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Old 06-11-2018, 06:28 AM
 
Location: West Central Ohio
322 posts, read 166,583 times
Reputation: 543

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My husband is redoing our backyard. He cut down three very large arborvitae's. These big trees were getting taller and fatter and damaging our stockade fence when the wind would blow. We are retired and he just cut them down branch by branch and a friend sawed the stumps off at ground level. Because we couldn't physically pull them up by the roots we are looking in ways to have plants without planting. We live in West Central Ohio and want to plant things in large containers.

What are hardy plants one could plant. At first I thought of planting boxwood shrubs but really would rather not. Would Hosta's work? Any other ideas?

Thanks.
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Old 06-11-2018, 06:20 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,337 posts, read 5,375,673 times
Reputation: 8901
You could try Lonicera caerulea shrubs, (aka Haskap in Canada and Japan, and aka Honeyberry in USA). They are very hardy, will survive northern winter temperatures down to -42C and they can tolerate wind. They won't get too big or straggly and they produce an abundance of early delicious edible berries that taste like a combination of sweet blueberry and raspberry.

https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/edi...es-in-pots.htm


I have started 6 of the Haskap shrubs in large containers just this year and so far they are doing very well in the containers. I plan to put them up in much bigger containers after summer.

If you think you would be interested here is full PDF information from the University of Saskatchewan that has more information you would need to know about Haskap bushes: http://www.fruit.usask.ca/articles/g...apinCanada.pdf

I understand there is a Haskap (Honeyberry) grower and researcher in Oregon who has started a research and breeding program happening at the Oregon State University so you may be able to get more information from there plus directions for getting the plants from the program's suppliers in USA.

.
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Old Yesterday, 05:59 AM
 
Location: West Central Ohio
322 posts, read 166,583 times
Reputation: 543
Thank you but called around and I do not see where they are selling this plant in Ohio. Or at least none close to me. I have never seen a plant like this. It is cool! Thank you for your idea.
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Old Yesterday, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
1,892 posts, read 2,496,126 times
Reputation: 3152
These folks sell everywhere...Stark Bros...Honeyberry.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old Yesterday, 07:23 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,337 posts, read 5,375,673 times
Reputation: 8901
Quote:
Originally Posted by gemstone1 View Post
These folks sell everywhere...Stark Bros...Honeyberry.

Regards
Gemstone1

That's the ticket! I looked at that site. It appears they have some really good deals, satisfaction guaranteed. They have a good selection of honeyberry varieties and I notice they have the information and recommendations about which are the best varieties to pair up for cross pollination needed in order to produce fruit. When I got my plants I selected three of the "Borealis" variety to cross pollinate with three of the "Berry Blue" variety.


.
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Old Today, 07:02 AM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
1,892 posts, read 2,496,126 times
Reputation: 3152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
That's the ticket! I looked at that site. It appears they have some really good deals, satisfaction guaranteed. They have a good selection of honeyberry varieties and I notice they have the information and recommendations about which are the best varieties to pair up for cross pollination needed in order to produce fruit. When I got my plants I selected three of the "Borealis" variety to cross pollinate with three of the "Berry Blue" variety.


.
I have used these folks for over 30 years for all of my fruit trees, asparagus crowns and berry plants, I have never been disappointed with their products, advice or guarantee.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old Today, 08:28 AM
 
Location: West Central Ohio
322 posts, read 166,583 times
Reputation: 543
Thank you. What other types of flowers go well long term in containers. I do not want fruit bearing plants. We are overrun by birds that would decimate any type of fruit. Thank you for the suggestion though

I am thinking I would like hostas. What else type of flowers do well in containers?
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Old Today, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
1,892 posts, read 2,496,126 times
Reputation: 3152
Tropical Hibiscus They are not winter hardy in your area tho', nor mine, but that does not prevent growing them, we just bring 'em inside in the winter.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old Today, 12:44 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,337 posts, read 5,375,673 times
Reputation: 8901
Quote:
Originally Posted by anitak1982 View Post

....... I am thinking I would like hostas. What else type of flowers do well in containers?

Anitak, you can grow just about anything your heart desires (even a small tree) in a container as long as you provide it with the right size of container and with all the correct growing conditions that it requires to grow in your location.

Just decide for yourself whatever kinds of plants strike your fancy the most then do the necessary research online about what container size and growing conditions are required to grow each of those kinds of plants in containers. Follow the directions given.

For example, just go to your search site and type in "growing hostas in containers" and you will get several websites come up about the best ways to grow them in containers and where are the best geographical locations for certain varieties of them to grow.

Some kinds of plants won't grow for very long term in the same container because they will eventually outgrow the container and need to be put into a much bigger container or directly into the ground, or else they will die. When you're doing research about the plants you want to grow in containers the information you find will advise you about what size of container you need, how much light and water is needed, what kind of soil and fertilizer you must provide, whether or not the plant can survive the seasonal temperatures and weather conditions in your specific climate location and what you will need to do to protect them in containers during the winter/summer. That includes advising whether or not the containers will need to be put into indoor shelters for the winter.


.
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