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Old 04-03-2018, 09:03 AM
 
896 posts, read 250,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
I'd say the last thing this yard needs is more hardness; everything about it needs to be softened, hence the foliage of varied heights and curved line suggestions.
I respectfully disagree. The English garden look with the bench, winding path, romantic border keeping gravel in or old look block or a grass winding path but defined with border (if an old look block, just one wide)...and then those bushes either side...and all just a few feet out from the fence, coming out toward the yard even 4' or 5', and winding, not straight out and just here and there interspersed with other plantings would be nice. Different viewing spots, stopping spots for the eye and soul. Gives the illusion from the house there's more further in the path, behind the bench, and not just a fence.

Say, three areas like this among the other plantings. For resting and taking in nature after games with the dog...and soon the kids. Viewing maybe a small putting area, a seasonal badminton net, a small wood swing set.

The idea with this is soft beauty here and there....while at the same time you can dig up some of the plantings and pick up the border if the gas company gives advance notice of work being done.

HOWever, I have to say a long line of green for...how many feet was it along the whole fence...would just be another visual fence, however natural. BUT that is also a look and at least softer than a wood fence.

Last edited by petsandgardens; 04-03-2018 at 09:36 AM..
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Old 04-03-2018, 11:58 AM
 
8,256 posts, read 7,252,414 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
You raise excellent points and it sounds logical, but I do have a question. Why would one be allowed to put a fence up and not have to have a gate to allow for access?
They have the right to enter the property 24/7 anytime they need to. If they need to enter the property and there is no gate, they simply tear out enough of the fence to give them the access they need when they need it. You also cannot lock a gate, to prevent their access. And they are not required to repair the fence they have to take out.

In our situation, we have a rural 3 rail fence to set off the easement area to separate it from the lane which we also own to serve 3 homes beside our own. They have 4 different utilities, electric, gas, phone and cable easements that leave our property to take utilities to the other side of the lane, for the 3 families that live on that side of the lane. We have a 16 foot stock gate, that allows them to get to the utilities that go across the lane, which go below the gate. This gate has to remain unlocked at all times, so they have access as needed 24/7.
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:04 PM
 
8,256 posts, read 7,252,414 times
Reputation: 18038
Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post

The gas easement is confusing - if the gas lines are underground what difference does the height of a plant above it make?
For two reasons. 1)--Trees that grow higher, also have deep roots, that can damage gas lines. 2)--If they have to remove some of the trees or plants, it is easier and safer to take out a 6 foot bush, than cut a tall tree that has to be taken down in stages.
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Old 04-03-2018, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
13,357 posts, read 24,021,418 times
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I had a lot of plantings on a gas easement. They were already there when I bought the house and I didn't think a thing of it. Beautiful mature shrubbery and oleanders. Oleanders are toxic to pets so I had them removed. A couple years go by and the gas company notified me they were replacing the lines in my area and now I have nothing left. The gas company dug them all up and left me with leveled out dirt. I don't think I am going to replant even though I know the lines will most likely not be replaced again in my lifetime.

If I had your property I would probably put in a patio with a BBQ grill/outside fireplace and a seating area. Maybe do some plantings around the patio but nothing MESSY that I had to rake in the fall and clean up all the time. I would just leave the rest of it in grass and keep it easy to mow.
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Old 04-03-2018, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
7,177 posts, read 9,451,243 times
Reputation: 6860
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldtrader View Post
They have the right to enter the property 24/7 anytime they need to. If they need to enter the property and there is no gate, they simply tear out enough of the fence to give them the access they need when they need it. You also cannot lock a gate, to prevent their access. And they are not required to repair the fence they have to take out.

In our situation, we have a rural 3 rail fence to set off the easement area to separate it from the lane which we also own to serve 3 homes beside our own. They have 4 different utilities, electric, gas, phone and cable easements that leave our property to take utilities to the other side of the lane, for the 3 families that live on that side of the lane. We have a 16 foot stock gate, that allows them to get to the utilities that go across the lane, which go below the gate. This gate has to remain unlocked at all times, so they have access as needed 24/7.
Yes, that is exactly why I asked.
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Old 04-06-2018, 05:45 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,021 posts, read 42,221,076 times
Reputation: 56217
So, I believe you are just looking to soften the look of the fence and add some plants to make the yard prettier?

I think that trying to maintain a flowerbed that long would be much too difficult.

