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Old 04-10-2018, 06:31 AM
 
6,837 posts, read 9,945,143 times
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I would have said, pachysandra, but moles love them. We had an army of moles move into our back yard, and they ate up every pachysandra root and leaf there was, in a matter of 1 week. Then, the moles left, never to be seen again.

Non-flowering: English Ivy, if controlled, would be my suggestion.
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Old 04-10-2018, 06:32 AM
 
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Art = "Vinca minor doesn't spread by seed."

Hmm:

How to Grow Periwinkles [edit - vinca minor] From Seeds

How to Grow Periwinkles From Seeds | Home Guides | SF Gate

"Excellent" ground cover? Funny it's not on Clemson's list of "recommended groundcovers" (note the Clemson .edu address):

Quote:
...periwinkle (Vinca minor) that are both known to escape “captivity” and move into natural areas.

...For more information on invasive plants see the Invasive Plant Atlas of the United States – http://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/
Groundcovers | Home & Garden Information Center

Let's see what the Invasive Plant Atlas (Clemson's reference) has to say:

Quote:
Ecological Threat
Vinca minor has escaped cultivation and is invading natural areas throughout the eastern U.S. It inhabits open to shady sites including forests and often escapes from old homesites. Vinca minor grows vigorously and forms dense and extensive mats along the forest floor, displacing native herbaceous and woody plant species.
https://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/s....html?sub=3081
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Old 04-10-2018, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,120 posts, read 7,280,661 times
Reputation: 2484
Default This is stupid

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
Art = "Vinca minor doesn't spread by seed."

Hmm:

How to Grow Periwinkles [edit - vinca minor] From Seeds

How to Grow Periwinkles From Seeds | Home Guides | SF Gate

"Excellent" ground cover? Funny it's not on Clemson's list of "recommended groundcovers" (note the Clemson .edu address):



Groundcovers | Home & Garden Information Center

Let's see what the Invasive Plant Atlas (Clemson's reference) has to say:



https://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/s....html?sub=3081
Yes, you can cultivate vinca minor from seed in a greenhouse (that's why you can buy it so cheaply).

It does not spread outside that way. It spreads through soil contact.

In fact, the danger in it spreading is to whack it with an edger and not pick up the trimmings, not from seeds blowing in the wind. That just doesn't happen.

It's perfectly responsible to plant vinca minor in an urban or suburban yard that doesn't back up to a natural area.

"Periwinkle (Vinca minor) is an excellent evergreen groundcover with dark green foliage." Periwinkle | Home & Garden Information Center
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Old 04-10-2018, 07:25 AM
 
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Art - your Clemson source is from 1999; my Clemson source is from 2013 - it seems that the thinking has evolved since 1999.
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Old 04-10-2018, 07:37 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,120 posts, read 7,280,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
Art - your Clemson source is from 1999; my Clemson source is from 2013 - it seems that the thinking has evolved since 1999.
And vinca minor still doesn't spread by seed, nor is it a problem to plant it here in SC.

It's sold all over our state, planted all over our state, and yet can only be found as a problem in one park on the border with NC where it was planted over a hundred years ago and abandoned.

If vinca minor were truly a problem (i.e. invasive) in urban and suburban landscapes, the state would be covered in the stuff. It's sold and planted all over the place around here without any issues. At all. Unless you don't like snakes, or rabbits, or ducks, or chipmunks - they all live in our vinca minor here at our house.
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Old 04-10-2018, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,120 posts, read 7,280,661 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
Art - your Clemson source is from 1999; my Clemson source is from 2013 - it seems that the thinking has evolved since 1999.
From the Clemson Cooperative extension in 2016:

Plants that Tolerate Drought | Home & Garden Information Center

So selfish!
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Old 04-10-2018, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
4,911 posts, read 4,074,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art123 View Post
And vinca minor still doesn't spread by seed, nor is it a problem to plant it here in SC.

It's sold all over our state, planted all over our state, and yet can only be found as a problem in one park on the border with NC where it was planted over a hundred years ago and abandoned.

If vinca minor were truly a problem (i.e. invasive) in urban and suburban landscapes, the state would be covered in the stuff. It's sold and planted all over the place around here without any issues. At all. Unless you don't like snakes, or rabbits, or ducks, or chipmunks - they all live in our vinca minor here at our house.
I'm with Art. There's nothing wrong with vinca minor. Certainly nothing worth a flame war.

I've had Vinca Minor in every yard I've owned. I wanted it to spread faster than it did. It is sold in flats all over the east coast. I wouldn't want to try to eradicate it, because I do think that would be difficult, but it hasn't over grown any other foundation plantings or ground covers like kudzu will. Personally I like pachysandra better, but I didn't know about the moles.

I've owned the same home for 7 years. The lot is totally wooded, no grass. The vinca minor has stayed in the original boundaries I found it in when I bought the place.

What spreads for me, delightfully, is hellebores. I had a few when I moved in, they have multiplied dramatically, even throwing themselves across gravel walkways. I wouldn't really call them ground cover, but they are a max height of 12-15", bloom in late winter/early spring, love the shade, and are super classy.

I also like Hosta...they spread somewhat, are easy to divide and replant and look nice in the shade. They are not really a ground cover.

English Ivy loves to climb trees more than the ground, so we are constantly having to strip it down off the tree trunks. I like the leaves, but it doesn't flower and does require a bit too much work for my taste.
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Old 04-10-2018, 10:04 AM
 
Location: Raleigh NC
4,911 posts, read 4,074,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Art123 View Post
From the Clemson Cooperative extension in 2016:

Plants that Tolerate Drought | Home & Garden Information Center
There are a lot of great suggestions on this list for plants of all sizes.

I do NOT recommend a sweet gum tree. Instrument of the devil.
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Old 04-10-2018, 11:09 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,145 posts, read 5,214,746 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jvpski View Post
Hello, I would like to know if anyone has suggestions for nice flowering ground cover that grows in Zone 6. I would like it to have deep roots to help hold soil sloping ground. The area has partial shade.

Thanks
I love this stuff. Red creeping thyme. It has tiny-leafed foliage and small flowers, and the roots grow deep and spread out thick and flat enough to form a mat like a cushiony felt mat. Ideal for slopes and only gets about 3 - 4 inches high (allow some +/- wiggle room on height). The foliage and flattened flexible twigs are soft and springy enough that little children could comfortably play and tumble on it with bare feet and legs without risk of getting scratched or poked.


More pictures --> https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...hyme&FORM=IGRE



Last edited by Zoisite; 04-10-2018 at 11:23 AM..
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Old 04-10-2018, 03:07 PM
 
2,036 posts, read 977,974 times
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Sasa veitchii is very good for erosion control but I guess it can be invasive too
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