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Old Yesterday, 08:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
This is the first time I have had that happen, so I don't know if it's common, but it's pretty cool! I'd guess that the warm temperatures inside after getting to the low 40s outside tricked it into thinking it was spring. In the past it's always bloomed outdoors in late spring, with the lemons ripening indoors in November/December.
Thanks, this is helpful to know.

I suppose I'll just have to see what happens with my lemon tree, and welcome any blooms when and if they arrive. I will probably keep it in the greenhouse year-round, as it's heavy and awkward to move. The greenhouse gets more shade in the summer (but has lights and outlets for more). It has a roof vent and a swing window which can be opened for ventilation (can also use a fan, but it's a long time until summer so will try to be in the moment for now).
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Old Yesterday, 09:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Thanks, this is helpful to know.

I suppose I'll just have to see what happens with my lemon tree, and welcome any blooms when and if they arrive. I will probably keep it in the greenhouse year-round, as it's heavy and awkward to move. The greenhouse gets more shade in the summer (but has lights and outlets for more). It has a roof vent and a swing window which can be opened for ventilation (can also use a fan, but it's a long time until summer so will try to be in the moment for now).
It sounds like you have a winning situation for your lemon. Just out of curiosity, does your greenhouse have heat to keep it above freezing temps in winter?
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Old Yesterday, 10:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
It sounds like you have a winning situation for your lemon. Just out of curiosity, does your greenhouse have heat to keep it above freezing temps in winter?
It's a pit greenhouse, attached to my basement but a few steps up, so gets some heat that way. I think it was probably constructed in the late 1940s. It originally had a separate little gas furnace just inside the basement from the entrance with a blower into the greenhouse - it's still in place but no longer functions (don't recall it ever being used by my parents, in fact).

It also had water in place originally, via a narrow rubber hose attached to an outlet inside the basement, but the control was at the outlet, not in the greenhouse, so it wasn't ideal. That little hose got used well into the 1960s, but eventually sprang a leak and was removed- now I tote filled watering cans from the faucets near my washing machine, also in the basement. I also keep water in containers in the greenhouse and run the little tabletop fountain I mentioned previously if the air feels dry. I need to find a humidity meter to keep an eye on things. An original thermostat is still in place and shows the temperature, though it doesn't control anything anymore.

The frame is redwood, cedar, and metal, with a concrete floor and half-wall that rises about four feet to ground level. It goes up another four feet or so above ground level. Single-pane glass, not very thick, hence the plastic overcoat for winter. I also have a small space heater in place, and in really cold weather, can move the more vulnerable plants into the basement for a day or two until the cold snap passes.

That last sentence probably answers your original question!

Last edited by CraigCreek; Yesterday at 11:30 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 10:49 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
It's a pit greenhouse, attached to my basement but a few steps up, so gets some heat that way. I think it was probably constructed in the last 1940s. It originally had a separate little gas furnace just inside the basement from the entrance with a blower into the greenhouse - it's still in place but no longer functions (don't recall it ever being used by my parents, in fact).

It also had water in place originally, via a narrow rubber hose attached to an outlet inside the basement, but the control was at the outlet, not in the greenhouse, so it wasn't ideal. That little hose got used well into the 1960s, but eventually sprang a leak and was removed- now I tote filled watering cans from the faucets near my washing machine, also in the basement. I also keep water in containers in the greenhouse and run the little tabletop fountain I mentioned previously if the air feels dry. I need to find a humidity meter to keep an eye on things. An original thermostat is still in place and shows the temperature, though it doesn't control anything anymore.

The frame is redwood, cedar, and metal, with a concrete floor and half-wall that rises about four feet to ground level. It goes up another four feet or so above ground level. Single-pane glass, not very thick, hence the plastic overcoat for winter. I also have a small space heater in place, and in really cold weather, can move the more vulnerable plants into the basement for a day or two until the cold snap passes.

That last sentence probably answers your original question!
That is indeed very interesting. I think your lemon will be just fine in there. You must let us know in the spring how it did over the winter. Don't be too concerned if your lemon drops leaves if the temps become too uncomfortable for it. That's pretty normal. As long as the plant continues to have pliable green twigs and branches during this time, it will grow new leaves in the spring with warmer weather.
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Old Today, 10:28 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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I took a picture of mine yesterday, showing a couple of the lemons and a set of the emerging blossoms.
Attached Thumbnails
Dwarf Lemon Tree-lemon.jpg  
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