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Old 12-04-2017, 09:33 PM
 
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Looks like Red Oak
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Old 12-04-2017, 11:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
OP's tree has both round lobes and pointed tips of oak leaves, but it doesn't have the laurel shaped leaves of Laurel Oak.

Laurel Oak leaves: - https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...a)&FORM=HDRSC2


.

I stand corrected. In examining the leaves closer, the leaves are red oak in appearance but the bark looks distinctly laurel oak. See these samples http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/GardenP...LaurelOaks.pdf


I wonder if it is a hybrid of sorts as red oaks that mature in size most often have ridged bark and that photo shows what appears to be lots of smooth and light gray horizontal banding patches like a laurel. It may be a Southern red oak / Laurel hybrid.


See the Southern Red Oak hybrid list on the following there is a Southern Red - Laurel hybrid:
Oak Hybridization


Nothing like a good detective challenge - nice specimen.
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Old Yesterday, 12:16 AM
 
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[quote=ciceropolo;50310222]I stand corrected. In examining the leaves closer, the leaves are red oak in appearance but the bark looks distinctly laurel oak. See these samples http://lee.ifas.ufl.edu/Hort/GardenP...LaurelOaks.pdf


I wonder if it is a hybrid of sorts as red oaks that mature in size most often have ridged bark and that photo shows what appears to be lots of smooth and light gray horizontal banding patches like a laurel. It may be a Southern red oak / Laurel hybrid.


See the Southern Red Oak hybrid list on the following there is a Southern Red - Laurel hybrid:
Oak Hybridization


Nothing like a good detective challenge - nice specimen.[/quote


the "laurel" oaks which are botanically part of the larger "red" oak group are difficult to untangle because in fact the distinct possibility that there are a number of crosses between laurifolia, hemisphaerica, nigra, phellos, rubra, shummardii, etc. which can produce progeny with a wide and confusing mix of leaf and bark characteristics which make any "certain" i.d. more than a bit problematic at times.
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Old Yesterday, 12:30 AM
 
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I had both a Live Oak and two Red Oaks that I planted years ago. That is not a Live Oak. I don't think that's a Red Oak, since although my Red Oak kept some of its leaves (turned brown) thru the winter, they TURNED yellow/orange, then vivid red-orange by Thanksgiving. Sometimes a little later, if warmer than usual.

Your tree still has its leaves, and they are green (not the dark, vivid green of the Live Oak, though). So I don't think it's a Red Oak (altho Red Oak is very common throughout Texas and grows well in the state). Also, your tree is a nice tree, but not as eye catching as a Red Oak usually is.

I think it might be a white oak. The leaves are pretty spot on to yours. It's a native tree to Texas, so it may have just sprouted up from an acorn. The bark of a white oak is:

Bark:
Smooth and red-brown on young trees, quickly developing white to ash-gray scales that ultimately form broad, loose plates giving the trunk a "shaggy" appearance. Old trees develop dark, thin ridges and deep fissures.

http://texastreeid.tamu.edu/content/TreeDetails/?id=89

It's deciduous, but since it's not cold where you are, the leaves haven't dropped yet, and are not preceded by a change in color before dropping. The leaves are dull on top, and pale underneath.

White oak is used to make watertight barrels.

Last edited by bpollen; Yesterday at 12:49 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 07:28 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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Adding two more pictures.
Attached Thumbnails
Help Identify Tree-rsz_20171205_071818.jpg   Help Identify Tree-rsz_120171205_071834.jpg  
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Old Yesterday, 09:42 AM
 
Location: In the black hole of social networking
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This photo of Quercas rubra L. has bark similar to OPs tree. Only problem is these trees like a lot of water.


"Bark on young trees is smooth and grey with some lighter
vertical lines." From below link.

The Tree Pages

The following is interesting, and may be helpful:

"Oaks are divided into two main groups by their leaf shape. Trees in the white oak group have either unlobed leaves with large teeth or leaves with rounded lobes while trees in the red oak group have leaves with pointed, bristle-tipped lobes.

Other members of the red oak group include black oak (Quercus velutina), pin oak (Quercus palustris), and Shumard oak (Quercus shumardii). Northern red oaks are most frequently confused with black oaks because each species is very variable and the two share many features."


Here is the Black Oak Quercus velutina. There is a southern version also, missouriensis.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_velutina

------------------------------------------
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Old Yesterday, 06:35 PM
 
24,139 posts, read 35,432,415 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
yes, many oaks hold their foliage but often as "dead" (no longer photosynthesizing) BROWN leaves (especially in cooler climates) while others hold their "live" (at least partly functioning) leaves GREEN until late winter/early spring (especially in somewhat warmer climates). for example the "evergreen" emory (quercus emoryii) and coast live oak (q. agrifolia) will keep almost all their leaves green until some time in late March or April when they drop most of those (still) green leaves and are briefly gone for a couple of weeks and then quickly grow new ones. the deciduous q. palustris/pin oak (among others) OTOH will often retain the brown leaves for a long time in winter but eventually they will go and be replaced by a new set of green leaves.
That's the one. I could not for the life of me remember the name.

Thanks.
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Old Yesterday, 09:04 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by asubram3 View Post
Adding two more pictures.





looking at more pictures it is possible that this MIGHT be a Texas (and Mexican) native quercus gravesii/"Chisos red oak" which can be deciduous (sometimes good red fall color), semi-deciduous, or evergreen (no fall color at all, LOL) depending on site and climate.
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Old Yesterday, 10:19 PM
 
Location: alabama.
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a little levity ... " it could be a dogwood ! " .. how can you tell ? ... by its bark .. HA !
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Old Today, 12:47 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOSS429 View Post
a little levity ... " it could be a dogwood ! " .. how can you tell ? ... by its bark .. HA !

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