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View Poll Results: Which side of the Northern Hemisphere do you feel has greater plant diversity
The Western Hemisphere, a.k.a North America, has more diversity thanks to wider climate variability 7 58.33%
The Old World, a.k.a, Europe and Russia is known for a greater diversity of plants due to a more moderate climate 4 33.33%
I feel that Europe, Russia, and North America are dead even when it comes to diversity in plants 1 8.33%
Voters: 12. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 01-08-2018, 07:13 PM
 
Location: 76131
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Ok, so I was curious, which part of the Northern Hemisphere has a greater diversity of plant species, a.k.a trees, shrubs, vines, and wildflowers, the East or the New World(West)?
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Old 01-08-2018, 07:16 PM
 
Location: The Woods
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North America. But people on both sides of the ocean have been planting plants and trees from everywhere for centuries.
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Old 01-08-2018, 08:19 PM
 
Location: A land flowing with milk and honey...
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I have to go with North and South America because I can't speak to the plant diversity of European gardens, I apologize.
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Old 01-08-2018, 08:23 PM
 
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personal gardens? I would say the us due to larger garden sizes...

my "garden" is larger than some of the houses I hear about in Europe. and places with more land in Europe tend to be poorer, so they garden out of necessity for food and not landscaping for looks

how many people in Europe have personal ponds in their gardens? it isn't uncommon here
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Old 01-09-2018, 04:20 AM
B87
 
Location: Norwich, UK
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Europe. Go down any street in most UK cities and the non-native plants will massively outnumber the native species.
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Old 01-09-2018, 06:37 AM
 
Location: NC
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What an odd question. It would clearly depend on climate and microclimate. Very hot or very cold regions have less diversity and tend to favor native species which have established well. Here in the US there are hundreds of types of oak trees simply because they are promiscuous in their crossing. So plant sex has a lot to do with it.

On the other hand, perhaps the OP means the attitude of gardiners to planting one of each and everything rather than planting in drifts or the like. And pulling those specimens from as far reaches of the hardiness/heat tolerance zones as possible. That is a different question. It also must include whether diseases have appeared and wiped out some well established plantings in the past. I'd say you have a little of each attitude everywhere.
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Old 01-12-2018, 07:07 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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I don't think there is a discrete answer to this question. There is a great diversity of climates in each region and hundreds
of thousands of amateur and professional gardeners experimenting within their ranges with plants from all over the world.

I remember the first time I saw Douglas fir and Redwood in England. I thought it was weird until I considered how many European and Asian species we grow in gardens and commercially, here in the States.

I grew up on a street lined with London Plane trees which themselves are 19th century hybrids of Eurasian Plane (Platanus orientalis) and American Sycamore (Platanus Occidentalis).
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Old 01-13-2018, 04:23 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
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I think that both European and North American gardens have a pretty wide variety of plant species which are grown in them. Gardeners from both of these continents grow plants which are native to their countries/areas, non-natives, and so on.

Both areas have a pretty wide range of climates. North America has hot desert climates, temperate rainforests, subarctic climates, oceanic climates, subtropical/tropical climates, humid continental climates, Mediterranean-like climates, alpine climates, and so on. Europe also has a wide range of climates though not quite as many as North America.

On the other hand, many more plants grow in the milder oceanic climates of the UK than they do in the subarctic climates of northern Canada. Sometimes it works the other way; there are some plants and fruit producing trees that require periods of cold weather to produce fruit or bloom.

I would guess it is kind of a draw as to which continent has the most variety in gardens.
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Old 01-13-2018, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Lizard Lick, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
Europe. Go down any street in most UK cities and the non-native plants will massively outnumber the native species.
Probably because the uk has hardly any native species... NC is more diverse than all of northern europe in terms of plants and animal life. We have many more natibe species because once the ice age ended plants moved further north easily unlike in northern europe where the alps served as a barrier.
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Old 01-26-2018, 01:16 PM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
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Old world easily. Things moved east to west from China over to Europe also. Asia/China is the goldmine of plant diversity. Many of the good fruits come from there. Oranges and bananas of course and many others. China blows away North America.
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