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Old 08-17-2018, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Yavapai County
685 posts, read 398,952 times
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Your harvest looks great, Nick! I really enjoy seeing the pictures. We have had a crazy summer monsoon season here too. We get hail, but not as much as you guys!

I have been getting quite a few cukes and peppers (jalapenos), but my green beans did terrible this year. Everything is grown in containers. I think I need to completely switch out the dirt in the bean container for next year. I'm thinking too many years growing beans in mostly the same dirt, even though I add new compost each year.
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Old 08-17-2018, 12:24 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickMan7 View Post
Oh my gosh, friends, my apologies for taking so long to get this update out. Again, life sometimes just gets in the way and that has been the case for me. I make no excuses, so let's get on to the update.

Our temperatures have finally moderated back to normal after an extraordinarily hot start to the season. Since mid-July, we've consistently held in the mid 80s to lower 90s which is much more normal for us. We've also had a very robust monsoon season with quite a bit of rain and tons of severe weather. July 25 brought 80mph+ winds and golf ball sized hail that destroyed numerous trees in our neighborhood and decimated my flowers. Fortunately, once rooted, they are very hardy and have rebounded almost completely. The veggie garden was spared almost completely thanks to my shade cloth. We've had 12 hailstorms at our house this season. For comparison, we had zero last year (well, we had one, but the garden hadn't been planted yet). Local news reported yesterday that the Front Range alone (the corridor generally from Cheyenne, WY to Pueblo, CO) has had more than 300 hailstorms this season, the most in about 10 years. Keep in mind we don't get hail until May. There have also been numerous days with tornadoes, thankfully most of them in rural areas well east of most major cities in this region. We are expecting seasonal to below-average temps over the next 7-10 days with a few chances for thunderstorms, particularly this coming weekend.

As far as the garden goes, all is doing extremely well. Our early heat meant many of the tomato and pepper flowers did not pollinate properly, or even at all, so much of the harvest is actually several weeks later than usual this season. Having said that, the onset of cooler weather in July has encouraged tons of new growth and production, so we are just now experiencing our first gluts. I expect consistent production for the next 6 weeks or so before the frost comes in early-mid October (hopefully even later).

Below are the varieties I am growing this season, along with numbers harvested to date and other notes as needed:

