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Old 03-02-2018, 08:06 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,072 posts, read 17,587,419 times
Reputation: 22361

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Quote:
Originally Posted by FlightAttendant View Post
Thank you, OP, for your extensive list of plants. I will study it before I make my decisions for this season.

Last year I planted 6 tomato plants in my Earthboxes. they grew quite well, but I had a terrible problem with squirrels eating them just before they were ripe. It was enough to rather discourage me from planting them again. Wish I could figure a way to keep them off. I tried bird netting over the plants, but had one squirrel get caught in it and I had to free him. No more of that!

I had to free a squirrel one time out of my fence don't ask me how he got caught I don't know to this day but let me tell you he was screaming and squeeling like I was killing him and my gsd at the time wanted to eat him so bad LOL . I had to put on some gloves because I know their nails are huge and I finally got him free and you have never seen a squirrel run so fast in your life ungrateful little bugger did not even look back to thank me . LOL .
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Old 03-02-2018, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
21,005 posts, read 15,197,815 times
Reputation: 11747
You are such an inspiration OP!!

I am in your general area and have been very pleased with how well things grow here despite the comparatively short season.
Haven't decided what sorts of vegetables I want this year but you've given me lots of ideas.

Looking forward to your updates.

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Old 03-02-2018, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
16,803 posts, read 51,165,405 times
Reputation: 27531
Quote:
HC, they are very expensive - it's a serious investment to be sure. ... Some of my Earthboxes are going into their 5th season and look nearly brand new save for some scratches. They sit in uninterrupted south-facing sun year-round and really take a beating.

I think growing in containers in general is awesome and I love seeing DIY projects and the like. I will likely try some more in the future - like trying to make my whiskey barrels self-watering..

Are you using your grow boxes again this season, HC? When did you make yours? Do you use them in

I go on google images and put in container vegetables....up comes hundreds of photos that you can get ideas from...
The ones I made lasted at least five seasons in Florida. The difference in longevity between them and 5 gal buckets appears to be the amount of UV inhibitor in the plastic. My pickle buckets all developed holes. FWIW, a good exterior paint should extend the life considerably.

I may try something different this year, as the huge garden I had a few years back needed an electric fence 7' tall to keep the deer from browsing it. Living in north Alabama country is different than suburban South Florida in many ways. Instead of iguanas, I have deer, groundhogs, rabbits, and squirrels along with high winds and freezes and ground that is closer to rock than sand.

Most of my planting now is on a deck raised above where the animals can reach, and I am toying with the idea of taking four 12' deck boards and making a trough, putting end caps on, and then lining it with plastic sheeting with weep holes on one side and filling the trough with coarse gravel and then potting soil. I may use some sort of insulation on the sides to moderate the soil temps.

Last year was a variety of containers I happened to have around, most of which worked well.
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Old 03-02-2018, 10:38 AM
 
2,675 posts, read 1,760,100 times
Reputation: 5073
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlightAttendant View Post
Thank you, OP, for your extensive list of plants. I will study it before I make my decisions for this season.

Last year I planted 6 tomato plants in my Earthboxes. they grew quite well, but I had a terrible problem with squirrels eating them just before they were ripe. It was enough to rather discourage me from planting them again. Wish I could figure a way to keep them off. I tried bird netting over the plants, but had one squirrel get caught in it and I had to free him. No more of that!
With us last year, it was the &$%# birds....they'd take one bite out of each mater where no one could see it, then the entire fruit would rot. It was a baaad tomato season.
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Old 03-02-2018, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,134,612 times
Reputation: 1280
Quote:
Originally Posted by FlightAttendant View Post
Thank you, OP, for your extensive list of plants. I will study it before I make my decisions for this season.

Last year I planted 6 tomato plants in my Earthboxes. they grew quite well, but I had a terrible problem with squirrels eating them just before they were ripe. It was enough to rather discourage me from planting them again. Wish I could figure a way to keep them off. I tried bird netting over the plants, but had one squirrel get caught in it and I had to free him. No more of that!
I hear that, FA! My mom has issues with them getting into her tomatoes, too. One even had the audacity last year to sit on the back porch, staring at her through the glass door, as it nibbled a freshly picked tomato. When she tried to shoo him away, he dropped it, went to the plant, picked another one and did the same thing. She was so frustrated, but I won't lie - the story was HYSTERICAL.
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Old 03-02-2018, 11:00 AM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,134,612 times
Reputation: 1280
Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerLily24 View Post
You are such an inspiration OP!!

