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Old 11-21-2017, 04:08 PM
 
Location: NC
5,485 posts, read 5,806,547 times
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The reason the link did not work for the OP is he is a new poster. I think certain techno-privileges are delayed until a number (10?) of posts have been made by a user.
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Old 11-22-2017, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
1,744 posts, read 1,085,699 times
Reputation: 1693
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Hemlocks have needles, not flat, scaled leaves like cedars. https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...6333A8F00FE74A


The OP's pictures look like they are of one type out of a variety of North American cedars species, it might be a white or a red or some other cedar, but it's not a hemlock or a juniper which are different species of evergreens. Hemlocks and junipers don't have the same kinds of leaves and scale conformation as the North American cedars. There are several varieties of North American cedars and they all have flat scaled leaves.

sr1, you might find this helpful to identify which type of cedar you have:


https://www.thoughtco.com/identify-the-cedars-1341849


https://www.thoughtco.com/cedars-and...af-key-1343473

.
Thanks for your input, Zoisite. First, it's helpful to avoid using common names like cedars, etc. To me, there are the following different plants: the "true" cedars (Cedrus); the plant commonly called red cedar (Juniper); and the huge western species used for lumber, common name red cedar (Thuja).

So with these different species (Genus) I've listed, which one is in the picture?
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Old 11-22-2017, 01:33 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
4,418 posts, read 4,745,718 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
Thanks for your input, Zoisite. First, it's helpful to avoid using common names like cedars, etc. To me, there are the following different plants: the "true" cedars (Cedrus); the plant commonly called red cedar (Juniper); and the huge western species used for lumber, common name red cedar (Thuja).

So with these different species (Genus) I've listed, which one is in the picture?

Without seeing the full tree from top to bottom and it's true dimensions I'm going by the picture that has the OP's hand in it to get an estimated idea of the dimensions of the plant and it's leaves. To really be able to properly identify a plant I like to be present so I can see, feel, smell and taste it (and look for other identifying characteristics) but that of course is not possible to do when all you have are spotty pictures on internet.

Be that as it may, to answer your question - Judging by the thin upright leader stems, their stringy bark and red-brown colour and the blunt, rounded fan shaped leaves and their bright solid green colour (no yellow or gold banding) - I'm taking a stab in the dark and saying it looks to me like it might be a dwarfed spire shaped Thuja Occidentalis in the cypress family Cupressaceae, aka northern white-cedar aka eastern arborvitae. It's native to north eastern USA and eastern Canada and is now one of the more common garden and landscaping plants used throughout North America. I'm guessing the OP's trees may be no more than about 10 - 12 feet tall going by the size of the leader stems.

.
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Old Today, 01:52 PM
sr1 sr1 started this thread
 
3 posts, read 533 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Without seeing the full tree from top to bottom and it's true dimensions I'm going by the picture that has the OP's hand in it to get an estimated idea of the dimensions of the plant and it's leaves. To really be able to properly identify a plant I like to be present so I can see, feel, smell and taste it (and look for other identifying characteristics) but that of course is not possible to do when all you have are spotty pictures on internet.

Be that as it may, to answer your question - Judging by the thin upright leader stems, their stringy bark and red-brown colour and the blunt, rounded fan shaped leaves and their bright solid green colour (no yellow or gold banding) - I'm taking a stab in the dark and saying it looks to me like it might be a dwarfed spire shaped Thuja Occidentalis in the cypress family Cupressaceae, aka northern white-cedar aka eastern arborvitae. It's native to north eastern USA and eastern Canada and is now one of the more common garden and landscaping plants used throughout North America. I'm guessing the OP's trees may be no more than about 10 - 12 feet tall going by the size of the leader stems.

.

Holy. Guacamole.


Thanks ALL for all the great help, and I am very impressed with the big brain on Zoisite... though they're only about 7' right now.
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