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Old 04-13-2018, 04:00 AM
 
Location: Norfolk
1,578 posts, read 1,990,404 times
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In October, I moved into my new house, and I have been learning about the many unique plants in the yard. The house was built and owned by a Japanese native, and there are some unusual plants (including a Ginko Tree and a Yoshino Cherry Tree).

Someone told me that this was wisteria, but I don't think it is. I do have wisteria in other spots in the yard, and it has already bloomed.

As of February, this plant (shown below) was a clump of sticks on the ground, but I built a trellis and gently intertwined the plant up through the trellis.

It just started leafing out in the last couple weeks.

Any idea what it is?

I remain hopeful I didn't spend $200 building a trellis for poison ivy.







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Old 04-13-2018, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Pacific Northwest
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Those do look like wisteria leaves. I wonder if the previous owner pruned it incorrectly before selling the property. That could account for it not blooming this time around.
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Old 04-13-2018, 04:35 AM
 
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Whatever it is, it has new growth. I'd leave it and let it grow and then you'll be better able to identify it. The previous poster is likely correct, a Wisteria. I added a link below that shows the leaves. A wisteria plant is lovely.

I would definitely leave it alone. You can't know what all you have until you let a full spring, summer season go by in a new property.

Leaf identification:
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...es&FORM=IQFRML

Identifying the type of Wisteria:
https://www.doityourself.com/stry/id...es-of-wisteria

Full grown Wisteria:
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...=0&FORM=IARRTH
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Old 04-13-2018, 08:26 AM
 
2,729 posts, read 991,818 times
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I vote wisteria.
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Old 04-13-2018, 09:17 AM
 
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You certainly gave it new life.

I'm trying to figure out if there's a theme to where most of the leaves are hanging from.

Also noticing the entwined area that looks older.

And the lighter straight shoots that have tiny leaves just starting.

Are the bulk of the leaves actually coming from branches off the older entwined section?

We had an older home years ago where the wisteria growing long before we bought the house just could not be stopped by any unintended error. It didn't die from all we did with it trimming, moving old branches from broken wood trellis, etc. but it overly fast growing either.

I wonder if the previous owner had the older sections growing and trained in a certain pattern and cut the new shoots at that time. Those new ones could seem so different to you because they are so new.

I'd just water, fertilize, give it time and it could thrive incredibly pretty soon.

Last edited by petsandgardens; 04-13-2018 at 09:29 AM..
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Old 04-13-2018, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,598 posts, read 29,603,322 times
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It looks like wisteria to me, but if it’s an Asian type I’d kill it and replace it with a native ‘Amethyst Falls’ variety. Those Asian ones will sucker everywhere and are a huge headache, I battle them every year because my neighbor lets them run rampant.

Also, Chinese wisteria twines clockwise, while Japanese wisteria twines counterclockwise, so it’s looks like you likely have the Japanese type.
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Old 04-13-2018, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Floribama
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Hereís my native Amethyst Falls wisteria starting to bloom. The flowers and leaves are smaller than the Asian types, but the plant is much easier to manage and doesnít grow out of control.
Attached Thumbnails
Mystery vine in otherwise beautiful back yard...-881a724e-1833-4471-ad93-ffcaf8aebfff.jpeg  
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Old 04-13-2018, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Beautiful Rhode Island
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Looks like wisteria to me as well. However, your trellis may eventually not support it as it gets older and bigger.

If you look at the photos provided in JanND's link, you'll see much stronger trellises. Wisteria can be grown over dead tree trunks
and as a tree standard themselves. The vine requires a very sturdy structure ultimately and can tear down the side of a house.

Of course, you could prune heavily every year since it blooms on new wood.
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Old 04-13-2018, 10:10 AM
 
3,215 posts, read 2,835,264 times
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I don't anything about the differences between various wisterias. I do know I would not purposely have one in my yard. We lived in a house several years ago that had been built in the 1950's. Great house, but the original owner made two major mistakes. He trimmed the magnolias so you had to pick up debris before you mowed and had planted wisteria. The wisteria grew several feet a week during the summer. It twists around and will kill other plants. It had come up several places in the yard. We could not kill it. It's beautiful, but it isn't worth the hassle.
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Old 04-13-2018, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,598 posts, read 29,603,322 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarahsez View Post
I don't anything about the differences between various wisterias. I do know I would not purposely have one in my yard. We lived in a house several years ago that had been built in the 1950's. Great house, but the original owner made two major mistakes. He trimmed the magnolias so you had to pick up debris before you mowed and had planted wisteria. The wisteria grew several feet a week during the summer. It twists around and will kill other plants. It had come up several places in the yard. We could not kill it. It's beautiful, but it isn't worth the hassle.
The Asian ones are just that bad. My neighbor had it running all the way to the top of some 90í tall pecan trees, and it was beginning to cross over into my trees. We were talking about it one day and he told me to do whatever I wanted with it, so I cut it at the base of the tree and poisoned it with Garlon. I still find sprouts coming from the roots everywhere.

The native one isnít that bad though, it grows much slower and doesnít get nearly as large.
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