do think the decrease in insects is probably because of the way the climate is changing. The changes are so undeniably obvious now, going back and forth from one extreme to another, it's like mother nature is wearing brass knuckles and jumping up and punching you in the face over and over and over.

One thing for sure that has not changed - it's that time of year when the ladybugs are swarming together and hanging out on the sunny sides of buildings. The outside of my residence is crawling with them this week and a few have managed to sneak inside. There are thousands of them out there but still nowhere near as many as there usually is at this time of year when they're swarming.

.
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Old 10-30-2017, 12:41 PM
 
6,708 posts, read 8,086,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIcenter View Post
It was not a spectacular year here for milkweeds. Many developed rust early on, and never really became mature plants. On the other hand Common milkweed exploded this year. I have to say though, the total butterfly count was huge this year. And Clearwings were everywhere, which I'm hoping is from the many different types of Viburnum I've been planting.


There are always a zillion viburnums in play here and I never saw a single, solitary clearwing. That's good to hear!
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Old 10-30-2017, 12:41 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
13,066 posts, read 14,390,754 times
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I think the damage done to insect populations needs immediate attention and study so that it can be reversed. As mentioned in the article, insects are vital not only to human survival (vis-s-vis their role in enabling our immense need for pollination of food crops) but also to just about every ecosystem and thus every organism on earth. The importance of healthy insect populations cannot be underplayed.

However, I have to say that the topic title, World Insect Population Down 75%, is grossly misleading.

According to the article cited in post #1:

"The study, published on Wednesday in peer-reviewed journal PLOS One has found that, in German nature reserves, flying insect populations have declined by more than 75% over the duration of the 27-year study."

This is a very shocking sign, I agree, since one can easily extrapolate that a consistent measurable decline in insect populations in any given habitat, whether nature reserves, farmer's fields, suburbs, managed woodlands, cities, etc. would be paralleled in other nearby habitats.

But the article does not compare the insect populations in habitats adjacent to or regionally associated with the nature reserves that were studied, much less the state of insect populations outside of Germany. The possible vectors for a decline in insect populations could be related to habitat loss, local weather conditions, increase in localized predator populations, human impact such as the use of pesticides or other chemical pollutants that affect the life cycle of insects, and other factors.

We need to have more data on insect populations in other countries, much as has been done with bee populations in North America and elsewhere to see if this pattern as observed at sites in Germany is truly a worldwide phenomenon, and whether is is related to conditions that can be reversed.

Last edited by ABQConvict; 10-30-2017 at 01:12 PM..
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Old 10-30-2017, 12:42 PM
 
6,708 posts, read 8,086,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Trails View Post
If this 'study' is anything like the ones the 'scientists' did for global warming then, I suspect it is not to be believed.
Populations rise and fall and I have not noticed a decline in any of our insects. We still get huge amounts of bees, ants, butterflies and spiders. Earwigs, moths, silverfish, ladybugs and on and on.
And, more than a few neighbors have had to tent for termites.


Nope, another manufactured crises.


A manufactured 75% drop in all insect species? Not likely. One or two, maybe -- you'll often notice that it's a lousy year for one or two specific species -- but all of them?
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Old 10-30-2017, 01:41 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
18,480 posts, read 21,372,641 times
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So, who counted the bugs? There are plenty of bugs around here and some of the pests like mosquitoes are out of controll.

I haven't noticed any shortage of tomato horn worms, coddling moth, or earwigs. I've got about the same number of butterflies and moths as usual. Pine beetles are thriving with destruction going full bore (literally)

There were fewer grasshoppers this year, but they are cyclical and I'm fine with fewer grasshoppers.

No fleas here but I'm hearing complaints about high flea numbers from other parts of the country. Bedbugs are a new plague.

So, who is it that has counted bugs and came up with a 75% reduction in their population?
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Old 10-30-2017, 03:13 PM
 
6,708 posts, read 8,086,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
So, who counted the bugs? There are plenty of bugs around here and some of the pests like mosquitoes are out of controll.

I haven't noticed any shortage of tomato horn worms, coddling moth, or earwigs. I've got about the same number of butterflies and moths as usual. Pine beetles are thriving with destruction going full bore (literally)

There were fewer grasshoppers this year, but they are cyclical and I'm fine with fewer grasshoppers.

No fleas here but I'm hearing complaints about high flea numbers from other parts of the country. Bedbugs are a new plague.

So, who is it that has counted bugs and came up with a 75% reduction in their population?


The story started with a German study in their nature preserves and was soon echoed by other studies from all over the world that didn't get publicized before.
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Old 10-30-2017, 11:35 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...
37,364 posts, read 40,944,844 times
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Global warming: Al Gore said it, it must be true.
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Old 10-31-2017, 01:06 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
4,316 posts, read 4,671,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Global warming: Al Gore said it, it must be true.

I've noticed that many Americans mention Al Gore an awful lot, almost obsessively. Pardon me for asking, but is Gore some kind of extremely important American person that everyone else in the world who is experiencing climate change is supposed to know about or be familiar with? I'd really like to know, is there some reason why I should care who he is or what he says about climate change or global warming where I live, or in other countries where other non-American people live?

.
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Old 10-31-2017, 01:25 AM
 
4,209 posts, read 7,774,643 times
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Al Gore was Vice President under Bill Clinton. Gore is famous for inventing the Internet and for his movie, 'An Inconvenient Truth'. Gore is also infamous for releasing his Chakra, hopefully not on plants like Weinstein.
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