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Old 05-04-2018, 10:11 PM
 
4,704 posts, read 5,824,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
What kind of wisteria has red, heart shaped leaves like those in OP's picture?


.
I would not call those leaves "heart shaped". I would bet money on it being wisteria. I've seen plenty of wisterias with reddish new growth like that.
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Old 05-05-2018, 04:59 PM
Status: "Cautiously optimistic" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
32,351 posts, read 40,635,223 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
What kind of wisteria has red, heart shaped leaves like those in OP's picture?


.
I wouldn’t call them heart shaped, but the new growth on my wisteria tends to be purplish.
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Old 05-06-2018, 05:41 PM
 
802 posts, read 1,114,395 times
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I had to wait another week for the leaves to more fully develop before I could take another picture.


Please Identify Garden Volunteer-locust.jpg

It's definitely a locust tree.

I read more about it - the leaves emerge as a deep bronze red color in the spring before they turn green. It's pretty but it is a vigorous spreader, sending suckers everywhere. Exactly what I don't want in my 1/10th acre garden. One website says that it makes a "interesting bonsai project". I've never tried a bonsai before but might be interested. Or not. That's a 10 year project!

Granted the leaf pattern looks sort of similar to Wisteria, but the flowers don't look so much alike and the Wisteria fragrance is much heavier. The clincher is that Wisteria is a climbing vine, whereas this plant is a freestanding sapling.

Thanks everybody.
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Old 05-07-2018, 12:30 PM
 
22,339 posts, read 16,596,230 times
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a locust? interesting... any idea what variety of locust? i guess those leaves qualify as pinnately compound, but they don't look like any locust leaves i've ever seen.
i have a hard time getting rid of some volunteers that pop up on my property. that one i would keep if it was in a reasonable location.
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Old 05-11-2018, 05:25 PM
 
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I'm no locust expert!

However, I am very familiar with the black locust. When I was a child I lived in rural Virginia surrounded by farms that had belonged to farm families for generations, many dating back to colonial times. Locust trees were very popular with early Americans. Locust wood is fast growing, very hard and dense and extremely rot resistant. It was traditionally used for fence posts and, sometimes for furniture and farm implements. The wood has a striking grain and richness of color. Farmers loved the locust because it could be trained to grow as a hedgerow, and the seedpods are edible by livestock.

What I remember best about it are the lethal thorn clusters. Those are hard, long and very sharp. They go right through rubber-soled footwear an inch or two into a child's foot. I have a string of tetanus shots to prove it.

The saplings in my garden threw me because they are thornless. However, the locust is still a popular tree for its beauty, ability to grow in almost any soil given enough sun, survive drought, and it is very beautiful in the fall. Accordingly, thornless cultivars were developed and apparently that is what is growing in my yard.
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Old Yesterday, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Somewhere, out there in Zone7B
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Lespedezia
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Old Yesterday, 09:07 PM
 
22,339 posts, read 16,596,230 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ersatz View Post
I'm no locust expert!

However, I am very familiar with the black locust. When I was a child I lived in rural Virginia surrounded by farms that had belonged to farm families for generations, many dating back to colonial times. Locust trees were very popular with early Americans. Locust wood is fast growing, very hard and dense and extremely rot resistant. It was traditionally used for fence posts and, sometimes for furniture and farm implements. The wood has a striking grain and richness of color. Farmers loved the locust because it could be trained to grow as a hedgerow, and the seedpods are edible by livestock.

What I remember best about it are the lethal thorn clusters. Those are hard, long and very sharp. They go right through rubber-soled footwear an inch or two into a child's foot. I have a string of tetanus shots to prove it.

The saplings in my garden threw me because they are thornless. However, the locust is still a popular tree for its beauty, ability to grow in almost any soil given enough sun, survive drought, and it is very beautiful in the fall. Accordingly, thornless cultivars were developed and apparently that is what is growing in my yard.
it's not a particularly pretty tree, but it makes fantastic firewood. sure dulls a chainsaw fast, however.
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Old Today, 09:21 AM
 
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We have a honey locust. Was there when we bought the house. I think it is lovely. Simple and elegant. I have seen many photos of others as well and the look could depend on the location...sun, shade.

Ours seems to have a perfect amount of light and shade for looking the way I like. It extends it's limbs way out gracefully. Looks ethereal, not bunched up. Is a gorgeous golden in fall. It grows sort of slow but sure and ours is now large.

Just a few days ago I was once again looking at it and thinking it could be less crowded. But, then, if I take down one tree it could be too much sun on the honey locust. That one tree we have to cut shorter anyway so we'll see how it goes.

Anyway, I have thought for years if I had a front yard with nothing else planted and a good combination of shade and light, I'd love to have just a honey locust like the one I have now as the only thing in the front yard.
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