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Old 04-02-2018, 08:15 AM
 
976 posts, read 280,378 times
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Interesting that the gas company concern is not the roots but the height of trees/bushes. So, if I'm understanding correctly, it's your personal choice to have the large grassy area and you only want growth along the fence.

First, you would want to take care of whatever you see the fence needs so that you don't have to worry about that for a while after the landscaping goes in. Repair, stain, seal, etc.

Be careful what gets piled up around the bottom of the wood fence because of rot.

Do leave air space when the landscaping goes in. In fact, since you have so much space, you can leave room between the landscape line and the fence for a person to get easily to the fence to replace a board, stain/etc in a few years.
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Old 04-02-2018, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Tijuana Exurbs
3,861 posts, read 10,091,894 times
Reputation: 4281
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalTwinkie View Post
I would get a landscape designer to draw up a plan. Ask yourself what do you want to use the backyard for. Create separate garden "rooms" with a walking trail to each area. These rooms should not be visible all at once. This is a very large area so having a plan on paper is very important.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
No more straight lines! Do not put the same width plantings across the entire fence - vary it by clumping groups of plants and shrubs together and let the width of the planted areas vary accordingly in curves. Possibly put a lot of plants in a corner and another group near the middle of the fence using taller plants closest to the fence and shorter ones towards the center of the yard.
Quote:
Originally Posted by petsandgardens View Post
Be careful what gets piled up around the bottom of the wood fence because of rot.

Do leave air space when the landscaping goes in. In fact, since you have so much space, you can leave room between the landscape line and the fence for a person to get easily to the fence to replace a board, stain/etc in a few years.
These three are my votes for the best ideas.

Create several separate gardens. Separate the areas with tall bush dividers. You could have the vegetable garden, the flower garden, and the juniper garden (I hate junipers... don't plant junipers).

That long fence is a visual blight. Since you can't have any trees, could you get a very large scraggily piece of deadwood and tip it over as a natural centerpiece for one of your garden pods?

And I was going to suggest the very same thing that I bolded. You have more room than you know what do with.
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Old 04-02-2018, 11:52 AM
 
3,205 posts, read 2,812,336 times
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I would make a big flowerbed from one end of the fence to the other. Make the edge curve in and out for visual appeal. You could make it look like an under 6' forest. Use some taller and some shorter bushes. Don't plant them in a line. Plant them in groupings. You can Google "bushes,landscaping'. I did a quick search and found a picture from a nursery in Wisconsin. I'm not advertising for them. These aren't your zone and I'm assuming the plants are inappropriate for your your yard.

http://www.vandeheys.com/services/re...allery/589/517

Do you see the contrast between plants and how everything is a height under 6'? I think something like that would be visually attractive against the fence. You could make it more of a nature look or more manicured depending on your tastes. It would still give you plenty of room to play, but would make it a little bit less sun baked. Also, make sure you plant bushes that don't lose their leaves in winter closer to the fence. It's ok to have some gaps. That will give you more of a year round appeal.
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Old 04-02-2018, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
10,638 posts, read 3,314,105 times
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You're in SC? I would put in a nice big pool! If you can do that.
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Old 04-02-2018, 01:27 PM
 
8,376 posts, read 7,365,888 times
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In a big share of the country, gas lines run through yards to feed the homes in a neighborhood. There are always easements for the gas lines, and in the case of underground electrical service there are also electrical easements. And yes, the gas line would go the entire length of the fence, and the same for the next property, and the next.

The reason for height restrictions, is trees require more room for roots and they go deeper than for 6 ft tall shrubs or small ornamental trees. In case of a gas line break or electrical service break, they don't want to have to cut down trees to get to the problem. Bushes are easy to get rid of, but trees are another story. And after they cut trees, they have to to dig out the stumps and large upper roots to get to the utility lines.

We have a 500 foot long and 25 foot wide easement for utilities through part of our 5 acre property, to feed 5 homes. We just let it go to pasture. We have only not had power 3 times in 13 years. Once was for an hour to replace a transformer which was planned and we were notified. Once for less than 5 minutes while they replaced our electric meter with one that can be read remotely. And on time there was a break in the line, and power was down 3 hours while they found the leak, dug down to the line, and replaced a section. We watched it from our living room, as it was in our easement area of all places. If we had plants, or shrubs over the easement, they would have just bladed them out of the way so they could replace the damaged area. And as it is an easement, we would not have been compensated for the damage done to the landscaping.

From experience I can tell you, that the easement is something that you are very restricted to what you plant. And always plant something, that you will not be financially ruined if the utility company tears if up to repair damage to the utility line. And remember they don't allow trees or anything over 6 feet tall, that can have roots go down and damage the utility line, or have to be cut down by a logging company in case of damage that needs repaired. If the roots cause the damage, you will be charged the cost for finding and fixing the problem.

In other words, you own the surface rights to your property, but the utility company owns the underground rights to your property for all practical purposes.
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Old 04-02-2018, 01:57 PM
 
976 posts, read 280,378 times
Reputation: 1427
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
In a big share of the country, gas lines run through yards to feed the homes in a neighborhood. There are always easements for the gas lines, and in the case of underground electrical service there are also electrical easements. And yes, the gas line would go the entire length of the fence, and the same for the next property, and the next.

