U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 11-27-2017, 02:22 PM
 
681 posts, read 510,746 times
Reputation: 1210

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Creekcat View Post
The squirrels seem to have no problem with getting them started.
This. Find a few big walnuts hanging over the road. Fill buckets with them then dump them out in piles where you want them planted. Then let the squirrels plant them for you. Squirrels forget, get munched up or run over before they return to at least 50% of the walnuts they bury.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 04:10 PM
 
1,581 posts, read 461,454 times
Reputation: 3476
Regarding the pecans...don't you need a male and a female tree? Am I talking stupid? lol
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 05:58 PM
 
4,772 posts, read 4,392,447 times
Reputation: 6033
Squirrels do not plant nuts too far from mother trees, 100 feet at most. I planted an acre or so of the black walnut seedlings I planted a year before. I would say planting nuts in a permanent location is much easier, but it is all about soil at that location, some areas at my place have soil that even black walnuts do not like it is so worn out/eroded. And then come weeds, planting nuts in the ground and forgetting about them guarantees success rates of a squirrel as far as tree propagation i.e. one needs to plant enormous quanitities of nuts. If nut supplies are limited it makes sense to plant those nuts in a well tended plot and replant next year while paying special attention to weed protection, even though a healthy walnut seedling in a good location can survive quite a bit of shade. But healthy plant+good soil is a rare combo at my place so weed protection/soil ammending is a must. My favorite is replanting squirrel planted walnuts with all the soil at a root base intact, but there are not that many survivors like that. This year I try planting nuts is a permanent marked location to be weed protected/fertilized if sprouted. Marking a spot is absolutely essential, I mowed quite a few unmarked/hard to spot seedlings. Deer etc. do not feed on black walnuts but they still can move down seedlings out of spite I guess, bite off and spit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 06:19 PM
 
4,772 posts, read 4,392,447 times
Reputation: 6033
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron61 View Post
Not only that, but black walnut will be even more valuable in the future as more and more large trees are harvested. As another thought, due to the deforestation of tropical hardwood forests, guitar makers (think Martin and Taylor) wil need huge quantities of substitute tone woods to replace mahogany and rosewood. There will be an incredible market for black walnut as it is already becoming a favorite of guitar builders.
I would love to be able to plant 10-20 acres of black walnut and leave it to the next generation to reap the benefits from.
Black walnut can be the next ash of the midwest. Its future is uncertain. http://greatlakesecho.org/2011/11/30...eps-across-us/
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 11:35 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,094 posts, read 44,297,935 times
Reputation: 15123
We have a friend who starts walnuts using option #2. She transplants them once they are between 2 and 4 foot tall. It works great for her. She might only get one tree from every ten nuts that she plants though.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 03:51 PM
 
21,122 posts, read 15,566,606 times
Reputation: 11074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pfalz View Post
This. Find a few big walnuts hanging over the road. Fill buckets with them then dump them out in piles where you want them planted. Then let the squirrels plant them for you. Squirrels forget, get munched up or run over before they return to at least 50% of the walnuts they bury.
i considered this; and actually, some of the ones that squirrels nabbed from the bed of my truck will probably end up planted that way. but I'd prefer to have some control over where they end up planted - the could very well end up in my neighbor's yard, for instance.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sassybluesy View Post
Regarding the pecans...don't you need a male and a female tree? Am I talking stupid? lol
not stupid at all. both pecan and walnut are self-fertile but the timing of pollen production vs. receptivity of the female flowers usually doesn't work out, so more than two trees is highly recommended. however, i picked up a lot of the nuts that i plan to plan under a lone (as far as i know) tree with walnut trees visible anywhere nearby, so there is that to consider..

Quote:
Originally Posted by RememberMee View Post
Black walnut can be the next ash of the midwest. Its future is uncertain. http://greatlakesecho.org/2011/11/30...eps-across-us/
yeah, that is a bad one, thanks for mentioning that. i was actually somewhat involved in confirming the first case of that disease in Colorado. luckily it hasn't reached the mid atlantic (yet ).

Quote:
Originally Posted by RememberMee View Post
Squirrels do not plant nuts too far from mother trees, 100 feet at most. I planted an acre or so of the black walnut seedlings I planted a year before. I would say planting nuts in a permanent location is much easier, but it is all about soil at that location, some areas at my place have soil that even black walnuts do not like it is so worn out/eroded. And then come weeds, planting nuts in the ground and forgetting about them guarantees success rates of a squirrel as far as tree propagation i.e. one needs to plant enormous quanitities of nuts. If nut supplies are limited it makes sense to plant those nuts in a well tended plot and replant next year while paying special attention to weed protection, even though a healthy walnut seedling in a good location can survive quite a bit of shade. But healthy plant+good soil is a rare combo at my place so weed protection/soil ammending is a must. My favorite is replanting squirrel planted walnuts with all the soil at a root base intact, but there are not that many survivors like that. This year I try planting nuts is a permanent marked location to be weed protected/fertilized if sprouted. Marking a spot is absolutely essential, I mowed quite a few unmarked/hard to spot seedlings. Deer etc. do not feed on black walnuts but they still can move down seedlings out of spite I guess, bite off and spit.
some good points, thanks. i do need to remember to mark where i put these, or i can definitely see potentially mowing some down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
We have a friend who starts walnuts using option #2. She transplants them once they are between 2 and 4 foot tall. It works great for her. She might only get one tree from every ten nuts that she plants though.
after a cracking a few open, i can believe it. it seems like a lot of black walnuts have not goody inside. imagine being a squirrel and chewing at that insanely tough shell for 15 minutes, only to find a dud.

a few years back i watched some goofy reality show where a couple of guys magically transformed a small sack full of black walnuts into a used motorcycle; the premise went like this.

they offered to pick up all then nuts off some woman's lawn so she could mow it, if they could keep the nuts. they ended up with about half a grocery sackful. the next thing you know, they had supposedly shelled the walnuts, squeezed the oil out, ended up with 3 mason jars full of precious walnut oil (lol!), which they traded for a used motorcycle.
i had to laugh
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top