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Old 04-19-2018, 04:15 PM
 
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Do you prefer to get your trimmer repaired or just buy a new one?
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Old 04-20-2018, 03:34 AM
 
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I'll keep mine until it falls apart or is not economically feasible to repair. I get mine repaired when needed and keep it well-maintained. I have a Husqvarna that I bought from a local dealer / repair shop about 15 years ago.

I have been thinking about buying an electric trimmer when mine dies, because the performance of electric garden tools seems to have increased...
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Old 04-22-2018, 11:51 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,354 posts, read 26,627,230 times
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A string trimmer? Top of the line; would be repaired, not replaced. Although all it has ever needed is spark plug and filters cleaned and replaced. Husqvarna that is probably about 12 years old now. It gets more than homeowner use, less than commercial use.

Lovely balance on that thing. It's a lot easier on the back than the cheap ones are.

It gets non-ethanol gas and gasoline conditioner and is run dry so there is no fuel in it over the winter.
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:44 AM
Status: "securing our Northern border" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Bel Air, California
20,670 posts, read 20,890,792 times
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I've had 3 gas trimmers in about 25 years. The first two were cheapo Ryobis that each lasted about 10 years. Changing the line was kind of a pain but they generally ran pretty well. Other than plug and filter maintenance, I never had them serviced. Use whatever gas is cheapest and never worried about draining fuel or adding any additives during the winter. A few years ago I bought a Husqvarna that's far outperformed the smaller Ryobis in every way and doesn't require as frequent line replacement, I have about 300 ft of chain link fence.

Last edited by Ghengis; 04-23-2018 at 09:55 AM..
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Old 04-23-2018, 06:17 PM
 
3,762 posts, read 2,165,450 times
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I had a weed eater brand week whacker. Still works, but I'm short, and it's to sh9rt for even me. Also i have to drag a cord.

Traded it for a ryobi 18 volt lithium ion battery one.this will be the 3rd year with it.

I love my interchangeable Ryobi 18 volt lithium ion battery tools, all of them. Including the radio/blue tooth/USB.

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Old 04-23-2018, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Denver/Boulder Zone 5b
1,341 posts, read 3,168,688 times
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I haven't used a motorized trimmer in years because my partner bought a honkin' Honda gas-powered one that is frankly too heavy and awkward for me to use, so I've been either overlapping the edging with the mower and trimming by hand since 2013. I splurged for the Ego trimmer this season (along with the mower) and can't wait to use both. Lawn's not quite long enough yet, but another week or two should do it. The mower gets delivered tomorrow and the trimmer gets delivered Wednesday. EEEEEE!!!
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Old 04-23-2018, 08:19 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,941 posts, read 30,028,154 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post

I have been thinking about buying an electric trimmer when mine dies, because the performance of electric garden tools seems to have increased...
I recently bought a Greenworks rechargeable trimmer with a 4.0ah battery, and I will never go back to a gas one, its that good. It has a button for high speed, but I never even need to use it. I have a gas Echo trimmer in the shed that will be going up for sale soon.

I have other Greenworks tools that use the same battery, a 16 chainsaw and a blower. Very impressed with all of it so far.
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Old 04-24-2018, 02:37 AM
 
2,349 posts, read 2,780,475 times
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I have an Echo GT-200R. It’s a curved shaft and was purchased 9 years ago. Still runs like new. It fit the house when I bought it and is a little small for our new property, a straight shaft would work better but it still does just fine with no issue. I pickup an Echo recharge kit and use their brand of 2-cycle oil each year. One of my favorite features is the rapid loader, just have cut sections of string to put in when they wear, no bumping or hassle puck loading.

I also own a PB-259LN blower from Echo that uses the same recharge kit and oil so it makes all the tuning easier. The kits come with air/fuel filters and spark plug for about $15, the blower has been a dream for the same time period.
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Old 04-24-2018, 05:22 AM
 
12,458 posts, read 8,519,729 times
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Had my Sears for about 2.5 years. Just a simple $90 weed eater. When the batt goes i will buy another sub $100 weed eater.
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Old 04-24-2018, 01:02 PM
 
Location: D.C.
1,974 posts, read 1,648,639 times
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battery technology has made leaps and bounds over the past few years. I ditched our gas trimmer of 5 years for an electric one about 2 years ago, and will never go back. No more trying to start the thing, smelling like gas/oil exhaust, and all of that noise. The noise I enjoy the most. The ability to trim, then silence. Trim, then silence, and repeat. I also ditched my gas leaf blower and went battery powered on that too, and will never go back. The lack of exhaust stink is well worth the cost of having an extra battery pack on standby if needed for both items.


But, still gas on the mower, and likely to remain that way for a long time (.38 acre).


My son has a remote controlled car that normally runs about 35 mph. Friend told him about changing a couple of parts to run a different kind of battery called a "LiPo", and we honestly have no idea how fast it goes now, because every time he tries to max it out, the front end lifts up and the thing tries to fly off the road. I'd say that thing can probably go 80 mph from just the different battery type. It's amazing what they've done with batteries these days.
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