U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-10-2018, 02:12 PM
 
23,722 posts, read 17,505,240 times
Reputation: 12668

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I am talking about Prunus serotine: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunus_serotina. If your cherries produce a good eating cherry; please disregard my warnings and good luck transplanting!
i think we're talking about the same thing. we just differ on what's considered 'good eating'

i'll bet we can agree that the wood is fantastic. and the cherries make great jam if you have the patience to deal with them since half the cherry volume is the pit.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-10-2018, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
12,995 posts, read 10,497,140 times
Reputation: 9127
Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
i think we're talking about the same thing. we just differ on what's considered 'good eating'

i'll bet we can agree that the wood is fantastic. and the cherries make great jam if you have the patience to deal with them since half the cherry volume is the pit.

I told you years ago about one wild cherry I had that had a rotten base and I cut it down. I then proceeded to have it cut up by a man with a portable saw mill. Then I hauled the wood to a Mennonite in Ephrata PA and had him make furniture for us. Plus I took pictures of the whole process so each piece of furniture has its own history tapped to the bottom. Yes the wood is fantastic!

Its too bad they cannot go from small to very large overnight! When they are half size is when you have problems with the tent caterpillars. Maybe the big ones are too high to climb?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2018, 07:45 PM
 
23,722 posts, read 17,505,240 times
Reputation: 12668
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I told you years ago about one wild cherry I had that had a rotten base and I cut it down. I then proceeded to have it cut up by a man with a portable saw mill. Then I hauled the wood to a Mennonite in Ephrata PA and had him make furniture for us. Plus I took pictures of the whole process so each piece of furniture has its own history tapped to the bottom. Yes the wood is fantastic!

Its too bad they cannot go from small to very large overnight! When they are half size is when you have problems with the tent caterpillars. Maybe the big ones are too high to climb?
it does seem a little weird that you only see caterpillars on the smaller trees- maybe they get tired of climbing the big ones and give up?

yes i remember your furniture project. do you have any pictures?
cherry wood mostly goes into my smoker and woodstove - although i often feel a little twinge of guilt putting the good stuff in the woodstove
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2018, 08:08 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
12,995 posts, read 10,497,140 times
Reputation: 9127
Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
it does seem a little weird that you only see caterpillars on the smaller trees- maybe they get tired of climbing the big ones and give up?

yes i remember your furniture project. do you have any pictures?
cherry wood mostly goes into my smoker and woodstove - although i often feel a little twinge of guilt putting the good stuff in the woodstove
Here is a picture of the cherry corner cupboard that the Mennonite carpenter made for us:





You like cherry for your smoker; I have a lot of apple and pear right now. Problem is that it's contaminated with the fire blight! I would like to plant some new trees now; but I want to clean up better and I think it is best to wait until Spring because of the disease.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2018, 08:31 AM
 
23,722 posts, read 17,505,240 times
Reputation: 12668
that's beautiful! what was the diameter of the tree trunk that was made from? around here i rarely see black cherry trees with long straight trunks, they are generally fairly twisty.

i think you could still use wood from those trees in a smoker. does fire blight affect the appearance of the wood?
it is a nasty disease all right.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2018, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
12,995 posts, read 10,497,140 times
Reputation: 9127
Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
that's beautiful! what was the diameter of the tree trunk that was made from? around here i rarely see black cherry trees with long straight trunks, they are generally fairly twisty.

i think you could still use wood from those trees in a smoker. does fire blight affect the appearance of the wood?
it is a nasty disease all right.

The tree was close to 24" in diameter; a good size tree. I currently have one large one standing. It has two trucks instead of one. One of the two trunks is about 12' in diameter and one is about 18". The tree is about 60' tall and does have sections straight enough to get some good boards.

But, yes, many of them are very twisted. One neighbor had one fairly large that bent so bad that you could sit on a loop close to the ground. That loop came over on my land and it eventually touched the ground as the tree got older. It poised a danger to my sheds because of the lean and I removed their tree from my property. I left them with a stump (headed in my direction) that is cut off at the property line!

Most of the visible damage from fire blight is on the bark or right under the bark. Of course dead limbs are very visible. Using the wood in a wood burner or smoker would be a good way to kill the disease. The problem comes from transporting the wood and the chance that it might infect good fruit trees.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2018, 10:59 AM
 
4,743 posts, read 8,418,065 times
Reputation: 3999
I'm going to echo uggabugga, that's beautiful! If you don't mind answering, was it costly compared to store-bought furniture?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-11-2018, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
12,995 posts, read 10,497,140 times
Reputation: 9127
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
I'm going to echo uggabugga, that's beautiful! If you don't mind answering, was it costly compared to store-bought furniture?

I have the exact price on the back of the corner cupboard with its history; The problem is that I don't want to move it to get at that history. From my recollection it cost me a few hundred (maybe $250) to get the tree cut into boards. It cost me two X two hour trips to Ephrata, one to take him the lumber and one to pickup the furniture. And I think he charged a little less than a $1,000, he had also taken the lumber to a friend of his to have it kill dried before he made the furniture. He did a great job. That was about 20 years ago and I am sure that he probably charges more now if he is still in business - but he was very young; so he might be.

I was doing this as an anniversary present and I was not really concerned about the cost. But I thought that his work was great and I have no complaints about the cost. Plus we have pieces of furniture with their own unique history!

About five years ago my parents had a walnut tree come down on their property. I went down and cut it into eight foot logs and loaded it in the back of my pickup. I thought that I could find a portable sawmill or just a sawmill that would mill it into boards. I could not. Now the logs are starting to rot because I never thought that I would have a problem and I did not want to try to get the heavy logs into a shed. I had used a come-a-long to lift them into the pickup. Had I managed to get them turned into boards; I would have again tried my Mennonite carpenter.

Walnut trees are a good long term investment to plant or transplant now.


PS Here is a kitchen table he also made from the same wood:


Last edited by fisheye; 10-11-2018 at 12:51 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top