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Old 10-29-2018, 08:09 PM
 
9,707 posts, read 7,654,638 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Leaf drop when first moving inside is normal. My Meyer lemon lost a lot of leaves when I brought it in, but the 5 lemons are still there and growing, and now it has 7 sets of blossoms about to open. I'll have to pollinate by hand, but the aroma is going to be great inside the house.
My lemon tree hasn't dropped any leaves since I acquired it about a month or six weeks ago, but then I moved it directly from one greenhouse to another, although admittedly conditions in the first greenhouse were warmer and more humid than is mine at present. Of course, it was warmer everywhere around here six weeks ago, so my own greenhouse was warm when the tree moved in - had to open the roof vent, in fact. Now it's about time to throw some heavy plastic over it and secure it for the approaching winter. But tomorrow should be nice, so maybe not quite yet.

I have a small tabletop fountain which I use to help with the humidity, and try to keep water containers around as well. The greenhouse gets checked tomorrow, so I'll try to report back on the progress of that one greenish yellow lemon. No sign of any new buds, though, much less blooms. Do they typically overlap with ripening fruit, as you describe above? I am a novice at miniature lemon tree cultivation.
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Old 10-29-2018, 08:13 PM
 
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As far as the citrus is concerned, lack of humidity is not a problem for them. They thrive in many areas of the desert southwest with very low humidity.
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Old 10-29-2018, 08:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
As far as the citrus is concerned, lack of humidity is not a problem for them. They thrive in many areas of the desert southwest with very low humidity.
Thanks - that's good to know. I suppose I was thinking of Florida. Most of my greenhouse plants are succulents, with minimal watering in mind, but I do have a few couldn't-resists that do require more water, so it's a balancing act. I try to group things according to their needs - very mini-climates - so one side of the greenhouse may get watered more frequently while the other dries out most of the time.

Anybody have a night-blooming cereus? I recently acquired one unexpectedly.
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Old 10-29-2018, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Texas
42,252 posts, read 49,796,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KayAnn246 View Post
I ordered a lemon tree. I would like to keep it indoors. After reading a few articles, it seems that is not the best option to produce flowers and fruit. I have a growing light and humidifier for winter conditions.

I want to keep it indoors so I don't have to worry about bringing it in and out when it gets cold as well as bugs. Has anyone grown citrus trees indoors with success? If so, any tips?
Mine did crappy and then died despite my following all the indoor instructions.
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Old 10-29-2018, 08:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Mine did crappy and then died despite my following all the indoor instructions.
It's all about giving them enough light and not over watering them. They need very good drainage. The best soil to use is the same potting soil you would use for cactus and succulents because that drains the best. In fact, we're I live, those well draining potting soils will say "Cactus, Succulents and Citrus".
Having enough light though will usually determine if your citrus will survive and even thrive indoors. You have to keep in mind they are outdoor plants, not houseplants and they need enough light accordingly.
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Old 10-29-2018, 10:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
It's all about giving them enough light and not over watering them. They need very good drainage. The best soil to use is the same potting soil you would use for cactus and succulents because that drains the best. In fact, we're I live, those well draining potting soils will say "Cactus, Succulents and Citrus".
Having enough light though will usually determine if your citrus will survive and even thrive indoors. You have to keep in mind they are outdoor plants, not houseplants and they need enough light accordingly.
Ok, I have them with good humidity and light but it's artificial since Michigan is pretty cloudy in fall and winter. I did pot them in the cactus and succulents soil. I let both dry completely where the soil is almost a grayish color. It seems to have reduced the leaf drop but I'll be able to tell in a few days. I'm think the soil may be staying wet too long. Once I move from Zone 6 to Zone 7 in the summer, I'll plant one of the trees in the ground.
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Old Yesterday, 06:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KayAnn246 View Post
Ok, I have them with good humidity and light but it's artificial since Michigan is pretty cloudy in fall and winter. I did pot them in the cactus and succulents soil. I let both dry completely where the soil is almost a grayish color. It seems to have reduced the leaf drop but I'll be able to tell in a few days. I'm think the soil may be staying wet too long. Once I move from Zone 6 to Zone 7 in the summer, I'll plant one of the trees in the ground.
Citrus generally won't grow outdoors in the ground in zone 7 which has minimum temps of 0 degrees in winter. Here's a good article with tips on growing some citrus in zone 7 but even that article states citrus won't survive temps down below the mid teens for an extended period of time.
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/gar...trus-trees.htm

Last edited by marino760; Yesterday at 06:47 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 06:34 AM
 
Location: Texas
42,252 posts, read 49,796,479 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
It's all about giving them enough light and not over watering them. They need very good drainage. The best soil to use is the same potting soil you would use for cactus and succulents because that drains the best. In fact, we're I live, those well draining potting soils will say "Cactus, Succulents and Citrus".
Having enough light though will usually determine if your citrus will survive and even thrive indoors. You have to keep in mind they are outdoor plants, not houseplants and they need enough light accordingly.
Yes.
Mine got a lot of direct light.
Floor to ceiling windows.
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Old Yesterday, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,514 posts, read 29,464,086 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Oh, dear, I would have kept the butterflies and replaced the lemon tree. There aren't as many butterflies out there as there used to be, sadly...and lemon trees are hardly endangered.

I wish you could have just picked the caterpillars off and put them somewhere else, so they'd have had a chance....
They can’t survive without a suitable host plant, and they had already stripped my hop tree bare (although it has now releafed). If my lemon tree were bigger I probably let them do their thing, but it’s small and they would have eaten every single leaf off of it.
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Old Yesterday, 07:58 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,420 posts, read 50,646,420 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
My lemon tree hasn't dropped any leaves since I acquired it about a month or six weeks ago, but then I moved it directly from one greenhouse to another, although admittedly conditions in the first greenhouse were warmer and more humid than is mine at present. Of course, it was warmer everywhere around here six weeks ago, so my own greenhouse was warm when the tree moved in - had to open the roof vent, in fact. Now it's about time to throw some heavy plastic over it and secure it for the approaching winter. But tomorrow should be nice, so maybe not quite yet.

I have a small tabletop fountain which I use to help with the humidity, and try to keep water containers around as well. The greenhouse gets checked tomorrow, so I'll try to report back on the progress of that one greenish yellow lemon. No sign of any new buds, though, much less blooms. Do they typically overlap with ripening fruit, as you describe above? I am a novice at miniature lemon tree cultivation.
This is the first time I have had that happen, so I don't know if it's common, but it's pretty cool! I'd guess that the warm temperatures inside after getting to the low 40s outside tricked it into thinking it was spring. In the past it's always bloomed outdoors in late spring, with the lemons ripening indoors in November/December.
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