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Old 04-08-2018, 12:41 PM
 
1 posts, read 595 times
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Hello, I would like to know if anyone has suggestions for nice flowering ground cover that grows in Zone 6. I would like it to have deep roots to help hold soil sloping ground. The area has partial shade.

Thanks
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Old 04-08-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
7,175 posts, read 9,443,655 times
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Sweet woodruff, and Ajuga come to mind.
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Old 04-08-2018, 02:07 PM
 
2,382 posts, read 1,263,333 times
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Vinca minor
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Old 04-09-2018, 11:56 AM
 
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Vinca minor (common periwinkle) is invasive. Responsible gardeners will not plant it.

Quote:
Ecological Threat
Vinca minor has escaped cultivation and is invading natural areas throughout the eastern U.S. It inhabits open to shady sites including forests and often escapes from old homesites. Vinca minor grows vigorously and forms dense and extensive mats along the forest floor, displacing native herbaceous and woody plant species.
https://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/s....html?sub=3081

Your local extension service, botanical garden, or garden club may have some ideas for you.
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Old 04-09-2018, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,184 posts, read 7,453,708 times
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Default I feel responsible

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
Vinca minor (common periwinkle) is invasive. Responsible gardeners will not plant it.
That's an overreaction.

Just don't plant it in or near the woods.

Our yard has vinca minor in several places (planted by a previous owner, probably decades ago), and it ain't invading a thing. It's all contained in beds or planters in the middle of a city.
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Old 04-09-2018, 01:35 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,117 posts, read 49,872,187 times
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Deeper rooted plants are those that are drought resistant, such as junipers, which have low-growing varieties. I would also suggest Cotoneaster, Bearberry, or even Euonymus, which has some prostrate varieties.
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Old 04-09-2018, 03:49 PM
 
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Art - it's such an overreaction that four states, including your home state of South Carolina, list it on their invasive species list.

So you gather all the seeds so it doesn't spread? I'm pretty sure we can count you among the selfish and irresponsible...
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Old 04-09-2018, 04:50 PM
 
Location: NC
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Well, technically ivy forms flowers, so I guess ivy in all its glory.

Pachysandra is also quite nice. Trillium is lovely once a year but slow spreading.
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Old 04-10-2018, 01:48 AM
 
2,382 posts, read 1,263,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Deeper rooted plants are those that are drought resistant, such as junipers, which have low-growing varieties. I would also suggest Cotoneaster, Bearberry, or even Euonymus, which has some prostrate varieties.
Arent those more shrubs than groundcovers?
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Old 04-10-2018, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,184 posts, read 7,453,708 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
Art - it's such an overreaction that four states, including your home state of South Carolina, list it on their invasive species list.

So you gather all the seeds so it doesn't spread? I'm pretty sure we can count you among the selfish and irresponsible...

Vinca minor doesn't spread by seed. It spreads by contact with the soil. It's risk level for spreading (on the invasive species list) is ranked as "low" for this reason. The reason it's on that list is that it was planted on some (now-abandoned) homesteads in the woods over a hundred years ago.

I've walked through the woods here hundreds of times and have never seen vinca minor (vinca major, yes, kudzu obviously).

There is about a 0% risk that the vinca minor in our yard will ever get out of our yard as long as people are living in this neighborhood. In fact, homeowners' main complaint about vinca minor is that it takes too long to grow and look full.

Clemson University and our local extension office call vinca minor an "excellent" ground cover to plant in your yard for shade. I personally like the purple flowers, but white is lovely too.
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