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Old 03-05-2018, 05:17 PM
 
Location: The Land Mass Between NOLA and Mobile, AL
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Even though we covered it, our Persian lime tree seems to have bit it because of all the hard freeze nights down here. I'm hoping it might recover because there's still some green around the trunk, but it's not budding yet.
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Old 03-06-2018, 04:20 PM
 
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I lost three rosemary plants. Nellie Stevens holly has some leaf burn.
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Old 03-09-2018, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Dual resident of BSk Indianapolis and Af Fort Worth
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I have noticed that during the average Fort Worth Texas winter, that certain species of palm trees suffer significant frond burn/brown out most winters and can often appear to be dead/unsightly in appearance by late March or early April. For example, most every winter so far in Fort Worth where my mom lives, The sago palm that my mom planted back in 2012 has suffered practically complete brown out/burn on its leaves every winter so far, I have also made note of several other more tender palm tree species in my moms neighborhood in Fort Worth Texas that looked dead after the few nights where temperatures were in the 10ís, this leads me to believe that certain species of palm tree are probably not as well suited to be planted in Fort Worth as more cold tolerant species of palm trees would be.
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Old 03-10-2018, 04:22 PM
 
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Seattle has had a surprisingly mild (and sunny) winter. We got a couple days of freaky below freezing days and slush last week. Together with the wind it was enough to burn the top layer of my coral bells and the hellebores blooms on the balcony. Periwinkles, double primroses, lavender, and mondo grasses unphased. I trimmed off the frostbitten leaves this afternoon.

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Old 03-13-2018, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 194,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Hello, I am just wondering that given the fact that least portions of the Midwest and East had a harsh winter(relative to what is average), I would like to know if your landscape plants suffered any winter damage related to the extreme cold many parts of the Midwest and East had earlier this year. Please feel free to to take note in the coming weeks/months and share if youíve witnessed any plant injuries or losses from this winter
I live in about the same zone as you do. I plant a lot of marginally hardy stuff and stuff that isn't hardy.

Palms:
Sabal Minor: fried but still alive
Sabal Minor McCurtain: looks good
Needle Palm: Looks good

Subtropical plants:
Edith Bogue Southern Magnolia: buds look dead. I might have to cut it down
Brackens Brown Beauty Southern Magnolia: Buds look good. Hopefully it will be fine
Crape Myrtles: too early to tell
Mimosa: Looks like it had tip die back, but I think will be ok
Yucca Gloriosa: too early to tell

Xeric:
Yucca Rostrata: center leaves turned brown but may recover
Yucca Elata: Most center leaves pulled out but may recover
Various cacti have rotted

Musa Basjoo: hasn't sprung up yet but too early to tell if alive.

Castle Spire hollie: a little leaf burn but otherwise looks good.
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Old 03-13-2018, 04:16 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Il
386 posts, read 194,321 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
We had a very cold winter here in coastal GA. Some things are late to break dormancy, so there is still hope, but I think that my banana trees and an oleander might have bought the farm. Otherwise, all the other plants seem fine.
Your oleander might grow back from the roots if all top growth died.
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Old 03-14-2018, 01:37 PM
 
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Winter's not over here. Just got 10" of snow last week, and 22" of snow yesterday.
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Old 03-14-2018, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Dual resident of BSk Indianapolis and Af Fort Worth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cuja1 View Post
I live in about the same zone as you do. I plant a lot of marginally hardy stuff and stuff that isn't hardy.

Palms:
Sabal Minor: fried but still alive
Sabal Minor McCurtain: looks good
Needle Palm: Looks good

Subtropical plants:
Edith Bogue Southern Magnolia: buds look dead. I might have to cut it down
Brackens Brown Beauty Southern Magnolia: Buds look good. Hopefully it will be fine
Crape Myrtles: too early to tell
Mimosa: Looks like it had tip die back, but I think will be ok
Yucca Gloriosa: too early to tell

Xeric:
Yucca Rostrata: center leaves turned brown but may recover
Yucca Elata: Most center leaves pulled out but may recover
Various cacti have rotted

Musa Basjoo: hasn't sprung up yet but too early to tell if alive.

Castle Spire hollie: a little leaf burn but otherwise looks good.
Wow, quite gutsy of you to attempt growing palm trees in a borderline 5b/6a Hardiness Zone , it appears that the Brackens Brown Beauty Southern Magnolias that I know of might have a few dead branches here and there(not bad considering that both are still saplings and are situated in a fully exposed site near the edge of a parking lot), you have got to be the first person that I know of who lives in a continental climate that had ever given palm trees a try(yes even the cold hardiest varieties), cheers to you and I would love to hear of any plant deaths when you are 100 percent sure of what has survived and what has not.
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Old 03-17-2018, 05:11 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Here are 2 things that got affected by the winter cold temps..

Holly's.




I forget the name of this one but leaves usually stay green yr round.

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Old 03-21-2018, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,441 posts, read 13,069,490 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Yes. My Holly leaves burnt (froze) to a bronze and now dropping, as well as the berries shriveled and is non edible. The Robins don't have any berries to eat.


Whats crazy is that the 2 week stretch of impressive cold temps did it. Otherwise winter wasn't bad. I don't get it. Are holly trees becoming harder to have here? This is the 3rd time this happened in last 5 yrs.
BB I feel you. To my knowledge, most hollies are not super hardy. Some of the hardiest cultivars are the "blue hollies." They take forever to grow though IMO. You can try those. The hollies I have in my yard are one zone hardier (for the most part) than my current zone, and still get winter burn.

The exception are my blue hollies, and the china girls (I think...this was before I started keeping track of my plant tags). They grow slow as heck, and seem to prefer moist areas, but they have no burn at all, if I'm recalling correctly. Ilex opaca has also been more burn free. You can check out the American Holly Society hollysocam.org

My response for OP:
1. Baby pieris died
2. ARP rosemary died
3. Baby Ironclad rhododendron died

This is out of the 20+ broadleaved evergreens I've planted in the past couple of years. For us, the past two winters have had some harsh MOMENTS, but I think they were warmer than usual overall. No more casualties for me than usual. I also try to wrap all of my baby evergreens, and learned to buy plants that are at least one zone hardier...for the most part.

The guys who died or got hurt (burned holly leaves) are subject to winter sun, wind and aerial salt in some cases. They are also pretty young in the ground. What I noticed is that my glads and musa basjoo came back in spite of the cold last year. Glads are NOT hardy here. One of my coworkers has dahlias that came back. These are not supposed to be hardy here either.

I'm looking forward to winters that are not as cold, but it seems that what we get are wild fluctuations. Super cold and super warm? So I may continue to use pine boughs and burlap to protect my plants. I'm also paying more attention to the zones...trying to pick plants that seem to be more widely adapted to heat as well as cold.

As far as ARP...I've lost that thing every year. I'm going to just buy regular rosemary from now on.
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