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Old 06-29-2018, 06:24 PM
 
6 posts, read 266 times
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Hello Gardening Friends,

Last year several Monarda "Jacob Cline" were planted in my garden. Last year they were about 2' tall and lovely. This year they grew to about 3' then flopped over and continued growing. They bloomed beautifully this year, but are a mess!

I am north of Atlanta in the mountains (zone 7a - 7b). These get a bit of shade, and lots of sun. We have had an extraordinary amount of rain this year.

Is there any hope for these? Any thoughts on why they would flop over?

Thanks for any advice you can offer!
Jenny
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Old 06-29-2018, 08:08 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,449 posts, read 5,438,598 times
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It happens sometimes if they get too tall and top heavy some years. Some of my Jacob Cline's are doing the same thing this year and it's because they were shallow rooted and I didn't cut back the ones that were getting too tall. If they're exposed to wind and the weight of rain they tip over easily if they're top heavy.

Just tidy and trim yours up a bit so the leaves that are touching the ground are removed and won't spread powdery mildew to the upper leaves. After the plants are gone dormant for winter and you've disposed of the dead material add some more soil on top of the roots for firmness. Next year if it looks like they're getting too tall again cut off the very top flowers and the new blooms will start growing lower down out of the sides of the stalk.


PS - Many types of plants will tip over if they grow too tall some years. My Mallows and Shasta Daisies usually get about 3 to 4 feet tall every year, but this year some of them have gotten to 6 feet tall and those ones are tipping over too, and then from their stalks' point of contact with the ground they're curling upwards in wave-like S-curves to point to the sun.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 06-29-2018 at 08:29 PM..
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Old 06-30-2018, 07:18 AM
 
6 posts, read 266 times
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Thank you so much for sharing your experience ... this is great information! I am headed out to the garden to nip & clip :-)

I appreciate your help! Hope it's a great weekend for you.

Jenny
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Old 06-30-2018, 07:46 AM
 
32 posts, read 3,009 times
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I found a You Tube for pruning/pinching back bee balm. Have you ever grown mums and pinched them back?

It appears that there is a tried and true method for getting a beautiful display. It is a ROBOT talking, I swear, but it is good info.

Pinch back for small gardens, starting in spring when they first appear. I suggest a pencil because it is pretty intense!

I am into natives as well. Good Luck!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ltG9cIQGbfE
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Old 06-30-2018, 08:43 AM
 
6 posts, read 266 times
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Thank you! That is great information. Looks like the job now is to tidy things up and next year I'll know how to manage them. I appreciate your help!
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Old Yesterday, 07:20 PM
 
32 posts, read 3,009 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JenBB View Post
Thank you! That is great information. Looks like the job now is to tidy things up and next year I'll know how to manage them. I appreciate your help!
YRW!

I learned my lesson with some native Echinacea. Tip was to cut back half in May. It was 6ft tall.
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Old Today, 05:54 AM
 
6 posts, read 266 times
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Thanks again ... Could I get your thoughts on this?

I am wondering if this is a good choice for my rock garden. These 3 plants are on a slope and a height of 2-3 feet will be best. Do you think cutting these back could maintain them at this height, and still have lots of blooms? Should I think about moving them to an area where they will be able to enjoy their more natural form?

I'm so thrilled that you've shared such good information with me and hope you can share thoughts on this question too.

Thanks!!!
Jenny
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Old Today, 10:35 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,449 posts, read 5,438,598 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JenBB View Post
Thanks again ... Could I get your thoughts on this?

I am wondering if this is a good choice for my rock garden. These 3 plants are on a slope and a height of 2-3 feet will be best. Do you think cutting these back could maintain them at this height, and still have lots of blooms? Should I think about moving them to an area where they will be able to enjoy their more natural form?

I'm so thrilled that you've shared such good information with me and hope you can share thoughts on this question too.

Thanks!!!
Jenny

I know you directed this question to Misty Mountains but I'll give my perspective too. Personally I wouldn't plant the Jacob Cline variety in a sloping rock garden, although I would plant one of the sturdy, bushy dwarf varieties of monarda in there. The reason being that Jacob Cline bee balm is naturally a tall, slender, loose surface rooted plant easily growing up to 4 feet tall if allowed (it wants to grow that tall) and if it's on a slope it's more susceptible than a shorter, dwarf variety would be to breezes. Wind gains more force on slopes than it does on flat ground so any kind of tall, slender, loose-rooted plants (not only monarda) on slopes are more likely to get pushed over and laid flat by wind.

So yes, I do think you should move your Jacob Clines to a flatter area with rich organic soil where they can spread their roots out and enjoy their more natural, taller form. You can still prune back the Jacob Clines but I'd suggest you don't prune them too short or that variety will go into decline from the stress of being over-pruned. Remember, it wants to grow tall. If you still want to have bee balm growing in your sloping rock garden look for one or more of the hardy, bushy dwarf varieties of bee balm for that area.

.
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Old Today, 11:01 AM
 
6 posts, read 266 times
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Thank you! This is what I think too!!!!

These were planted by a "designer" that sorta made a mess of things (I'm sick about it). Now, she's gone and I'm going it alone. I had a rock garden with much shorter plants that was fantastic when I was in Atlanta. I'm going to repeat some of these things, but have a little less light here so I'll also have to find some things that can take a bit of shade too.

Sure do wish you guys were near Atlanta and you could come by and make suggestions :-)
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Old Today, 11:33 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
5,449 posts, read 5,438,598 times
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Quote:


Sure do wish you guys were near Atlanta and you could come by and make suggestions

Once you have made a few more posts to the forum you will be able to download some pictures of the lay out of your garden areas that you want to continue developing. Then people here can ask you questions about what kinds of growing conditions you have - i.e. your present location, sunlight exposure, shade, water, soil conditions, seasonal temperatures, wind exposure, etc. - and then make suggestions and give advice.


.
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