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Old 02-04-2018, 01:37 PM
 
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The most cold hardy citrus is Poncirus trifoliata (-10F) but this is deciduous.

Several of its hydrids like Citrange(5F) Citrumelo(5F), citranadrin (0F), citranquat (5F). I think they are evergreen.
5F


Citrus ichangensis, the Ichang papeda is slow growing and quite hardy(?0-5F) and evergreen.

Its hybrids are edible but less hardy, Shangjuan(10F), Yuzu(10F)

The hybrid of Citrus ichangensis and Poncirus trifoliata is probably very hardy and may be evergreen. But I haven't seen it for sale anywhere in US, probably due to inedible fruit. The hybrid is called N1 Tri Voss.
I only found websites in Europe talking about it
https://www.oscartintori.it/prodotto...us-trifoliata/
SUBTROPICKÉ ROSTLINY od A do Z • Zobrazit téma - Citrus ichangensis x poncirus trifoliata
Poncirus trifoliata - Strana 2 z 3 - Citrusy.info
Fruit-xxx
ADAVO - C. ichangensis x Poncirus trifoliata "N1 Tri Voss"
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Old 02-04-2018, 03:58 PM
 
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you might check out www.woodlanders.net they have a large variety of "hardy" citrus hybrids for mail-order. that said, the "parentage" that gives hardiness also tends to give sourness so even the best of them may be at their best with at least a "spoonful of sugar". all will likely do their best as both evergreens and as fruit bearers in "sub-(traditional)citrus" climates by being planted in cold wind protected spot in a warm site (like with a south or west exposure or wall). hope this helps. good luck.
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Old 02-04-2018, 05:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
you might check out www.woodlanders.net they have a large variety of "hardy" citrus hybrids for mail-order. that said, the "parentage" that gives hardiness also tends to give sourness so even the best of them may be at their best with at least a "spoonful of sugar". all will likely do their best as both evergreens and as fruit bearers in "sub-(traditional)citrus" climates by being planted in cold wind protected spot in a warm site (like with a south or west exposure or wall). hope this helps. good luck.
Thanks! The focus is cold hardiness and evergreen. The fruit is more a decoration than to eat.
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Old 02-04-2018, 06:28 PM
 
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just in case you haven't already mentioned, researched, or actually tried it, "Thomasville" (a "citrange" x kumquat hybrid) is supposed to be hardy down to 0. just curious what part of the country are you growing in?

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 02-04-2018 at 07:07 PM..
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Old 02-05-2018, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
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Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
just in case you haven't already mentioned, researched, or actually tried it, "Thomasville" (a "citrange" x kumquat hybrid) is supposed to be hardy down to 0. just curious what part of the country are you growing in?
'hardy down to 0' is not very hardy though.

I have dwarf lemons that I grow in buckets and I bring them indoors for winter in zone 4b.
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Old 02-05-2018, 03:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
'hardy down to 0' is not very hardy though.

I have dwarf lemons that I grow in buckets and I bring them indoors for winter in zone 4b.
I think that is the range of the hardiest evergreen citrus.
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Old 02-05-2018, 03:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
I think that is the range of the hardiest evergreen citrus.

yes.


of course "hardy enough" is a relative thing and while "hardy to 0" is probably NOT going to do it for USDA zone 4b (where there are likely rather few broadleaved evergreens of any sort let alone citrus that can grow outdoors without some kind of serious protection in the winter), it just might be sufficient for your needs in your zone---wherever you are and whatever your zone is.


that said, "hardy" may not mean "bullet proof" and absolutely cold hardy in ANY and ALL winters (even the coldest ones that might come every once in awhile) and in ANY site or position (including the coldest and/or hottest exposures and microclimates) but instead grows well and looks good in most "normal" winters and when planted in a favorable spot (suitable soil drainage and fertility, and naturally not too hot or too cold for it's optimal seasonal requirements) that suits its needs for growth and survival within a given "zone".


zone recommendations for any plant are generally not guarantees or certainties. but instead more like estimates and suggestions on probabilities for plants and their planters.
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Old 02-08-2018, 01:35 PM
 
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I tried several of them and Poncirus is the only one that lives up to its hype. I am in Zone 7A. Sure they all can survive average winter temps but when the polar vortexes hit, the Citrus capitulates.

I also have an Inchang that survived last winter, but came out all banged up. It recovered, but now looks like it has been nuked.

Now if you are wiling to add serious protection, the game changes. But then you might as well go with a more tasty one like Satsumas.
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Old 02-08-2018, 08:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
I tried several of them and Poncirus is the only one that lives up to its hype. I am in Zone 7A. Sure they all can survive average winter temps but when the polar vortexes hit, the Citrus capitulates.

I also have an Inchang that survived last winter, but came out all banged up. It recovered, but now looks like it has been nuked.

Now if you are wiling to add serious protection, the game changes. But then you might as well go with a more tasty one like Satsumas.
how would they do with some protection, like cover with burlap?
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Old 02-09-2018, 12:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
how would they do with some protection, like cover with burlap?
Not so much that as that might rot the plants.

I have seen posts on other sites where people are growing the real deal in New England by using small greenhouses with heaters or wall of water protection.

Very high maintenance but it works.

I planted my Inchang right next to a southern facing wall and placed a mini trellis with Christmas lights next to it.
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