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Old 03-01-2018, 07:50 AM
Status: "Will global warming make indianapolis the new death valley?" (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,174 posts, read 1,570,339 times
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Hello, I am just wondering that given the fact that least portions of the Midwest and East had a harsh winter(relative to what is average), I would like to know if your landscape plants suffered any winter damage related to the extreme cold many parts of the Midwest and East had earlier this year. Please feel free to to take note in the coming weeks/months and share if you’ve witnessed any plant injuries or losses from this winter
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Old 03-01-2018, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,991 posts, read 47,321,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Hello, I am just wondering that given the fact that least portions of the Midwest and East had a harsh winter(relative to what is average), I would like to know if your landscape plants suffered any winter damage related to the extreme cold many parts of the Midwest and East had earlier this year. Please feel free to to take note in the coming weeks/months and share if you’ve witnessed any plant injuries or losses from this winter
Yes. My Holly leaves burnt (froze) to a bronze and now dropping, as well as the berries shriveled and is non edible. The Robins don't have any berries to eat.


Whats crazy is that the 2 week stretch of impressive cold temps did it. Otherwise winter wasn't bad. I don't get it. Are holly trees becoming harder to have here? This is the 3rd time this happened in last 5 yrs.
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Old 03-01-2018, 11:43 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,018 posts, read 5,798,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Yes. My Holly leaves burnt (froze) to a bronze and now dropping, as well as the berries shriveled and is non edible. The Robins don't have any berries to eat.


Whats crazy is that the 2 week stretch of impressive cold temps did it. Otherwise winter wasn't bad. I don't get it. Are holly trees becoming harder to have here? This is the 3rd time this happened in last 5 yrs.

During the 2 weeks of impressive cold temps were the skies overcast or snowy, or were they clear and sunny? If it was clear and sunny with deep freezing temperatures then the hollies may have been stricken by intense UV radiation which becomes magnified due to microscopic ice crystals in the atmosphere.

.
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Old 03-01-2018, 12:59 PM
 
4,743 posts, read 8,439,376 times
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Global warming froze some distylium plants, but they are newish to the area (n. Alabama 7B) and not tested long term (however the variety I lost were supposedly good to 6B). Now we know. Surprisingly, I saw some Camellias that were healthy and blooming the other day - I usually think that we are too far north to grow camellias (however I know that there are cold-hardy varieties).
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Old 03-02-2018, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
12,448 posts, read 10,135,059 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
...If it was clear and sunny with deep freezing temperatures then the hollies may have been stricken by intense UV radiation which becomes magnified due to microscopic ice crystals in the atmosphere...
Where's the source for that one?
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Old 03-02-2018, 04:55 PM
 
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Most of mine was dead ted.
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Old 03-02-2018, 07:15 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,018 posts, read 5,798,623 times
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Originally Posted by Dirt Grinder View Post
Where's the source for that one?

You'll have to be more specific. Source for which one? Are you asking about UV burn or atmospheric ice crystals?


.
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Old 03-03-2018, 12:40 AM
 
Location: New Mexico
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It has been too dry and I lost some plants due to that and rabbits ate some to the point that they might die. Large established trees or bushes are ok.
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Old 03-03-2018, 04:42 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
64,991 posts, read 47,321,826 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
During the 2 weeks of impressive cold temps were the skies overcast or snowy, or were they clear and sunny? If it was clear and sunny with deep freezing temperatures then the hollies may have been stricken by intense UV radiation which becomes magnified due to microscopic ice crystals in the atmosphere.
More clear days than cloudy as usual with a strong Arctic blast but you need to factor in sun angle at certain latitudes. It's not the UV that kills the landscape in winter but I'd like to see if there's been studies on that.


Keep in mind my daytime temps went into the 20s and that wont burn the leaves. 4 of the 14 days did stay in the teens during the day. It was the frigid winds and nighttime temps mostly

And I don't think there are ice crystals when the air is bone dry. I could be wrong but many times the dewpoints aloft were super dry like -30C(-22F).

Take a look at my Holly 2015 picture on the left. A deep snowpack that winter preserved the holly tree on the bottom while getting burnt with the Feb 2015 Arctic consistency... Pure indication that the cold air + WINDS kills it, not the snow.
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Old 03-03-2018, 06:26 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,555 posts, read 42,724,437 times
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We had a very cold winter here in coastal GA. Some things are late to break dormancy, so there is still hope, but I think that my banana trees and an oleander might have bought the farm. Otherwise, all the other plants seem fine.
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