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Old 12-04-2017, 11:50 AM
 
Location: PNW
2,215 posts, read 746,182 times
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Here ya go, oak tree bark results:

https://www.google.com/search?q=oak+...w=1152&bih=581
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Old 12-04-2017, 12:04 PM
 
Location: PNW
2,215 posts, read 746,182 times
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The bark looks a little like the red oak. It may look different as it ages.

https://www.extension.iastate.edu/fo...K_RED_bark.jpg

https://www.extension.iastate.edu/fo...s/red_oak.html

This one has some bark loss.

Photobucket

http://forums2.gardenweb.com/discuss...with-bark-loss

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Old 12-04-2017, 12:50 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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I'm thinking it might be blue oak, whose leaves can have a multitude of shapes including the shape and colour of the leaves on OP's tree which has both lobed and pointed leaf tips. Also, the lower bark of mature blue oak looks like the lower bark of OP's tree. The picture below is blue oak.





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Old 12-04-2017, 01:50 PM
 
1,480 posts, read 788,702 times
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[quote=Zoisite;50305542]I'm thinking it might be blue oak, whose leaves can have a multitude of shapes including the shape and colour of the leaves on OP's tree which has both lobed and pointed leaf tips. Also, the lower bark of mature blue oak looks like the lower bark of OP's tree. The picture below is blue oak.


assume you are referring to q. douglasii native to northern and central California which isn't that common in cultivation there and would likely be VERY rare in Texas (where the pictures were taken I think)---especially because it (and many other western oaks both evergreen and deciduous from the summer DRY pacific coast area) apparently have great difficulty surviving the summer WET conditions there.


it's interesting to note OTOH that many of the oaks from eastern North America that have moist summers in habitat (think "red", "scarlet", and "pin" oaks for example) grow well. in the "far west"---especially if they can get summer water somehow and most especially like growing in a lawn or other area that gets regular summer watering. for that matter, "sweetgum"/liquidambar, "tulip tree"/liriodendron, and "southern magnolia"/magnolia grandiflora among others are eastern trees also commonly grown in parts of the west (again, best with extra water in summer) but again, the exchange of native trees west to east is much less and our native madrone/arbutus, redwood/sequoia and sequoiadendron, maples, and buckeyes/aesculus don't seem to thrive on the "right coast".

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 12-04-2017 at 02:40 PM..
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Old 12-04-2017, 06:14 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOSS429 View Post
i have two oaks that hold their brown leaves all winter but i cant remember the variety ..
Used to live in Iowa. Lots of oaks waited until spring to drop. LOL at fall cleanup.
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Old 12-04-2017, 06:35 PM
 
1,480 posts, read 788,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Used to live in Iowa. Lots of oaks waited until spring to drop. LOL at fall cleanup.


yes, many oaks hold their foliage but often as "dead" (no longer photosynthesizing) BROWN leaves (especially in cooler climates) while others hold their "live" (at least partly functioning) leaves GREEN until late winter/early spring (especially in somewhat warmer climates). for example the "evergreen" emory (quercus emoryii) and coast live oak (q. agrifolia) will keep almost all their leaves green until some time in late March or April when they drop most of those (still) green leaves and are briefly gone for a couple of weeks and then quickly grow new ones. the deciduous q. palustris/pin oak (among others) OTOH will often retain the brown leaves for a long time in winter but eventually they will go and be replaced by a new set of green leaves.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 12-04-2017 at 07:22 PM..
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Old 12-04-2017, 07:08 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
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Found a site that lists some oaks that hold their leaves. It may help. Seeing a more close up of leaves and bark and tree structure probably help.

http://www.gardenguides.com/info_837...ad-leaves.html
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Old 12-04-2017, 07:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asubram3 View Post
Not sure why pictures did not upload earlier.

Based upon the bark and the tree branch canopy spread pattern it is a Laurel Oak (Quercus Laurifolia).
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Old 12-04-2017, 07:58 PM
 
1,480 posts, read 788,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ciceropolo View Post
Based upon the bark and the tree branch canopy spread pattern it is a Laurel Oak (Quercus Laurifolia).

good to hear and glad to know. right, wrong, or indifferent and probably apropos of nothing, I had suggested pretty much the same thing in comment #10 of this thread. that said, "laurel oak" has been cussed and discussed by learned taxonomists over the years and not that long ago was "split" into q. hemisphaerica/laurel oak AND q. laurifolia/swamp laurel oak and sometimes the differences may be subtle/confusing and leaves on young trees on both can be rather different (more lobes or teeth) than adult leaves which (for me at least) adds to the confusion.
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Old 12-04-2017, 08:15 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,964 posts, read 5,757,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ciceropolo View Post
Based upon the bark and the tree branch canopy spread pattern it is a Laurel Oak (Quercus Laurifolia).

OP's tree has both round lobes and pointed tips of oak leaves, but it doesn't have the laurel shaped leaves of Laurel Oak.

Laurel Oak leaves: - https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...a)&FORM=HDRSC2


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