1. 1884 (x2) - 2 count - True to form, these tomatoes are gorgeous and HUGE. My first tomato harvested was 1 pound, 12 ounces and the second was 1 pound, 6 ounces. I have at least another 15-20 fruit at a pound or more on the plants right now. This is a wonderful variety and the plants are robust and vigorous.
2. Aker's West Virginia - 0 count - Very large, gorgeous fruit. Slightly fluted. Was late to produce last season - looking to be the same this season. Super healthy and robust plant.
3. Amana Orange - 2 count - Gorgeous, pure orange fruit with sweet flavor. Juicy. Weighs in right around 1 pound.
4. Aussie - 0 count - Beautiful fluted, flattened beefsteaks that are dark pink to brilliant red. Absolutely delicious. One issue I had was that many fruit had large cores, so not always the best for perfect slices.
5. Barnes Mountain - 1 count - Produces nice orange beefsteaks that are quite large. First fruit was 1 pound, 4 ounces.
6. Big Beef (x2) 8 count Huge, almost perfectly round slicers. All fruits so far between 11 and 14 ounces. I am not the biggest fan of flavor (tends to be blander than most), but is very disease resistant and is reliably productive.
7. Bush Early Girl (x3) 42 count Third season growing these and they will be a garden staple. Always produces beautiful mid-size tomatoes perfect for sandwiches and salad. Almost no blemishes and very reliable.
8. Celebrity 0 count This plant is in-ground and was not protected from recent hailstorms. While it should produce a few fruit, I hear very good things about this variety and will try it again in 2018 in hopes of better production.
9. Cream Sausage 23 count The best little cream-colored paste tomatoes. Very mild flavor. A favorite in our household. Makes very interesting pasta sauce.
10. Dester 3 count Large, delicious beefsteaks. Looks to produce quite a lot of fruit around a pound (maybe heavier). Looking forward to more from this guy.
11. Dr. Wyche's Yellow 0 count A perennial fave now for 3 seasons, it does not disappoint. I have not harvested a fruit yet, but the plant is loaded heavily with large, perfect fruit just waiting to ripen.
12. Giant Belgium 1 count Very large and vigorous vines with huge fruit. I have not tasted this one yet stay tuned!
13. Golden Girl 9 count Large, round light orange fruit averaging 8-10 ounces. Compact determinate plant produces tons of these tomatoes. I have at least 50 unripe fruit on the plant as of this update.
14. Grandpa's White Wax 0 count - Seems to have a semi-determinate growth habit, though it is an indeterminate. Fruit has not yet ripened, but the plant has set dozens of medium-sized beefsteaks. Should ripen to a beautiful white/cream color.
15. Harless Creek 0 count Healthy, large plant producing a couple very large fruit. Does not appear to be as productive as other varieties, but the fruit should be delicious.
16. Hillbilly 0 count This plant seems to have a very strange growth habit. It has lots of short, thick branches coming out of most main growing stems. Lots of fruit set, nothing harvested to date.
17. Kosovo 0 count This has some amazingly huge heart-shaped fruit on it. I am very much looking forward to sampling this variety.
18. Krasnodar Titans 0 count I knew better than to plant in-ground where this plant is struggling from recent hailstorms. I will grow again next year because of much success in the past. I still hope to get a handful of decent fruit before the frost comes. We still have time.
19. Manyel 0 count This variety also seems to have a semi-determinate growth habit. While the plant is extremely healthy and lush, it is not very tall. The fruit, however, are plentiful. I hope they taste as good as they look!
20. Mr. Underwood's Germant Giant 0 count Again, another very robust plant that should produce numerous large beefsteaks. See a recurring theme here?
21. Nicholajevna Pink 0 count I planted this one late to replace a diseased plant and it is a bit behind. It appears to be producing very large and perfect beefsteaks. Excited to see what transpires with this variety.
22. Paragon 2 count Similar in size and shape to Big Beef (slightly larger than Bush Early Girl), but much more flavorful. A perfect sandwich slicer.
23. Stump of the World 3 count Unfortunately, for the first time, this plant caught a disease fairly early, but I left it in anyway. I should get 4 or 5 additional medium-sized fruit from it. I will grow again next year because I have had very good results in several previous seasons.
24. Yaqui (x2) 5 count - My favorite long-storage paste tomato. Huge, blocky fruits are very meaty with little juice and thick skins. Keeps extremely well on the counter for a week or longer. The best I've grown for fresh pico or in applications where super juicy is not desired. The plant in the whiskey barrel has set copious amounts of fruit while the in-ground plant is struggling a bit since it was hit by hail. Next season will include 3-4 in containers where they thrive. It is the only variety I grow that gets BER every season regardless of what I do. It goes away on its own after the first flush of fruit and then the rest of the season is stress-free.

My other main focus this season has been peppers, mostly varieties of jalepenos. Below is a list of the varieties I'm growing, along with numbers harvested to date and other notes as needed:

Hot:

1. Anaheim (x2) 8 count
2. Emerald Fire Jalapeno (x3) 66 count These are HUGE jalapenos, some nearing 5" long, with medium heat and perfect flesh. Absolutely the best stuffing/baking jalapeno I've ever grown. Very prolific.
3. Flaming Jade Serrano 32 count Very hot, perfect serrano peppers. Plant is productive, but not overly so.. at least not yet.
4. Jalafuego (x2) 35 count
5. Jalepeno Early (x2) 28 count Smaller, blunt jalapenos. Quite hot. Good for pico and salsa.
6. Jalapeno M 19 count
7. Lemon Drop (x2) 0 count I am waiting for all of the green peppers (hundreds of them) to turn yellow so I can dry and make pepper flake.
8. Long Cayenne 0 Count
9. Poblano (x2) 11 count I've made chiles rellenos once so far and they are always make a top-notch garden to table dinner. Hope to make one more round and the rest are used in pico and salsa where they add a nice smokey hint.

Sweet:

1. Golden Calwonder (x2) 0 count
2. Red Knight (x2) 0 count
3. Sweet Banana (x2) 24 count

I have done a few batches of pickled peppers, but most of this year is just about enjoying growing food. I am sharing a ton of what I'm growing this season since I still have 4 cases of canned tomatoes from last season. Next season will be another huge tomato canning season because I will need to replenish my stock by then. I hope to set up another 4 Earthboxes and some other containers, as well.

