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Old 10-08-2018, 07:31 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashley52 View Post
What about bare-root trees shipped in the fall? How can their success rate be maximized, since it sounds like these guys prefer mid-summer transplanting? I'd hate to think that I wasted my $14 on a couple of 'em from ArborDay's Tree Store...
As long as your weather has cooled enough that the trees stay dormant, fall is a good time to plant them.

Soak the roots in a bucket of water for about 6-8 hours, then plant in a hole with good drainage, and water if you have a dry spell. It's always best to plant as soon as possible after being shipped, but of it's too warm out the tree may break dormancy and start to sprout too early.
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Old 10-08-2018, 08:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashley52 View Post
What about bare-root trees shipped in the fall? How can their success rate be maximized, since it sounds like these guys prefer mid-summer transplanting? I'd hate to think that I wasted my $14 on a couple of 'em from ArborDay's Tree Store...
Where'd you hear they like mid-summer transplanting? I'm aware of no plant that likes to be moved mid-summer, in the height of their growth period. Bare root stock is shipped when it's dormant, and generally should be planted on receipt, since the root system is prone to drying.
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Old 10-08-2018, 02:09 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashley52 View Post
What about bare-root trees shipped in the fall? How can their success rate be maximized, since it sounds like these guys prefer mid-summer transplanting? I'd hate to think that I wasted my $14 on a couple of 'em from ArborDay's Tree Store...

What kind of trees are they and what's your location and current local temperatures/climate conditions?

As mentioned by others if they're bare root shipped in fall you should plant them immediately upon receiving them. The longer you wait to plant bare root stock the more you will minimize their chances of surviving. So do it now following Hemlock140's instructions.

I don't know of any plants or trees that prefer mid-summer transplanting unless they're already badly root-bound and are declining in health because of it.


.
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Old 10-08-2018, 04:15 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
12,995 posts, read 10,497,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
i tried digging up the hickory yesterday. it was growing next to a retaining wall close to my house but was a nice vigorous tree that i hoped to save, about 2.5 inches diameter at the base, 5-6 feet tall. you are right- i dug down over 2 1/2 feet and it was nowhere near ready to come out. unfortunately i had to get out the battery chainsaw and cut it down
all i have to show for a lot of work is a sore back.

hoping to have better luck with the 3 black cherries.

I don't know if you really want to transplant your black cherry trees. I cut down all my smaller black cherries when I first moved to where I live. Black cherries can become covered with tent caterpillars in the Spring. The larger (taller) ones not so much. But when they are small the tent caterpillars love them and then can spread to any fruit trees. Our home was covered with the caterpillars before I got rid of the trees. After I got rid of the trees I kept a close eye on our fruit trees and sprayed when necessary - no more problems.
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Old 10-08-2018, 07:34 PM
 
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I've always had good luck transplanting during a cold December/January rain. The rainy winter days are so much less depressing when you are outside.
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Old 10-08-2018, 08:17 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
I have some hickory and cherry trees that are about 3 -5 feet tall that need to be relocated. is now (winter) the best time to dig them up and move them to somewhere more appropriate?
Ugga, this may sound crazy but I worked with some older men who could live off the country if they had to. We worked on the state highway crew here in Kentucky and would occasionally dig up a dogwood or redbud or even pecan and walnut tree out of the woods and replant them in their yard. According to all of them, replant trees only in a month with an "R" in it. Don't know what that had to do with it but I never saw a tree they planted ever die.
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:03 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I don't know if you really want to transplant your black cherry trees. I cut down all my smaller black cherries when I first moved to where I live. Black cherries can become covered with tent caterpillars in the Spring. The larger (taller) ones not so much. But when they are small the tent caterpillars love them and then can spread to any fruit trees. Our home was covered with the caterpillars before I got rid of the trees. After I got rid of the trees I kept a close eye on our fruit trees and sprayed when necessary - no more problems.
i haven't tried digging them up yet, but i know what you mean regarding the caterpillars. i have a smaller 8-footer that seems to collect them every spring but so far it hasn't been too hard to rake them out with a stick.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kygman View Post
Ugga, this may sound crazy but I worked with some older men who could live off the country if they had to. We worked on the state highway crew here in Kentucky and would occasionally dig up a dogwood or redbud or even pecan and walnut tree out of the woods and replant them in their yard. According to all of them, replant trees only in a month with an "R" in it. Don't know what that had to do with it but I never saw a tree they planted ever die.
that makes sense - September thru april.

Last edited by uggabugga; 10-10-2018 at 09:12 AM..
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
i haven't tried digging them up yet, but i know what you mean regarding the caterpillars. i have a smaller 8-footer that seems to collect them every spring but so far it hasn't been too hard to rake them out with a stick.

Once they get 15' or 20' high it gets harder and harder to rid them of the webs and caterpillars. To me it would be like planting your back yard with Tree of Heavens knowing that there are lanternflies around - I really don't think it is a great idea. Why make your life harder with something else to worry about?

Just to make sure: You are talking about native 'wild' black cherry trees that do not have real cherries? I am not talking about trees that produce real black cherries.
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Old 10-10-2018, 10:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Once they get 15' or 20' high it gets harder and harder to rid them of the webs and caterpillars. To me it would be like planting your back yard with Tree of Heavens knowing that there are lanternflies around - I really don't think it is a great idea. Why make your life harder with something else to worry about?

Just to make sure: You are talking about native 'wild' black cherry trees that do not have real cherries? I am not talking about trees that produce real black cherries.
i'm talking about the native wild black cherries that do have small but real cherries..
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Old 10-10-2018, 11:59 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
12,995 posts, read 10,497,140 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
i'm talking about the native wild black cherries that do have small but real cherries..

I am talking about Prunus serotine: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_serotina. If your cherries produce a good eating cherry; please disregard my warnings and good luck transplanting!
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