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Old 03-26-2018, 12:44 PM
 
383 posts, read 115,734 times
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I bought my house coming up 2 years ago, I had 2 large trees in my yard which was quite pretty, but was AWFUL. They was sweet gums and dropped stupid large spikes balls everywhere as seeds. Anyway, I had the stumps removed and such and planted grass. I have been wanting to plant a Japanese maple or two somewhere. I am debating either putting 1 in my flower bed which I'll show in pics, or sticking 2 of them back in the old trees spots (unfortunately I have to have tree grinders come back and dig out a deep ass hole) but they said they'd remove the stumps way deep enough for $100 bucks which im fine with.


So, should I keep the yard plain with no trees and plant a Japanese maple in my garden? or should I plant some small stuff in garden and stick 2 Japanese maples in the yard replacing the old two trees. Pics below. (Also, if anyone knows if the trees will die by planting in same hole as old trees let me know) but im under assumption if I have them remove 2-3 feet of stump, should be plenty for the tree to grow in and spread out its roots.


Old pics with trees.


new pics without trees

thought about putting a Japanese maple in this flowerbed if didnt put in yard. if I put in yard, I'll fill this with nice stuff. idk yet




a mature Japanese maple, hoping to grow one of these suckers. I know it'll take forever, but got to start somewhere right? would it look stupid in my yard til its fully grown?



I planted a small Japanese maple beside my house last year, theres also a weeping one.



Also, any idea why the little bush beside my Japanese maple has those dead branches/leaves? the tree keeps growing, but those spot on it are dead. theres one other bush in my yard like that.
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Old 03-26-2018, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
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you probably don't want to plant any trees where you had the stumps removed, partly due to the soil being so loose (it will settle) and partly due to lack of nutrients available at those spots.
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Old 03-26-2018, 01:37 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Quote:

Also, any idea why the little bush beside my Japanese maple has those dead branches/leaves? the tree keeps growing, but those spot on it are dead. theres one other bush in my yard like that.

My guess is toxic water damage to the roots from being so close to the two down spouts. The water that drains off that roof and down those spouts contains pollutants from the roofing material and some of that water is going to be getting at the roots. Also, you are sheering those two bushes too short and close to the trunk. Give them a chance to grow a bit more before you sheer them again, and don't sheer them so close. If they do end up failing and you need to replace them, don't plant the replacements so close to the wall and the down spouts.

More importantly is something you didn't ask about. That big rock that you have so close to the lovely little weeping maple needs to be removed as soon as possible because it will be causing serious damage to the roots. If you leave it there it's for sure going to kill that maple. Those weeping Japanese maple trees cannot tolerate any kind of weight or compression on the ground anywhere above their thousands of delicate spreading hair roots that grow close to the surface. The health of those delicate roots is essential to the good health and spread of the tree. So if you value that tree get rid of the rock and don't put anything else on top of the soil anywhere near there, not even little rocks, not even pieces of light weight driftwood.


.
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Old 03-26-2018, 01:49 PM
 
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Will do. Theyve has the rock there for 20 years lol. Dunno why they had it there. The downspouts are all French drained 100 meters behind house. My house and both neighbors are drained into my system. I wonder if the rock under the hurt bush is killing the leaves. The weeping is real old, it got hurt my gf sheered him but I removed all the dead wood last week, he should be healthy again. Will remove it

If I removed the stump 3 feet below, it won’t be good enough to replant a maple in the spots? I replaced all the dirt and pasted it a year ago, but it i had it grounded out I will repack it down with fresh nutrient enriched soil mix.
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Old 03-26-2018, 02:02 PM
 
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OP, it appears that you haven't considered the mature size of your existing plantings and that you may be considering repeating that error. Look at the mature size of the example tree you displayed, then look at how close to the house you planted your Japanese Maples.

Also, unless you just like pruning shrubbery or the appearance of clipped shrubs, I would recommend considering the mature size of the shrubs (I'm lazy and only prune for crossed branches, damage, and health of the [plant).

Ghengis introduced a valid comment - the old spots lack nutrients. The old roots still 'eat' nutrients from the surrounding soil and they extend more than three feet. You could do it if you are good (as in estimating amounts and times) with fertilizer.

BTW, the old spots will subside as the roots decompose, so be prepared to add soil to the low spots.
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Old 03-26-2018, 02:10 PM
 
383 posts, read 115,734 times
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Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
OP, it appears that you haven't considered the mature size of your existing plantings and that you may be considering repeating that error. Look at the mature size of the example tree you displayed, then look at how close to the house you planted your Japanese Maples.

Also, unless you just like pruning shrubbery or the appearance of clipped shrubs, I would recommend considering the mature size of the shrubs (I'm lazy and only prune for crossed branches, damage, and health of the [plant).

Ghengis introduced a valid comment - the old spots lack nutrients. The old roots still 'eat' nutrients from the surrounding soil and they extend more than three feet. You could do it if you are good (as in estimating amounts and times) with fertilizer.

