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Old 04-08-2018, 03:30 PM
 
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It's on the north side and only gets sun an hour or two before it sets.

Any perennials -- including flowering vines? Otherwise flower pots that could be replaced as the flowers died. I just don't want to buy new pots of flowers every week. $$$

If no flowers would thrive, are there any colorful leafy plants with or without colorful berries?
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Old 04-08-2018, 07:07 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
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You could plant annuals such as impatiens, or coleus, that come in a variety of colors and would last from spring to first freeze in fall. Very striking plants...

Then fall through winter you could use small evergreens ...something to stay green and alive when all else is gray and brown in winter.

So many different ways to fill a window box....visit a nursery and ask for shade loving plants, then choose what you like...then for winter you could plant evergreen ivy in pots...

Google window boxes images and see what comes up you like...
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Old 04-09-2018, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
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How about Amethyst or Dead Nettle. I have had a lot of luck with the Beacon Silver variety. Greenish gray and bright pink flowers and it is a perennial.
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Old 04-09-2018, 07:27 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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Perennials will get too big for most window boxes. We only change out the plants twice a year, and leave them empty in the dead of winter. In about late February/early March we put in primroses, and they bloom through the freezing weather until late April/early May when we change to either Impatiens or Coleus, with some Lobelia hanging down in the front. Usually about Thanksgiving we pull everything out for the winter. Ours face north and never get any sun at all, and those all do well.
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Old 04-09-2018, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
5,165 posts, read 7,376,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PilgrimsProgress View Post
It's on the north side and only gets sun an hour or two before it sets.

Any perennials -- including flowering vines? Otherwise flower pots that could be replaced as the flowers died. I just don't want to buy new pots of flowers every week. $$$

If no flowers would thrive, are there any colorful leafy plants with or without colorful berries?
Perennials don't really work in window boxes, they're better in the ground for a number of reasons.

The main question here is, why are your flowers dying every week?

Plant annuals once the temps are warm enough, water them frequently especially as it gets hotter, and they will last into the fall.

Begonias, angelwing begonias, impatiens (although they are prone to disease any more), caladiums, torenia, coleus, creeping Jenny, sweet potato vine...

Find a good garden center (when it warms up in your area) and go to the shade section.
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Old 04-09-2018, 04:47 PM
 
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My area is warm year round. I usually buy cheap pots of flowers from Trader Joe's and they usually last for a week or two on my steps. I just bought this from Ikea and it's perfect to hang outside of my window.

https://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/30384676/
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Old 04-10-2018, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PilgrimsProgress View Post
My area is warm year round. I usually buy cheap pots of flowers from Trader Joe's and they usually last for a week or two on my steps. I just bought this from Ikea and it's perfect to hang outside of my window.

https://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/30384676/
They will last much longer if you plant them and water them and feed them.
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Old 04-10-2018, 03:31 PM
 
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Purslane or portulaca can handle your apparent non-maintenance of flower containers. Just make sure they get some bit of water, including just the rainfall, if you aren't watering them yourself.

They prefer and do well in full sun but the 2 hours of sunlight that you mentioned would be OK also.

Wandering jew or purple queen are also heat and drought-tolerant and their hanging nature look good in containers that are in the air.

Usually for longer term growth, you will also want to replant the plants from their nursery container. That soil is not intended to be their pot for the entire season, as well as the plants could already be root-bound. The faster your plants die, the faster you'll be back to buy more --- so treat that soil that came with it, as a very temporary growing medium and get them transferred out to new potting soil asap.
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Old 04-10-2018, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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I'm in 8b. Your best bet for flowers with a shade vine plant is vinca minor or periwinkle. Coleus or nasturtiums will also give you pretty foliage. Nasturtiums will flower more in sun, but will still give you some pretty yellow/orange/red flowers and you can even eat them. They taste kind of peppery.

Nasturtiums grow really fast, and if you get the seeds for the "tall" variety, they will overflow your window boxes and hang down really prettily. I have some growing now that I started from seed, in a hanging pot and some in a pot that I'll train up a fence. They're cheap, easty to grow from seed and grow big really fast.

I also have some coleus that I started from seed in peat pellets. They are also easy to grow from seed. They'll be really pretty, but won't overflow a basket like nasturtiums or other vines will.

You could also try morning glory, but they also may not flower well without sun.

If I was you, I'd try some nasturtiums from seed first.
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Old 04-10-2018, 05:55 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,478 posts, read 5,451,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PilgrimsProgress View Post
My area is warm year round. I usually buy cheap pots of flowers from Trader Joe's and they usually last for a week or two on my steps. I just bought this from Ikea and it's perfect to hang outside of my window.

https://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/30384676/

There's a large selection of fuschia plants including trailing fuschias that would likely do well in that shady location. https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...52C35DA1688725

OP, if the plants you've been buying only last a week or two that means you are doing something really wrong with them because they should be lasting much, much longer than that. How often do you water them? Do you even water them at all?

If you want to save money and you want container plants to grow and produce flowers and stay healthy and survive a long time there's things you need to do to help them to flourish. As has already been mentioned, plants that you bring home should be taken out of the pots they came in and be transplanted into proper potting soil in much larger containers with more room for their roots to spread out. They also need to be watered regularly and fertilized and you need to remove dead flowers (called dead-heading) and inspect the plants regularly for pests so that the plants and new flowers will continue to flourish throughout their full growing season. If you don't do all of these things your plants will not survive long and you'll just be wasting your money buying more new plants to replace them.

.
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