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Old 12-17-2017, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,367 posts, read 44,726,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HappyNewMe View Post
... Most of those mentioned are not deciduous, I believe, so they definitely need light!
My figs and lemons all drop their leaves each time they are moved.
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Old 12-17-2017, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,367 posts, read 44,726,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by no kudzu View Post
... Why bring A Ginkgo indoors? They are hardy in all kinds of weather.
I have had them left outside and they died. -20F for 4 weeks will do that.

They are not always hardy enough for Four-Seasons regions.
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Old 12-18-2017, 08:46 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
26,277 posts, read 45,605,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Singlelady10 View Post
They are white Meidiland groundcover roses. I have 2 window boxes and one huge pot. They are so beautiful. They bloom like crazy in spring, summer, and fall. They are easy maintenance as well. I don't want to lose them.

The hydrangeas are Regula-White Bouquet hydrangeas. I have them in 2 self-wicker tall planters.
The hydrangeas are holding onto the buds but the leaves are brown and falling.
That's normal, that hydrangea is deciduous, and should die back in fall/winter, though the flowers last longer than the leaves. That rose is also deciduous, and while some leaves may make it through the winter, they should be removed in spring when pruning to prevent the spread of disease. In both cases you need to keep them cold enough for dormancy, just not let them get too much below freezing while in pots.
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Old 12-19-2017, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Pure Michigan
2,608 posts, read 3,932,726 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
That's normal, that hydrangea is deciduous, and should die back in fall/winter, though the flowers last longer than the leaves. That rose is also deciduous, and while some leaves may make it through the winter, they should be removed in spring when pruning to prevent the spread of disease. In both cases you need to keep them cold enough for dormancy, just not let them get too much below freezing while in pots.
Thanks! Is there a way to tell if they are still thriving during dormancy? Will I have to wait until spring?
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Old 12-19-2017, 10:25 PM
 
Location: Midvale, Idaho
1,360 posts, read 2,085,529 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
I over-winter plants in my living room.

Plants need light, even in winter they need to get some light.

I have fig trees, lemon trees, tea bushes and Ginkgo trees that all come indoors for winter.
OHHHH I would love to see pictures of that. Do you use grow lights? I am asking because where I live in Idaho there has been long strings of gloomy days latey. And then some days so cold I can not open the curtains. Or open them and keep my coat on in the house. I noticed in my bedroom that has good light when curtains are opened the hanging plants lost a lot of leaves and I think it is lack of light.
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Old 12-20-2017, 07:36 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,367 posts, read 44,726,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shades_of_idaho View Post
OHHHH I would love to see pictures of that. Do you use grow lights? I am asking because where I live in Idaho there has been long strings of gloomy days latey. And then some days so cold I can not open the curtains. Or open them and keep my coat on in the house. I noticed in my bedroom that has good light when curtains are opened the hanging plants lost a lot of leaves and I think it is lack of light.
We had some grow lights going for a few years, but, then we shifted to solar power with batteries.

Now that we are on solar power running grow lights would drain our batteries too quickly.
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Old 12-20-2017, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Midvale, Idaho
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Thanks for that. I do have one grow light in the kitchen. I understand their rays? do not go too fr so not sure it is even worth running. Finally today there is sun. I opened the curtains ASAP to let it in while it lasted. I would love to do solar but in winter we have very few sunny days and to keep the snow off of them in winter would be miserable for me.
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Old 12-20-2017, 12:30 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
28,367 posts, read 44,726,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shades_of_idaho View Post
Thanks for that. I do have one grow light in the kitchen. I understand their rays? do not go too fr so not sure it is even worth running. ...
To really grow something under lights you need to box the light inside mylar to reflect the light and avoid losing it out into a larger room. Then you measure the light wattage per square-foot of grow space. It takes a lot of wattage to really make things grow. If I remember correctly you need a minimum of 50 watts of light per every square-foot of grow space. And the lights need to be of the exact proper wavelength frequency. Because you need a lot of wattage, the lights will make a lot of heat, so you then need ventilation on the light fixtures so they do not start structural fires.

I am working on a project remodeling a downtown building, and I have had some interesting conversations with the city Building Inspector. He has been looking at a bunch of remodeling projects lately, where people are installing grow lights and proper ventilation. It can take a lot of ventilation to make those lights safe and up to code.

I also have a close friend who starts seeds every Spring, in a South window under some grow lights. Her seedlings get natural sunlight plus the grow lights, and she does very well with her setup.

My household solar power system can not support grow lights.
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Old 12-20-2017, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Midvale, Idaho
1,360 posts, read 2,085,529 times
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Submarinar. I totally agree with you on the grow lighting. It is too complicated for me and I do not want to look at the needed set up. The added heat in the house would be great but not if it is going to burn the place down.

I have some nice windows that get east and southern light. There are 5 46 by 63 inch windows in the living room dinning room and one 30 by 63 inch east facing window. The window seat. I think I need to move the kitties off their favorite window seat in the sun and put my plants there. But then I am a bad kitty mommy. And also the little dog uses that window as his look out. I am afraid he would clear the plants in a hurry.
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Old 12-20-2017, 06:45 PM
 
4,454 posts, read 7,863,515 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KayAnn246 View Post
I have first year roses, hydrangeas, and mums that I have in pots. When I put them in the garage for overwintering in the middle of November, all the leaves were green and healthy. In the past few weeks, the leaves are starting to turn yellow (on the roses and mums) and dropped. I'm nervous because this is my first time overwintering in the garage and I purchased the hydrangeas and roses this spring. It is 11F outside. How often should I water them? How do I keep them alive until spring in the garage?
All those are deciduous, that means they’ll drop all their leaves and go to “sleep “ in the winter. That’s normal. If you worry about their roots being frozen, bring them in the garage and give them a bit of water every 2 weeks.
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