My flowers out front are doing very well considering the onslaught of hail we've had this year. They are VERY resilient. They just come back each time, honestly sometimes even more beautiful than before. Nature's pruning, I guess. The petunias in the bed closest to the front porch have struggled to recover, but the impatiens are doing very well.

Enjoy the photos below. All were taken this past weekend, August 11-12.


Wow!!! Great job! And now you reap the benefits
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Old 08-17-2018, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbuglf View Post
Your harvest looks great, Nick! I really enjoy seeing the pictures. We have had a crazy summer monsoon season here too. We get hail, but not as much as you guys!

I have been getting quite a few cukes and peppers (jalapenos), but my green beans did terrible this year. Everything is grown in containers. I think I need to completely switch out the dirt in the bean container for next year. I'm thinking too many years growing beans in mostly the same dirt, even though I add new compost each year.
Thanks bigbug! The monsoon is ridiculous this year - the moisture is great (minus the flash flooding), but the wind and hail is really unnecessary as far as I'm concerned. SO much hail this year - I hope it isn't a sign of years to come. We can't seem to get any storms that don't contain hail anymore. They all seem to turn severe at some point during their cycle. Today, for example, was just supposed to be a day with "garden variety" storms and there have been 5 or 6 severe-warned storms around the area. Ridiculous.

I have terrible luck with beans every time I try them, so I feel you there. Do you grow bush or pole beans? I've only done bush - maybe I should try pole? I would need to erect some trellises. I have lots of soil to replace next year, too - my peppers seem to be struggling more and more each season. Time to replace soil next season, I think.
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Old 08-17-2018, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Wow!!! Great job! And now you reap the benefits
Indeed, my friend! And thank you! Hopefully we are able to use most everything that comes out of the garden this season fresh before it goes bad. I'm really not in the mood to can, but I will if I must. I have already inundated a few people with tomatoes, but the harvest is only just beginning. Maybe in the future I won't plant 35 tomato plants if all I want to do is eat fresh.. Common sense has never been my strong suit.
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Old 08-18-2018, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Yavapai County
685 posts, read 398,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickMan7 View Post
Thanks bigbug! The monsoon is ridiculous this year - the moisture is great (minus the flash flooding), but the wind and hail is really unnecessary as far as I'm concerned. SO much hail this year - I hope it isn't a sign of years to come. We can't seem to get any storms that don't contain hail anymore. They all seem to turn severe at some point during their cycle. Today, for example, was just supposed to be a day with "garden variety" storms and there have been 5 or 6 severe-warned storms around the area. Ridiculous.
I agree! This has been the most severe monsoon I've seen here. It is not over yet, but I hope it is winding down some!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickMan7 View Post
I have terrible luck with beans every time I try them, so I feel you there. Do you grow bush or pole beans? I've only done bush - maybe I should try pole? I would need to erect some trellises. I have lots of soil to replace next year, too - my peppers seem to be struggling more and more each season. Time to replace soil next season, I think.
I grow bush beans. They are "Empress" variety and they usually do wonderful here. I normally get a good harvest and easy care from them. I've even used seeds saved from previous harvests with great success.

I kind of think the old dirt is mostly the problem, but they also got kind of trashed by a bad hail storm we had too. Also, it was so hot early this season and into July, even hotter than normal for where we live in AZ. If I babied them, I might get them to produce some late season, but I'm not sure I want to bother. It is supposed to be near 100 for the next couple of days again.
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Old 08-20-2018, 11:46 AM
 
Location: Milwaukee Area of WI
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Great update NickMan!! Your plants are so healthy and that is a wonderful thing to see! Good for you Mr. GreenThumb. LOL

I have tons of cucs and zucchini. Made more Zucchini relish this year to can--that stuff is so amazing

I have lots of red Cherry and Grape tomatoes but he big tomatoes are taking their time getting red.

