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Old 05-12-2018, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
39,437 posts, read 31,436,201 times
Reputation: 55142

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I'm going to go outside right now and pick some mint for tea! And maybe make some more flavored honey, flavored with just one herb. Maybe mint - it's really gone crazy lately so I have a ton of it!
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Old 05-12-2018, 07:33 PM
 
4,753 posts, read 2,814,757 times
Reputation: 16183
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
Lucky you, a Chef daughter! Did she get you into edible flowers??


Enjoy
Well, no. I think I may have gotten her into "cheffing" by introducing her to all the things you could eat outdoors on our walks when she was little.

I'll bet she's been out tromping through the woods lately looking for ramps and morels.

It sounds like a good deal to have a daughter who "chefs" but she misses a lot of holidays!

How do you like to use tarragon, greatblueheron? I make favored vinegar with it for salads, use it on fish and chicken. Just a kiss of it! Enough so people can't quite figure out what's different.
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Old 05-12-2018, 07:38 PM
 
1,532 posts, read 608,309 times
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May I suggest purple sage as an interesting herb?

I've had oregano in a large pot that's survived for years. I have some mint that has propagated in my flower bed out front. I have rosemary plants in the front and back. They do really well. I plant and tend but rarely pick for use. I like knowing our flower beds have herbs as well as flowers -- It smells great when I'm out there weeding.
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Old 05-13-2018, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
13,442 posts, read 2,652,223 times
Reputation: 19185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Well, no. I think I may have gotten her into "cheffing" by introducing her to all the things you could eat outdoors on our walks when she was little.

I'll bet she's been out tromping through the woods lately looking for ramps and morels.

It sounds like a good deal to have a daughter who "chefs" but she misses a lot of holidays!

How do you like to use tarragon, greatblueheron? I make favored vinegar with it for salads, use it on fish and chicken. Just a kiss of it! Enough so people can't quite figure out what's different.
My favorite way is chicken salad...
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Old 05-13-2018, 12:19 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,674 posts, read 5,562,620 times
Reputation: 9647
This year I'd like to plant some Olive Herb (santolina rosmarinifolia) if I can find some, and I'm always on the lookout for any rare or exotic herbs that I've never heard of before, preferably perennials.


Several of the herbs I grow for their edible flowers or seeds as well as the leaves. Over the past 5 years since I moved into this place I've managed to establish the following herbs as successful perennials or self-seeding annuals that come up every year. I do use all of them for cooking or making teas and decoctions or for sachets and potpourris:


Rosemary (several shrubs of various types scattered around the gardens)
Echinacea
Hyssop
Russian sage
Variegated sage
English lavender
French lavender
Russian tarragon
French tarragon
Curry plant
Bee balm
Lemon balm
Winter savory
Lemon thyme
Creeping red thyme
Cilantro
Parsley
Chives
Russian garlic
Chinese garlic
Oregano (wild, very hot and peppery)
Pansies
Roses
Celandine poppy
California poppy
Alyssum


.
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Old 05-13-2018, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
13,442 posts, read 2,652,223 times
Reputation: 19185
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
This year I'd like to plant some Olive Herb (santolina rosmarinifolia) if I can find some, and I'm always on the lookout for any rare or exotic herbs that I've never heard of before, preferably perennials.


Several of the herbs I grow for their edible flowers or seeds as well as the leaves. Over the past 5 years since I moved into this place I've managed to establish the following herbs as successful perennials or self-seeding annuals that come up every year. I do use all of them for cooking or making teas and decoctions or for sachets and potpourris:


Rosemary (several shrubs of various types scattered around the gardens)
Echinacea
Hyssop
Russian sage
Variegated sage
English lavender
French lavender
Russian tarragon
French tarragon
Curry plant
Bee balm
Lemon balm
Winter savory
Lemon thyme
Creeping red thyme
Cilantro
Parsley
Chives
Russian garlic
Chinese garlic
Oregano (wild, very hot and peppery)
Pansies
Roses
Celandine poppy
California poppy
Alyssum


.

...I'm so impressed...do you grow new herb types from seed?

I usually just buy transplants and don't see many in stores that are on your list.

Love bee balm for butterflies and hummingbirds.

Thanks, z
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Old 05-13-2018, 04:44 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,674 posts, read 5,562,620 times
Reputation: 9647
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
...I'm so impressed...do you grow new herb types from seed?

I usually just buy transplants and don't see many in stores that are on your list.

Love bee balm for butterflies and hummingbirds.

Thanks, z

Thank you.

