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Old 04-29-2018, 03:27 PM
 
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Can anyone identify this garden volunteer? I am clearing invasive bushes out of my garden. I might keep this one if it is manageable and not an aggressive spreader. It appeared in the mulched remains of a dead White Oak stump. It first appeared last year but did not bloom.

Appears to be sapling or bush, early spring bloomer, Mid-Atlantic, very light fragrance.

Please Identify Garden Volunteer-purple-flower.jpg
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Old 04-29-2018, 04:10 PM
 
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The leaves don't look like it, but the flower reminds me of one of my wisterias.
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Old 04-29-2018, 04:51 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Can you post a close up picture of the full open form of the leaves? And another picture of the entire plant from top to bottom? Are the leaves by any chance heart shaped and growing in groups of twos or threes? The young leaves shown are red, but are there any more mature leaves on it that are turning green, or already turned fully green?

The flowers resemble wisteria flowers but those don't appear to be wisteria leaves. However, those flowers also resemble flowers found on a good number of other leguminous plants, like certain types of vining beans for example, or rose locust, or scotch broom - with many variations of colours.


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Last edited by Zoisite; 04-29-2018 at 04:59 PM..
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Old 04-29-2018, 05:31 PM
 
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Thanks folks.

I have grown Wisteria previously and this ain't that. Wisteria blooms later, has an intense fragrance, and leaves are alternate.

This specimen appears to be a bush, not a vine, smooth bark, leaves are oppositely paired, and the fragrance is almost imperceptible. Leaves are limp and red right now.

Zoisite - I suspect you nailed it as a Rose Locust (Robinia hispida).

Anybody - Is it an ornamental that I can easily manage and train or should I root it out before it takes over?

Last edited by ersatz; 04-29-2018 at 05:45 PM..
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Old 04-29-2018, 06:42 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ersatz View Post
Thanks folks.

I have grown Wisteria previously and this ain't that. Wisteria blooms later, has an intense fragrance, and leaves are alternate.

This specimen appears to be a bush, not a vine, smooth bark, leaves are oppositely paired, and the fragrance is almost imperceptible. Leaves are limp and red right now.

Zoisite - I suspect you nailed it as a Rose Locust (Robinia hispida).

Anybody - Is it an ornamental that I can easily manage and train or should I root it out before it takes over?
Just a suggestion based on what I would do if I were in your shoes. I would want to make a 100% positive identification of the plant before deciding one way or the other what to do with it. That's why I asked for extra pictures of the shape of the open leaves and of the whole plant to look for other visible identifiers.

It might be rose locust, but does rose locust have red leaves like that when they're immature? And are the leaves on your plant the same shape as the leaves of rose locust? It might be a decorative perennial bean plant with heart shaped leaves (those leaves on your plant look to me like they might be heart shaped). Might it be a perennial Winged Bean (it has similar pale blue flowers like that and heart shaped leaves)? https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...rs&FORM=IDINTS

I'm not saying that's what it is, just that I think you should have a 100% positive ID before you decide what to do with it. If you can't get a 100% ID on it, then as a last resort I'd say try to take the entire thing up with all the roots and transplant it staked up into a big container and observe it as it grows until you know for sure exactly what it is (if it survives). It could be a rare treasure or it could be an invasive monster but you won't know that unless you give it a chance and get that ID.


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Old 05-01-2018, 02:58 PM
 
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Is there a purple rose locust? I never heard of it.
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Old 05-01-2018, 04:56 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
Is there a purple rose locust? I never heard of it.

If you do an image search online of North American locust plants and trees you'll find there are several locust species and colours as well as hybrids, including variations of rose locust found in pale rosey lavender to white/blue/lavender such as the OP posted. Most of the locust species are classified into two genera - Gleditsia and Robinia. While the genus Gleditsia has 12 species, there are around ten species in the genus Robinia. The most popular among them are Robinia pseudoacacia (black locust) and Gleditsia triacanthos (honey locust).


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Old 05-01-2018, 06:06 PM
 
Location: S. FL (hell for me-wife loves it)
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Reminds me of some form of wild indigo. I could be wrong, of course.
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Old 05-02-2018, 12:04 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
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Definitely wisteria. There is another thread about how invasive it is, but if it’s in a place where you like it, and you keep it in bounds, it is quite pretty. We have one in the back corner of our yard.
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Old 05-02-2018, 01:39 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Definitely wisteria. There is another thread about how invasive it is, but if itís in a place where you like it, and you keep it in bounds, it is quite pretty. We have one in the back corner of our yard.
What kind of wisteria has red, heart shaped leaves like those in OP's picture?


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