I usually grow beans too like another poster said and mine also did terrible. Plants (pole and bush) were healthy but No Beans. It's just the weirdest thing

I have a really healthy and long pumpkin plant as well but it only has ONE pumpkin on it! Arghhhhhhh

I always grow Marigolds in my garden to keep certain garden pests away from my plants and man did they do well this year. One looks like a damn bush. LOLOL

Really enjoy seeing how you do with your veggies and flowers NickMan! Thanks so much for sharing and being so detailed about it. You really are amazing
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Old 08-23-2018, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbuglf View Post
I agree! This has been the most severe monsoon I've seen here. It is not over yet, but I hope it is winding down some!
I hope it's done. We have had more than enough hail. We got a little the other night, but nothing damaging. We rarely get damaging hail this late in the season, so I am hopeful we've had our last!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbuglf View Post
I grow bush beans. They are "Empress" variety and they usually do wonderful here. I normally get a good harvest and easy care from them. I've even used seeds saved from previous harvests with great success.
I may need to try those. I've never tried pole beans, though, so maybe next year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbuglf View Post
I kind of think the old dirt is mostly the problem, but they also got kind of trashed by a bad hail storm we had too. Also, it was so hot early this season and into July, even hotter than normal for where we live in AZ. If I babied them, I might get them to produce some late season, but I'm not sure I want to bother. It is supposed to be near 100 for the next couple of days again.
It's definitely the beginning of the end here.. we still have another 6 weeks or so if we're lucky (average first frost is mid-October, but is often sooner).. this year's weather has put a lot of stress on the garden and much of it is already starting to wind down. My determinates are already going to bed which is very unusual. We have about a 160-day growing season and my determinates often produce well through the entire season with little damage..

Oh well, it's always fun to clean up and start planning for the next season - I am really looking forward to it!
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Old 08-23-2018, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CindyRoos View Post
Great update NickMan!! Your plants are so healthy and that is a wonderful thing to see! Good for you Mr. GreenThumb. LOL

I have tons of cucs and zucchini. Made more Zucchini relish this year to can--that stuff is so amazing

I have lots of red Cherry and Grape tomatoes but he big tomatoes are taking their time getting red.

I usually grow beans too like another poster said and mine also did terrible. Plants (pole and bush) were healthy but No Beans. It's just the weirdest thing

I have a really healthy and long pumpkin plant as well but it only has ONE pumpkin on it! Arghhhhhhh

I always grow Marigolds in my garden to keep certain garden pests away from my plants and man did they do well this year. One looks like a damn bush. LOLOL

Really enjoy seeing how you do with your veggies and flowers NickMan! Thanks so much for sharing and being so detailed about it. You really are amazing
Thank you, Cindy! I am amazed how well things are doing considering the turbulent weather we've had this season. Uber hot to start, then tons of hail and severe storms. Somehow I still have a garden..

Sounds like you are having late production with your tomatoes, too - seems a common issue with many gardeners this season! My first tomato this season was almost 3 weeks later than the first one in 2017.

I have had one cucumber from a severely hail-damaged vine - hopeful to get a few more. No squash this season, but going to be planting in 2019.

I'll do another update next week with pics from this weekend. I am getting hammered with tomatoes and peppers and our weather is finally supposed to be gorgeous and perfect for the foreseeable future (mid-upper 80s and no rain). I do suspect production will wind down relatively quickly since the plants appear stressed, but we'll see. If the weather stabilizes for an extended period, maybe they can make up some lost ground..

Cheers!!
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Old 08-24-2018, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Yavapai County
685 posts, read 398,952 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NickMan7 View Post
My determinates are already going to bed which is very unusual. We have about a 160-day growing season and my determinates often produce well through the entire season with little damage..
I had to look up this one. Always fun to learn new terms!

Our first frost here at 3800 ft. is usually near the end of Oct. Last year was warm and dry though, with very few hard frosts and very little rain. I wonder what this winter will bring?! We usually grow garlic through the winter, but last year we didn't. Not sure about this year yet.
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Old 09-07-2018, 05:11 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
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Default September 7, 2018 Update!

Hi friends! Time for another update from my container garden!

I know it's been a bit, but so it goes. The weather has been quite moderate since my last update. We only had 11 days above 90F in August and actually had one record low of 46F on the 20th. Pretty chilly for this time of year. The month ended up almost exactly at average (only .1F below normal), which was great for the garden! We had some rain at our house, but nothing too heavy and no severe weather to speak of. The past few days have been cloudy and rainy with temps in the 70s. The coming weekend and through next week should be very sunny and well above average with temps in the mid-80s to around 90F during the day and mid-50s to around 60F at night. Perfect for continued garden production.

