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Old 11-09-2017, 05:10 PM
 
363 posts, read 118,706 times
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I live in the North East in zone 7, until recently, .....now it has been changed to zone 7a. I tried to find out what the little a means, but not luck.........does any one knows? Thank you,
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Old 11-09-2017, 06:18 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Zone 7a Vegetable Planting | Garden Guides


Quote:


The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Plant Hardiness Zone 7 stretches across the United States from coastal New England to Oregon and Washington. It dips as far south as Arkansas, Texas and New Mexico. It is divided into two subzones, 7a and 7b. Average minimum temperatures in 7a are from 0 degrees Fahrenheit to 5 F, while 7b sees 5 F to 10 F. Bear in mind that these are average minimum temperatures, so it is possible to get lower temperatures occasionally.
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Old 11-09-2017, 07:11 PM
 
Location: NC
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Zone 7 would include both 7a and 7b. 7a plants might be tender in 7b, meaning they might not do well unless protected or on the south side of the building in the winter. Most of the plants in zone 7 might do well in 7a but a few will freeze in colder years unless they are in 7b. All 7a plants will do well in 7b, but not vice versa. Of course, these zones are not cut and dried either, and in warm years plants will be a little safer than in colder than normal winters.
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Old 11-11-2017, 08:37 AM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
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i think you won't notice much difference other than the fact that it will be slightly warmer on the coldest days.

the zone rating tell you what the average minimum temp might be. higher numbers represent warmer minimum temp.
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Old 11-11-2017, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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The UDA hardiness zones cover a 10-degree span - i.e., Zone 7 plants are hardy from between 0 and 10 degree F. The a and b denote a 5-degree subdivision - 7a is plants hardy from 0-5 degrees and 7b denotes plants hardy from 5-10 degrees.

The higher the number and letter combination, the warmer the zone is.

http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/
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Old 11-14-2017, 08:31 PM
 
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Until recently. Where is recently? Philly is 7A. Parts of NC are 7B. There's a big difference between the two.
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,695 posts, read 1,063,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
Zone 7 would include both 7a and 7b. 7a plants might be tender in 7b, meaning they might not do well unless protected or on the south side of the building in the winter. Most of the plants in zone 7 might do well in 7a but a few will freeze in colder years unless they are in 7b. All 7a plants will do well in 7b, but not vice versa. Of course, these zones are not cut and dried either, and in warm years plants will be a little safer than in colder than normal winters.
No, luv4horses. You have it backwards. Zone 7b is a warmer climate than 7a. So generally if a plant can grow in 7a, it will be fine in 7b.
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
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BTW, there's also a new climate map not for cold, but for heat. This map is very helpful for someone like me who lives in Phoenix. Plants here aren't generally limited by cold, but by heat.
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
No, luv4horses. You have it backwards. Zone 7b is a warmer climate than 7a. So generally if a plant can grow in 7a, it will be fine in 7b.

Ummm - that IS what L4H said, that zone 7b is a warmer climate than 7a, only said in different words.


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Old 11-22-2017, 11:39 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
4,375 posts, read 4,713,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
BTW, there's also a new climate map not for cold, but for heat. This map is very helpful for someone like me who lives in Phoenix. Plants here aren't generally limited by cold, but by heat.

Thanks for this tip. Is there a website for that climate heat map, if so can you please post the link for us? I tried to find it but only came across one website that has such tiny little images you can barely make any of it out. Is the map only for USA or does it include other locations too?


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