If I have my heart set on a certain type of plant and can't find it already started in a nursery I would try it from seeds but I've been lucky so far and found all the above noted plants in local nurseries. That also goes for the many other plants/trees that I've introduced to the landscaping on this property. I'm fortunate that I live in a VERY diversified multicultural agricultural region of the country and there is a lot of agricultural import/export trade happening here between international nurseries from around the world because of the demand here for multicultural foods . So if I go to my favourite local nurseries and ask them to order in something new and special for me, if they can't find it from another local grower then 99% of the time they can order it in from somewhere else in this country or even from some other country (unless of course it's something that's banned to import here to Canada).

For example, last week I just received 6 young Haskap plants that were released to Canadian nurseries from the University of Saskatchewan. For the past 10 years or so the University has been developing the Japanese species of those berry bushes for the commercial berry industry throughout North America. I was very excited when the nursery manager here called me to let me know he had just gotten a special shipment in from the university and would set some aside for me. He remembered I had asked him about the haskap bushes a couple of years ago !! , which just goes to show how great it is for loyal customers to establish good relationships with the owners/managers of nurseries.

I love red bee balm for their edible flowers, more than the leaves which have a different taste from the flowers. They are delicious and full of nectar which combines so nicely with their distinct fruity-minty-peppery flavour of the blossoms. They make a wonderful ruby red tea.

Anyone who likes herbed or minted honey should try it with bee balm blossoms (the individual blossoms, not the full flower head) you will be in for a major treat, an explosion of many flavours on the taste buds. And the honey goes ruby red too.

.
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Old 05-13-2018, 04:56 PM
 
7,320 posts, read 7,767,921 times
Reputation: 7540
What other herbs can you use in tea besides mint?

What do you use to "mash" the herb in order to make herb honey? Do you cut or tear the leaves first? How long can that honey last before spoilage or crystallizing and becoming hard?

The only basil that I ever see here is sweet basil.

I'm going to try to grow some herbs in pots indoors this year. Last year, the insects got to all of them, even the basil which they normally don't touch.

Does anyone have any tips for growing parsley? I never have much luck.
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Old 05-13-2018, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
39,437 posts, read 31,436,201 times
Reputation: 55142
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Thank you.

If I have my heart set on a certain type of plant and can't find it already started in a nursery I would try it from seeds but I've been lucky so far and found all the above noted plants in local nurseries. That also goes for the many other plants/trees that I've introduced to the landscaping on this property. I'm fortunate that I live in a VERY diversified multicultural agricultural region of the country and there is a lot of agricultural import/export trade happening here between international nurseries from around the world because of the demand here for multicultural foods . So if I go to my favourite local nurseries and ask them to order in something new and special for me, if they can't find it from another local grower then 99% of the time they can order it in from somewhere else in this country or even from some other country (unless of course it's something that's banned to import here to Canada).

For example, last week I just received 6 young Haskap plants that were released to Canadian nurseries from the University of Saskatchewan. For the past 10 years or so the University has been developing the Japanese species of those berry bushes for the commercial berry industry throughout North America. I was very excited when the nursery manager here called me to let me know he had just gotten a special shipment in from the university and would set some aside for me. He remembered I had asked him about the haskap bushes a couple of years ago !! , which just goes to show how great it is for loyal customers to establish good relationships with the owners/managers of nurseries.

I love red bee balm for their edible flowers, more than the leaves which have a different taste from the flowers. They are delicious and full of nectar which combines so nicely with their distinct fruity-minty-peppery flavour of the blossoms. They make a wonderful ruby red tea.

Anyone who likes herbed or minted honey should try it with bee balm blossoms (the individual blossoms, not the full flower head) you will be in for a major treat, an explosion of many flavours on the taste buds. And the honey goes ruby red too.

.
That's it - I'm getting some bee balm and some tarragon! THANK YOU for the tips!
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Old 05-13-2018, 08:43 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,674 posts, read 5,562,620 times
Reputation: 9647
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
That's it - I'm getting some bee balm and some tarragon! THANK YOU for the tips!

Just so you know - the scarlet red bee balm varieties have the most robust minty flavours and scents, the pink varieties are milder and have a more fruity-minty flavour, and the white are the mildest and sweetest of all but still very nice. There is also vitamin C in the blossoms, and the blossoms are nice for making candied flowers.

French tarragon doesn't have a very strong leaf scent until it's heated and it has a milder, less pervasive flavour than the Russian tarragon. The Russian tarragon is quite robust both in scent and flavour and you'll find when you're cooking with it or making tarragoned honey that a little goes a long way. You'll have to experiment with it to suit your own tastes but both are very nice. I like the Russian tarragon especially for simmering in a potpourri simmering pot to scent the air.

.
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