While my overall yields are down, I am growing quite a large variety of beefsteaks (which explains the lower numbers). I have had some positively huge fruit this season and a lot of them; much higher yields of large fruit than ever before and on a much more consistent basis. I just harvested more than 10 fruit yesterday (September 6) alone that weighed over one pound. Pretty cool. I should still get another several very decent harvests over the coming weeks as long as we don't have a frost. Nothing below 55F is forecast for the next 7-10 days, so we should be fine for now.

Below are updated numbers/comments for each variety:

1. 1884 (x2) - 19 count (+17 since last update) Smallest 6 ounces; largest - 1 pound, 12 ounces. True to form, these plants produce beautiful, gorgeous tomatoes that are tasty and meaty. Very consistent yields of true large beefsteaks. A definite keeper.
2. Aker's West Virginia - 9 count (+9 since last update) - Smallest 6 ounces; largest 1 pound, 12 ounces. Not as productive as last season, but these tomatoes are huge and beautiful bright red. I should get another few nice fruit with the warm weather coming. I make take a break from this one next season, but will be growing again, for sure.
3. Amana Orange - 11 count (+9 since last update) - Smallest 10 ounces; largest 1 pound, 5 ounces. Gorgeous, pure orange fruit with sweet flavor. Juicy. Right up there with Dr. Wyche's Yellow.
4. Aussie - 5 count (+5 since last update) Smallest 1 pound, 5 ounces; largest 1 pound, 13 ounces. My plant is not producing as many fruit this season, but the fruit it's producing is HUGE. Produces gorgeous red, fluted fruit with dense and delicious flesh. My only complaint is that the central core can go almost all the way through the entire fruit rendering full sandwich slices impossible. So worth growing, though, and I will continue to do so in 2019.
5. Barnes Mountain - 6 count (+5 since last update) Smallest 7 ounces; largest - 1 pound, 8 ounces. Very nice and amazingly delicious orange fruit, though not a terribly productive plant. I will be growing again, but probably not in 2019.
6. Big Beef (x2) 30 count (+22 since last update) Smallest 5 ounces; largest - 12 ounces. These have been great slicing tomatoes, though not as flavorful as other similar varieties. I neglected to fertilize regularly and the plants have suffered. Will definitely grow again next year in hopes of much better production (I got over 90 fruit from one plant in 2015).
7. Bush Early Girl (x3) 74 count (+32 since last update) Smallest 5 ounces; largest - 9 ounces. This is my third season growing these and they will be a garden staple. Always produces beautiful mid-size tomatoes perfect for sandwiches and salad. Almost no blemishes and very reliable.
8. Celebrity 2 count (+2 since last update) I have gotten two nice fruit from this plant and actually hope for about a half-dozen more. Nice, round red fruit, similar to Early Girl or Paragon. Meaty and blemish-free for the most part. Deserves another chance next season when I can better protect it from hailstorms.
9. Cream Sausage 83 count (+50 since last update) Weighs between 2 and 3 ounces. We love this variety for the gorgeous color, mild flavor and abundant production. I hope to have two next season. Great conversation starter, too.
10. Dester 13 count (+10 since last update) - Smallest 10 ounces; largest - 1 pound, 6 ounces. Large, delicious beefsteaks. The plant continues to produce large green fruit which should easily hit 10+ ounces. Very healthy and a definite contender for another grow next season.
11. Dr. Wyche's Yellow 10 count (+10 since last update) - Smallest 5 ounces; largest 1 pound, 4 ounces. A perennial fave now for 3 seasons, it does not disappoint. Not as productive as in seasons past, so far, but a fantastic tomato with great sweet flavor. Seems quite susceptible to fertilizer burn, but still grows and produces beautifully, so I don't pay much mind.
12. Giant Belgium 10 count (+9 since last update) Smallest 12 ounces; largest - 1 pound, 11 ounces. This plant is the healthiest one in the garden and produces huge fruit. Only one of the 10 harvested so far was below 1 pound! A definite repeat next season.
13. Golden Girl 41 count (+32 since last update) - Smallest 5 ounces; largest - 10 ounces. This has been an interesting grow. Plant produced beautiful orange tomatoes initially, but the later fruit seem to have trouble ripening all the way through and I continue to have that issue. I like it okay, but will probably skip in 2019.