The reason for height restrictions, is trees require more room for roots and they go deeper than for 6 ft tall shrubs or small ornamental trees. In case of a gas line break or electrical service break, they don't want to have to cut down trees to get to the problem. Bushes are easy to get rid of, but trees are another story. And after they cut trees, they have to to dig out the stumps and large upper roots to get to the utility lines.

We have a 500 foot long and 25 foot wide easement for utilities through part of our 5 acre property, to feed 5 homes. We just let it go to pasture. We have only not had power 3 times in 13 years. Once was for an hour to replace a transformer which was planned and we were notified. Once for less than 5 minutes while they replaced our electric meter with one that can be read remotely. And on time there was a break in the line, and power was down 3 hours while they found the leak, dug down to the line, and replaced a section. We watched it from our living room, as it was in our easement area of all places. If we had plants, or shrubs over the easement, they would have just bladed them out of the way so they could replace the damaged area. And as it is an easement, we would not have been compensated for the damage done to the landscaping.

From experience I can tell you, that the easement is something that you are very restricted to what you plant. And always plant something, that you will not be financially ruined if the utility company tears if up to repair damage to the utility line. And remember they don't allow trees or anything over 6 feet tall, that can have roots go down and damage the utility line, or have to be cut down by a logging company in case of damage that needs repaired. If the roots cause the damage, you will be charged the cost for finding and fixing the problem.

In other words, you own the surface rights to your property, but the utility company owns the underground rights to your property for all practical purposes.
Good explanation.
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Old 04-02-2018, 02:12 PM
 
976 posts, read 280,378 times
Reputation: 1427
Yes, an issue could be plantings having to be dug up by the gas company.

I have a few ideas. How are you on a bit of hardscape? As just a part of your landscape plan, say a bench parallel or vertical with the fence and a path out from it made of gravel or blocks or bricks laid on the soil or gravel and not set in with any mortar. Plantings, flowers... not tall...on each side. The path leading out to the lawn.
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Old 04-02-2018, 02:27 PM
 
6,121 posts, read 3,318,365 times
Reputation: 13007
Quote:
Originally Posted by petsandgardens View Post
Yes, an issue could be plantings having to be dug up by the gas company.

I have a few ideas. How are you on a bit of hardscape? As just a part of your landscape plan, say a bench parallel or vertical with the fence and a path out from it made of gravel or blocks or bricks laid on the soil or gravel and not set in with any mortar. Plantings, flowers... not tall...on each side. The path leading out to the lawn.
I'd say the last thing this yard needs is more hardness; everything about it needs to be softened, hence the foliage of varied heights and curved line suggestions.
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Old 04-02-2018, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
7,243 posts, read 9,593,264 times
Reputation: 6907
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
In a big share of the country, gas lines run through yards to feed the homes in a neighborhood. There are always easements for the gas lines, and in the case of underground electrical service there are also electrical easements. And yes, the gas line would go the entire length of the fence, and the same for the next property, and the next.

The reason for height restrictions, is trees require more room for roots and they go deeper than for 6 ft tall shrubs or small ornamental trees. In case of a gas line break or electrical service break, they don't want to have to cut down trees to get to the problem. Bushes are easy to get rid of, but trees are another story. And after they cut trees, they have to to dig out the stumps and large upper roots to get to the utility lines.

We have a 500 foot long and 25 foot wide easement for utilities through part of our 5 acre property, to feed 5 homes. We just let it go to pasture. We have only not had power 3 times in 13 years. Once was for an hour to replace a transformer which was planned and we were notified. Once for less than 5 minutes while they replaced our electric meter with one that can be read remotely. And on time there was a break in the line, and power was down 3 hours while they found the leak, dug down to the line, and replaced a section. We watched it from our living room, as it was in our easement area of all places. If we had plants, or shrubs over the easement, they would have just bladed them out of the way so they could replace the damaged area. And as it is an easement, we would not have been compensated for the damage done to the landscaping.

From experience I can tell you, that the easement is something that you are very restricted to what you plant. And always plant something, that you will not be financially ruined if the utility company tears if up to repair damage to the utility line. And remember they don't allow trees or anything over 6 feet tall, that can have roots go down and damage the utility line, or have to be cut down by a logging company in case of damage that needs repaired. If the roots cause the damage, you will be charged the cost for finding and fixing the problem.

In other words, you own the surface rights to your property, but the utility company owns the underground rights to your property for all practical purposes.
You raise excellent points and it sounds logical, but I do have a question. Why would one be allowed to put a fence up and not have to have a gate to allow for access?
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Old 04-02-2018, 04:08 PM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
2,189 posts, read 987,303 times
Reputation: 2633
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
You raise excellent points and it sounds logical, but I do have a question. Why would one be allowed to put a fence up and not have to have a gate to allow for access?
Doesn't make sense, does it.
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