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Old 01-30-2018, 05:55 AM
 
Location: northern New England
1,522 posts, read 606,263 times
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I have several amaryllis plants that were given to me as repotted bulbs last spring (10 months ago). A couple are doing fine and have even bloomed.

One has been a single, 2 foot long leaf ever since I got it. It shows no signs of making another leaf. Finally about a month ago I figured, maybe it was planted too deep so I repotted it with more of the bulb sticking out. It still isn't doing anything. Should I cut it back, or what?
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Old 01-30-2018, 06:16 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
33,560 posts, read 41,742,461 times
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If you’ve treated them all the same and some have bloomed, maybe this one with only one leaf needs more time to grow? Maybe it’s waiting for spring to put out more leaves to nourish a flower. Have you fertilized them?
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Old 01-30-2018, 07:19 AM
 
Location: northern New England
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yes, I use fertilizer spikes on all of them, and treat them all the same. Well, maybe I say bad things to this one sometimes....
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Old 01-30-2018, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Southeastern Pennsylvania
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We've tried several times over the years to coax amaryllis to bloom a second year. Our success rate was less than 50%.

Sounds like you've had a higher success rate than we ever did! Enjoy those blooms, keep the non-bloomer till it's obvious nothing's going to happen. We decided a while ago to just buy new bulbs every year.
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:17 AM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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I've got one (and only one) that blooms every other year. I thought that's what they do.

I don't cut back the stalks/leaves unless they're brown. very very brown. otherwise, I pretty much just water whenever and feed sparingly. I use the liquid stuff, not spikes.

Maybe just be patient and it'll bloom next year.
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Old 01-31-2018, 12:22 AM
 
Location: Somwhere
2,785 posts, read 1,072,227 times
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Bulbs like this are forced to bloom the first time with excessive fertilizer and artificial lighting.
Some plants recover from that better than others. It will probably look a lot better next year.

Don't cut it back. Bulbs need sun to build up their store for the next year. Cutting off all its green would kill it, or at least set it back even farther.

Last edited by steiconi; 01-31-2018 at 01:49 AM..
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Old 02-24-2018, 02:02 PM
 
Location: northern New England
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It's finally making a second leaf!! I guess lifting the bulb did the trick.
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Old 02-24-2018, 04:26 PM
 
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I've been growing these things for about 10 years, and have even purchased some specialty bulbs online.

Here's what I do. As soon as a stalk's blooms look shabby, I cut off the stalk near the base. Watch out, they have lots of water. I keep them in a sunny window. They go outside after the last frost date. I fertilize with osmocote. Come September or October, I stop watering and let them get dry, and put them in my garage or basement. They don't like real cool weather. Some leaves will dry up. Pull them off. If a leaf stays green, don't worry. You can go ahead and break dormancy.

When I'm ready to get them to bloom, I water them well, and move them to warm sunny windows. Some are already showing new growth in December. Remember not to overwater, but do it maybe once every week to 10 days.

One of mine even bloomed mid-summer last year, and again this winter!
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