U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-08-2018, 01:38 PM
 
Location: Bloomington, IL
11,507 posts, read 5,926,799 times
Reputation: 25979

Advertisements

I've been reading that peanut shells can take a year or two to decompose and that the recommendation is to grind them up before putting them in your compost heap.

My question is a little different - I feed shelled peanuts to squirrels and over the winter especially there gets to be a LOT of shells in the yard. During the rest of the year I'm mowing so I don't notice as much. But will all these shells end up being bad for my yard if they take so long to break down, even after mowing over them? Should I just rake them up once thing dry up and dispose of them in the trash?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-09-2018, 07:36 AM
 
4,368 posts, read 8,065,564 times
Reputation: 3356
IMO the worst effect would be walking barefoot in your yard. The shell's effect should be beneficial.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2018, 07:37 AM
Status: "Keep your friends close and your enemies closer" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
30,262 posts, read 36,634,398 times
Reputation: 37496
Just the mess of shells laying around. Sunflower hulls make a bigger mess.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-10-2018, 01:24 PM
 
2,302 posts, read 953,916 times
Reputation: 2049
...and sunflower hulls make a good mulch, although they don't last more than a few months once weather warms up. I have the remains of perhaps 200lb every year on the edge of my main garden. The plants seem to love those hulls.

Peanut shells? I suspect your soil says "yumm".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Bloomington, IL
11,507 posts, read 5,926,799 times
Reputation: 25979
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
...and sunflower hulls make a good mulch, although they don't last more than a few months once weather warms up. I have the remains of perhaps 200lb every year on the edge of my main garden. The plants seem to love those hulls.

Peanut shells? I suspect your soil says "yumm".
Well, maybe....should I rake them from where they are concentrated around my deck (where I'm putting them out for the squirrels) and scatter them around my yard and mow over them?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 10:17 AM
 
2,302 posts, read 953,916 times
Reputation: 2049
Since they mulch well, if you want the stuff underneath dead, like weeds, leave them. If they're on grass, spread them out. If you have a mower and don't bag, mowing can't hurt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 11:16 AM
 
Location: NC
5,800 posts, read 6,327,901 times
Reputation: 11196
I'm guessing that peanut shells have a similar composition to sawdust. That means a high carbon to nitrogen ratio, which is slow to decompose. So, either mix them with grass or weeds that are composting, or scatter a handful of nitrogen fertilizer over the top.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 11:36 AM
 
2,302 posts, read 953,916 times
Reputation: 2049
Quote:
Originally Posted by luv4horses View Post
I'm guessing that peanut shells have a similar composition to sawdust. That means a high carbon to nitrogen ratio, which is slow to decompose. So, either mix them with grass or weeds that are composting, or scatter a handful of nitrogen fertilizer over the top.
Interesting that the same high carbon idea applies to bark mulch, too, which can decay gracefully over a year or two, yet few folks throw high nitrogen fertilizer on their mulched beds. I'm sure it's a good idea, but hardly essential.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 11:36 AM
 
4,368 posts, read 8,065,564 times
Reputation: 3356
You're correct that they decompose slowly. Plus they may harbor diseases like blight and bad nematodes. I wouldn't recommend using them for mulch and they'll decompose faster in a compost pile, but just leaving them (or raking) shouldn't be too bad. You're also correct that adding some nitrogen may help them decompose faster.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-11-2018, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
61,685 posts, read 43,824,856 times
Reputation: 9829
It's fine. Go for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top