14. Grandpa's White Wax 14 count (+14 since last update) This plant produces beautiful medium-sized flattened white tomatoes that look very much like small white pumpkins. I like them okay eaten fresh, but they're beautiful canned up. I prefer sweeter tasting tomatoes this one is very mild and not a favorite for me. I probably will not grow this again, but it's been fun.
15. Harless Creek 5 count (+5 since last update) Smallest 11 ounces; largest 1 pound, 8 ounces. These very large tomatoes are stunningly gorgeous yellow/orange tomatoes with dense flesh and a fantastic sweet and fruity flavor. I am growing in a whiskey barrel, which I've learned is not ideal for indeterminates. I will try again next season in an Earthbox.
16. Hillbilly 1 count (+1 since last update) I am not a huge fan of these tomatoes and have left most on the plant to wait it out. One of the few I've had the past few seasons I just don't like.
17. Kosovo 13 count (+13 since last update) - Smallest 9 ounces; largest 1 pound, 12 ounces. This plant produces huge heart-shaped tomatoes. Extremely meaty and juicy. Some uneven ripening on the shoulders, but otherwise a very solid choice. Very interesting shape.
18. Krasnodar Titans 2 count (+2 since last update) Smallest 9 ounces; largest - 12 ounces. Hail got this one this year, so productivity is very low. I hope to better protect it next season when I will grow it again.
19. Manyel 10 count (+10 since last update) - Smallest 6 ounces; largest 15 ounces. Kind of an odd growing habit (semi-determinate?), but produces very nice creamy yellow fruit with lots of meat. Very juicy. Good variety to mix with Cream Sausage for canning.
20. Mr. Underwood's Germant Giant 8 count (+8 since last update) - Smallest 6 ounces; largest 1 pound, 8 ounces. Very nice, large beefsteak. Very similar to other dark pink beefsteaks and a great addition to the garden.
21. Nicholajevna Pink 5 count (+5 since last update) Smallest 10 ounces; largest 1 pound, 3 ounces. Reminds me very much of Stump of the World. Potato leaf variety produces beautiful pink beefsteaks, but is not particularly productive. I'd like to try this one again, but perhaps not next season.
22. Paragon 26 count (+24 since last update) Smallest 4 ounces; largest 11 ounces. Similar in size and shape to Big Beef (slightly larger than Bush Early Girl), but much more flavorful. A perfect sandwich slicer. Definitely worth growing again.
23. Stump of the World 3 count Unfortunately, for the first time, this plant caught a disease fairly early, but I left it in anyway. I should get 4 or 5 additional medium-sized fruit from it. I will grow again next year because I have had very good results in several previous seasons.
24. Yaqui (x2) 41 count (+36 since last update) My favorite long-storage paste tomato. Huge, blocky fruits are very meaty with little juice and thick skins. Keeps extremely well on the counter for a week or longer. The best I've grown for fresh pico or in applications where super juicy is not desired. The plant in the whiskey barrel has set copious amounts of fruit while the in-ground plant is struggling a bit since it was hit by hail. Next season will include 3-4 in containers where they thrive. It is the only variety I grow that gets BER every season regardless of what I do. It goes away on its own after the first flush of fruit and then the rest of the season is stress-free.

I am not doing a pepper update in this round because I've really only harvested a few Anaheims and lots of jalapenos. Plus, I admittedly haven't been the best about counting them as I harvest. Most of the jalapenos are doing very well, along with a few bells, and the rest of the peppers are shutting down. I need to replace the soil in the Earthboxes I grow my peppers in next season they just aren't doing very well at this point.

I have canned 51 pints of tomatoes to date, even though I swore I wasn't going to can at all this season. I give away as many as I can and I refuse to let them go to waste, so not preserving them isn't an option. Truthfully, I quite enjoy it, but it does take some time.

The flowers look better than I hoped for, especially considering the amount of hail we've had this season. They should look good like this for quite a while since we're heading into a stretch of very warm and dry weather.

Enjoy the photos of a few harvests and the flowers below. I hope to get one more final update in before the end of the season with final numbers and thoughts.

Hope everyone is still getting something from their gardens even though the season is winding down!
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