BTW, the old spots will subside as the roots decompose, so be prepared to add soil to the low spots.


The maple doesnít have any branches backwards towards house, only fans left to right so I planted it 4 feet from back patio. I was figuring Iíd cut any branches that grow back towards house entirely. I planted it to grow into a shade tree for the patio. The one I planted is 15 years old, I figured it would take another 20 years to become a nuisance then Iíll just cut it down and replant another one if I canít trim it back.

What would you plant in that flower bed then? Iím open to suggestions. Iím iffy on the tree in spots. Iíd like to do it but if it will die no matter what then itís wasted time
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Old 03-26-2018, 03:04 PM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
2,982 posts, read 1,709,587 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
OP, it appears that you haven't considered the mature size of your existing plantings and that you may be considering repeating that error. Look at the mature size of the example tree you displayed, then look at how close to the house you planted your Japanese Maples.

Also, unless you just like pruning shrubbery or the appearance of clipped shrubs, I would recommend considering the mature size of the shrubs (I'm lazy and only prune for crossed branches, damage, and health of the [plant).

Ghengis introduced a valid comment - the old spots lack nutrients. The old roots still 'eat' nutrients from the surrounding soil and they extend more than three feet. You could do it if you are good (as in estimating amounts and times) with fertilizer.

BTW, the old spots will subside as the roots decompose, so be prepared to add soil to the low spots.
I have to agree. Planted too close to the house. One must always take into consideration the mature canopy of a tree before it is planted in the ground.

OP. move it now, while you still can. If you break the taproot, you can still save it. It must be watered daily for 45-60 days.

*edit: I have moved many a tree this size that taproot broke, (Father In Law's place) but I had to keep it mostly wet, for new growth to start. Amazingly, one tree grew multiple roots instead of a taproot, and fared very well. It may be species oriented, but the few I moved did live.
*I know what the roots looked like on one tree after a time because my wife had me dig it up and move it---again.
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Old 03-26-2018, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Dayton, OH
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I just let out an audible *gasp* when I saw your before and after photos.

You chopped down two what-look-to-be 50-year old trees because you didn't like picking up the spikey balls?!?

We do all need mature trees to make that oxygen we so love to breathe.

When I bought my property in 2008, I had four stunning ash trees about the size of the trees in your front yard. The house was built in the early 70s, so I assume these trees were original to the development.

Slowly over the years, the damn Emerald Ash Borer has claimed every one of my big, beautiful, verdant trees. What used to be a lovely shaded property is now flat and hot and sunny and ugly.

I am sad for your trees. :-(
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Old 03-26-2018, 05:18 PM
 
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My neighbor has lived there 50 years, she remembered the trees since she was a girl, but sadly. I will not tolerate those spiked balls. I spent 10 hours raking then next day thousands more on ground. I called arborist has removed same day. I don’t want to have to deal with it. I understand they produce oxygen, but every house and yard has massive trees. I have more in back yard lol one that’s like 100 feet tall.

I just want to plant some more trees that don’t drop fruit or seeds. Any suggestions? Will pretty dogwoods survive in my front yard?
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Old 03-26-2018, 05:59 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,015 posts, read 5,795,124 times
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Originally Posted by FreedomPenguin View Post
My neighbor has lived there 50 years, she remembered the trees since she was a girl, but sadly. I will not tolerate those spiked balls. I spent 10 hours raking then next day thousands more on ground. I called arborist has removed same day. I don’t want to have to deal with it. I understand they produce oxygen, but every house and yard has massive trees. I have more in back yard lol one that’s like 100 feet tall.

I just want to plant some more trees that don’t drop fruit or seeds. Any suggestions? Will pretty dogwoods survive in my front yard?

FreedomPenguin, what is your location? It's easier to recommend trees when we know what your location (state) and climate conditions are. Depending on what the location, climate and growing conditions are, some dogwoods will not be suitable for your front yard and some others might be. Do you want trees that will grow slowly or fast? Must the trees be deciduous or will evergreens also be acceptable? Remember that no matter what kinds of trees you put in there, all of them are going to be dropping "something" that you will need to clean up off the ground with the passage of the seasons.

Also keep in mind that no matter what kinds of trees you put anywhere on your property, the size and length of branches aren't the only things you need to consider. You must also consider the size and horizontal and vertical growth of the roots of the trees. If you have any tree close to your house, including that maple in your flower bed, and near other structures on the property you may be able to prune off branches that get too long and too close but you cannot see what's happening underground with the roots. Trees that are planted too close to the house will send big roots under and into the foundation of your house, also under your driveway and any outbuildings in the back yard. They can cause structural damage to your house, your plumbing, watermain and gas lines, your drainage field, even your patio flagstones (if you have a patio) and driveway and even the street pavement can be heaved up and broken by big roots. Roots from one tree can grow and become entangled and interfere with the roots of other trees if they are planted too close together. So be careful about how many, what type and size of trees you put in flower beds near the house, the lawns or driveway and think about what will be happening underground.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 03-26-2018 at 06:38 PM..
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