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Old 06-06-2018, 06:40 PM
 
548 posts, read 132,952 times
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They used to be very popular. Perhaps that coincided with when we lived in very populated areas,community spraying year round, etc.

Several years ago I just could not use them seeing those poor things trapped in a bag. Haven't used them in years but a neighbor on one side does.

Are people using these still? Not that I will. Haven't even noticed them for sale any more.
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Old 06-07-2018, 05:55 AM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
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Yep, time to get the traps out, saw my first beetle yesterday.
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Old 06-07-2018, 06:47 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
32,613 posts, read 40,938,343 times
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Some say that the traps attract more beetles to your yard than you would have had anyway. In Ohio, we found that putting grub killer on the lawn was the most effective way of keeping Japanese beetles at bay. Any beetles we picked off the plants, we fed to the fish in our pond.

For some reason, we don’t have them in Georgia.
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Old 06-07-2018, 07:20 AM
 
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I've usually heard that the traps attract all your neighbors' Japanese beetles. I use a grub-killer bacteria (milky spore - apply in August but may not work in zone 5 or cooler) and that seems to be effective.

I had a bunch of Japanese beetles a few years ago and picked them off the plants, then impaled them on toothpicks as a warning to the others (just kidding). Seriously, I've had no problem since applying milky spore.
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Old 06-07-2018, 09:27 AM
 
548 posts, read 132,952 times
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I don't have time to look into nematodes this year but I think I will for next year.
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Old 06-07-2018, 10:29 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
32,613 posts, read 40,938,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
I've usually heard that the traps attract all your neighbors' Japanese beetles. I use a grub-killer bacteria (milky spore - apply in August but may not work in zone 5 or cooler) and that seems to be effective.

I had a bunch of Japanese beetles a few years ago and picked them off the plants, then impaled them on toothpicks as a warning to the others (just kidding). Seriously, I've had no problem since applying milky spore.
I was zone 5, and it worked fine.
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Old 06-09-2018, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Maine
5,945 posts, read 10,949,115 times
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Place your traps away from your valuable plants. You'll draw the beetles away from the plants and into the trap.
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Old 06-09-2018, 09:03 PM
 
12,742 posts, read 19,152,169 times
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We definitely have them in the Atlanta area, and the traps work well. Our property backs up to woods, and I hang the traps right where the grass ends and the woods begin. The bags are bulging by the end of the summer.
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Old Yesterday, 08:42 PM
 
Location: God's Country
4,324 posts, read 2,756,271 times
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Oh man, I remember the late 1940s in Baltimore when every back yard had these yellow, metallic contraptions filled with sex hormones to attract and trap them. The smell was horrific.


Then in the early 1950s we would pull them off of leaves, flowers, etc. and being the little blood thirsty bastards that we were would squish them in our hands. By the late 1950s, they were all but gone. We took credit for this feat but I guess it was DDT or some other chemical now banned that reduced their numbers so drastically.


At any rate, they never returned to the same levels as the late 40s and early 50s.
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Old Yesterday, 09:06 PM
 
3,772 posts, read 1,672,060 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calvert Hall '62 View Post
Oh man, I remember the late 1940s in Baltimore when every back yard had these yellow, metallic contraptions filled with sex hormones to attract and trap them. The smell was horrific.


Then in the early 1950s we would pull them off of leaves, flowers, etc. and being the little blood thirsty bastards that we were would squish them in our hands. By the late 1950s, they were all but gone. We took credit for this feat but I guess it was DDT or some other chemical now banned that reduced their numbers so drastically.


At any rate, they never returned to the same levels as the late 40s and early 50s.
The ban on DDT has allowed a lot of insects to make a comeback.....bedbugs for one......
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