What we have done is plant a bunch of viburnum odoratissimum along our fence. They are evergreen and have a nice shape. They can get up to 12 or so, but can be pruned. You could mix in some other shrubs for color and variety here and there, like rhododendrons, azaleas, crape myrtle, and hollies.
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Old 04-06-2018, 10:56 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,339 posts, read 20,044,098 times
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OP, you know what would be really pretty and really cheap to do? Plant a bunch of different types of flowering vines all along the fence line. Anything from climbing roses to morning glories to black eyed susan vines. There's even a climbing kiwi vine with fruit you can eat. Here's a search for flowering vines for zone 7b:

https://www.google.com/search?q=flow...hrome&ie=UTF-8

If it was me, I'd get a bunch of seeds and get a bunch of peat pellets, and start a bunch of vine seedlings. Super cheap and easy. Then, transplant them out along the fence line.

If you ever need to deal with the fence, you just cut away the vines, as they're really easy and cheap to replace.

It made me think of when I lived in Mexico for a year. They plant flowering vines to cover walls and fences and they love color, so they plant anything and everything next to each other. It's just breathtaking. Even though you may not be able to keep bougainvillea growing, there are still lots of other beautiful vines that will be hardy in your zone and will love full sun.

Here's a photo I found online that shows a portion of a fence with a few different vines growing on it:

http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/2f301a751d...den-agy2dt.jpg

A lot of vines will attract butterflies and hummingbirds, too.

Some vines can be hard to get rid of later on, so if you think you may want to change the plantings down the road, just keep that in mind. Find out which vines in your area may be hard to get rid of later, if you care. Or if it may start taking over the neighbor's yard on the other side of the fence.

Last edited by NoMoreSnowForMe; 04-06-2018 at 11:06 PM..
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Old 04-15-2018, 08:46 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
1,611 posts, read 2,800,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarahsez View Post
I would make a big flowerbed from one end of the fence to the other. Make the edge curve in and out for visual appeal. You could make it look like an under 6' forest. Use some taller and some shorter bushes. Don't plant them in a line. Plant them in groupings. You can Google "bushes,landscaping'. I did a quick search and found a picture from a nursery in Wisconsin. I'm not advertising for them. These aren't your zone and I'm assuming the plants are inappropriate for your your yard.

http://www.vandeheys.com/services/re...allery/589/517

Do you see the contrast between plants and how everything is a height under 6'? I think something like that would be visually attractive against the fence. You could make it more of a nature look or more manicured depending on your tastes. It would still give you plenty of room to play, but would make it a little bit less sun baked. Also, make sure you plant bushes that don't lose their leaves in winter closer to the fence. It's ok to have some gaps. That will give you more of a year round appeal.
Thanks for the helpful post. We were thinking about installing a flower bed down the fence line, but now we may make two seperate large ones with different heights of bushes.

We just bought 10 of the "Burning Bush" shrubs. They are easily managed at whatever height we choose, and they are hardy in just about all of the U.S. These have awesome Fall color, so we'll probably pair it with something that has Spring color.

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Old 04-15-2018, 08:49 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
1,611 posts, read 2,800,739 times
Reputation: 1894
"Oldtrader" answered a lot of the gas line questions about plant height, easement restrictions, etc perfectly on post #25. I'm not going to respond to those individually, because he already explained it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
You raise excellent points and it sounds logical, but I do have a question. Why would one be allowed to put a fence up and not have to have a gate to allow for access?
I have 3 gates, including one that can fit a car through it for trailer/RV parking, etc. Last time the gas easement company destroyed my fence, they built me a new one where I wanted it for free. This gas line is inspected by air and wouldn't have anyone coming onto the property, unless there was a leak.

Quote:
Originally Posted by T. Damon View Post
This is a nightmare yard to me- excessively large, no definition, no design, no plants other than dead grass, no trees, little privacy and lots of maintenance for a place I would never otherwise want to spend time in.
Posts like these aren't really helpful. This is why I'm here asking for (useful) advice. My dog loves chasing the ball across our huge yard, so there is quite a bit of activity and enjoyment going on a lot of the time.

You're complaining that there are "no plants" and "no design", while I'm asking for plant and design advice.
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Old 04-15-2018, 09:38 AM
 
4,673 posts, read 8,363,099 times
Reputation: 3879
Oops. Burning bush is invasive and listed on the South Carolina invasive list. If this is what you bought, a responsible gardener would not plant them. I suggest returning them to the store and calling them buttheads for selling the plant.

Quote:
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
https://www.se-eppc.org/southcarolina/scinvasives.pdf

Also:

Quote:
Ecological Threat
Euonymus alatus can invade not only a variety of disturbed habitats including forest edges, old fields, and roadsides but also in undisturbed forests. Birds and other wildlife eat and disperse the fruit. Once established, it can form dense thickets, displacing native vegetation. It is native to northeastern Asia and was first introduced into North America in the 1860s for ornamental purposes. This plant is still sold and planted as an ornamental.
https://www.invasive.org/browse/subinfo.cfm?sub=3023

Besides, the plant can grow to 20', which is not allowable. Look on your State native species list:

scnps.org/
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