I am in your general area and have been very pleased with how well things grow here despite the comparatively short season.
Haven't decided what sorts of vegetables I want this year but you've given me lots of ideas.

Looking forward to your updates.

Good to see another CO gardener here, Tiger!! I think our climate is almost perfect for gardening, really, if it weren't for the hail. It used to give me more anxiety than it does now, but that's because I cover most of my garden in 70/30 shade cloth. Works great against the hail and filters the intense sun just enough to keep some things from scorching. Our hot days, cool nights and intense sun certainly do their jobs well, though!

If you haven't already, check out my previous years' threads from the original post. Lots of photos and goodies.

Interested to read how your garden does, as well, if you'd be so kind as to share.
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Old 03-02-2018, 11:06 AM
 
Location: Central Florida
3,035 posts, read 1,559,300 times
Reputation: 10126
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonchalance View Post
With us last year, it was the &$%# birds....they'd take one bite out of each mater where no one could see it, then the entire fruit would rot. It was a baaad tomato season.
I had the same thing happen to my tomatoes a few years back. I attached one of those tin foil pie tins to several of the plants. I guess the reflection of them or them moving back and forth scares the birds. You can get them pretty cheap at your local grocery store.
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Old 03-02-2018, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,134,612 times
Reputation: 1280
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
The ones I made lasted at least five seasons in Florida. The difference in longevity between them and 5 gal buckets appears to be the amount of UV inhibitor in the plastic. My pickle buckets all developed holes. FWIW, a good exterior paint should extend the life considerably.

I may try something different this year, as the huge garden I had a few years back needed an electric fence 7' tall to keep the deer from browsing it. Living in north Alabama country is different than suburban South Florida in many ways. Instead of iguanas, I have deer, groundhogs, rabbits, and squirrels along with high winds and freezes and ground that is closer to rock than sand.

Most of my planting now is on a deck raised above where the animals can reach, and I am toying with the idea of taking four 12' deck boards and making a trough, putting end caps on, and then lining it with plastic sheeting with weep holes on one side and filling the trough with coarse gravel and then potting soil. I may use some sort of insulation on the sides to moderate the soil temps.

Last year was a variety of containers I happened to have around, most of which worked well.
I never thought of exterior paint on the buckets - that's a great idea! If and when I build more self-watering containers, I'd probably go the route you did rather than buckets. They're great for smaller areas or for someone growing just a few plants, but for people growing tons of stuff like I do, larger containers are a necessity.

The trough you describe sounds like a good plan - if you go that route, share some photos - I'd love to see it.

I can only imagine the amount of work and planning it takes to keep all those critters out! I have only dealt with rabbits (and my late dog) in my garden. We have tons of birds, but they never bother anything. Bugs are never an issue and we really don't have squirrels, either, because the power lines in our area are all underground. I see one occasionally, but never in my garden. My only true nemesis is violent weather in May and June, otherwise, it's pretty easy going.
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Old 03-02-2018, 11:14 AM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,134,612 times
Reputation: 1280
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonchalance View Post
With us last year, it was the &$%# birds....they'd take one bite out of each mater where no one could see it, then the entire fruit would rot. It was a baaad tomato season.
OMG, that would make me so mad. We have a TON of birds, but they never touch my tomatoes. We have several pairs that nest annually in the eaves of our house and in the bracket securing our satellite dish, both of which are 10' from tomato plants. Crossing my fingers I get through another season with such luck!!
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Old 03-02-2018, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,340 posts, read 3,134,612 times
Reputation: 1280
Quote:
Originally Posted by budlight View Post
I had the same thing happen to my tomatoes a few years back. I attached one of those tin foil pie tins to several of the plants. I guess the reflection of them or them moving back and forth scares the birds. You can get them pretty cheap at your local grocery store.
I've heard CDs work, as well.. anything reflective. Make sure it can move and spin in the breeze. I hear they can be effective at scaring squirrels, too.
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