U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Do you know or have had any trees that got struck by lightning?
I know a tree that got struck and survived for many years 15 57.69%
I know a tree that got struck and was removed before it died 3 11.54%
I know a tree that got struck but died or got diseased later on 12 46.15%
I don't know of any trees that got struck 3 11.54%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 26. You may not vote on this poll

Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-18-2018, 12:11 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
65,073 posts, read 47,417,386 times
Reputation: 10533

Advertisements

So I just got home and I had an "AH HA" moment!

Last year I had half a Maple tree die out. This spring it never came back. I was pondering what happened. Was a very healthy tree and didn't see any bugs or anything.

From May 26th
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
You think it's coincidental that the entire Maple tree died as well? Is my neighbor spraying chemicals to kill things? Is my soil turning into acid? Does the air have volcanic chemicals? (lol)

Spoiler


Then on June 16th I decided to spend the $400 and take it down.

Well... It just dawned on me......

See anything??



I am almost positive now I know what happened. LIGHTNING HIT THIS ONE TOO. 2 trees hit on my property within 1-2 yrs?

This one was like 15 feet from the home.


Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-18-2018, 12:19 PM
 
5,469 posts, read 6,142,305 times
Reputation: 13992
Had a couple of Tulip Poplars get hit a few years back. Came home to find bark and tree parts scattered over my back deck. At first I was bewildered as to what had taken place, but morning light showed the source of the damage.


Trees look similar to your spruce. Long deep vertical scar exposed by missing bark. The trees were kaput, and it became apparent quite quickly with crinkled and dropped leaves.


You can bring in an arborist, or simply watch the tree for a few weeks to see if it develops death symptoms....browning and dropping needles for example.


My trees were huge...so I bravely cut them off about twenty feet above ground where the charge had jumped from the trees to the ground and left less of a scar. With the two remaining "stumps" I built a world class tree house with a winding stair case rising to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 12:32 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,164 posts, read 39,263,926 times
Reputation: 40667
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
So I just got home and I had an "AH HA" moment!

Last year I had half a Maple tree die out. This spring it never came back. I was pondering what happened. Was a very healthy tree and didn't see any bugs or anything.

From May 26th




Then on June 16th I decided to spend the $400 and take it down.

Well... It just dawned on me......

See anything??



I am almost positive now I know what happened. LIGHTNING HIT THIS ONE TOO. 2 trees hit on my property within 1-2 yrs?

This one was like 15 feet from the home.

A bunch of firewood that needs to be split.

I think you solved your mystery.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
2,280 posts, read 932,610 times
Reputation: 4984
I've seen it go both ways in terms of tree survival when they got hit by lightening.

We had a large Green Ash tree get struck by lightening in the mid-1990s when we were living up in the Metro Detroit area. It left a line of "burn" up the center up the trunk w/ split bark and blew off one of the main branches. The tree was about 80' tall so was pretty old. Since the tree was on the right-of-way, it was owned by the city and there was a scuffle about treating it, so it didn't get any treatment. The tree did just fine and had pretty much healed itself until 2004 when it unfortunately was too far gone with emerald ash borer and had to be cut down--but then again we lost all of the large ash trees on the street.

Where I grew up there was a huge sugar maple that was hit by lightening and went on to survive many years later. It's still there on Google Street View and it got hit by lightening back in 1982.

We had a Bur Oak in Tennessee get fairly lightly hit by lightening at the top branches and that tree started to die almost immediately from the roots upwards. So much for the old wives' tale that oak trees keep lightening away ::

The worst thing I've seen happen to a tree when it got hit by lightening was when I was watching a wild electrical storm when I was about 9 years old. I had opened up the window to get a better view and to see the creek break the banks and flood. There was a tall black willow about 6 feet away from my window and it got hit by lightening. The top 1/2 of the tree exploded and I was lucky I didn't get killed ::

I would definitely get the tree looked at by a professional though if you are interested in saving it. It's hard to tell how much damage was done just by looking at the outside. Hopefully the tree was not seriously damaged, I hate to lose a tree.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
22,764 posts, read 21,813,668 times
Reputation: 27835
Is your new nickname Striker?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2018, 10:56 PM
 
9,747 posts, read 7,670,927 times
Reputation: 17612
I lost an ancient and historic hackberry that once was part of a fence row on Ashland, the Henry Clay estate on which my subdivision was built about 75-80 years ago. The tree, native to Kentucky and probably originally a "volunteer", was close to 200 years old and very tall. It survived the lightning strike but eventually fell, bit by bit, over a course of 40 years, finally collapsing entirely about ten years ago.

I had consulted an arborist as did my parents before me (this is my family home), and it may be those treatments helped the tree survive longer. Its companion tree, another huge old hackberry, is going strong still - and a young hackberry has volunteered very close to the site of the lost tree, much to my delight. Now, if I just stick around another couple of hundred years, I'll again enjoy have matching trees in my yard! The young volunteer is now about 25 feet tall and is growing well. But it has a ways to go to match its older companion.

Your tree is beautiful, and I am so sorry this happened. I hope you can manage to give the tree more years - and that it, too, might have nearby descendants to carry on its role.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2018, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
65,073 posts, read 47,417,386 times
Reputation: 10533


Update: July 22nd, 5 days after the lightning strike and unfortunately I am already seeing signs. One side is thinning out and needles are drying up, other side continues to look ok.







Wonder if I will leave it up if only half the tree dies. Not sure how that would look or if worth waiting for.







I am going to miss this scenery if its gone.

Spoiler

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2018, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Youngstown, Oh.
4,783 posts, read 7,350,071 times
Reputation: 4310
Did you talk to an arborist? IMO, the tree could still live. I don't know much about evergreens, and don't know if a bare spot could recover. But, I'd still prefer a slightly eccentric tree to no tree, if it could be saved.


I've never witnessed a tree hit by lightning. But, I once saw a tree that was the victim of a lightning strike. (well, I probably saw many, and didn't realize it, but this one was special) I was hiking with my dad, when I was a little kid. We came to a tree that had a completely bare trunk. And, laying on the ground, in opposite directions, was that bare tree's bark. It had split and peeled like a banana!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-30-2018, 07:12 AM
 
9,747 posts, read 7,670,927 times
Reputation: 17612
It appears that your tree has a double-trunk - if so, it is possible that only one trunk was struck and the other can be saved. I do hope you can preserve it.

Sadly, the ancient tree in my own backyard which I wrote about previously in this thread was damaged in the severe windstorm which struck my area on July 20 - the 70-100 mph winds brought about a third of the crown straight down, with some of it catching on lower limbs and still hanging in the tree. Power was out for about 55 hours and I was without phone and Internet for six days. Services are back now, the tree didn't damage any structures, and a tree service is coming soon to turn the hung-up and fallen limbs, which are massive, into a lifetime supply of firewood. A utility crew plus my Internet provider's repair guys will be on hand again when the tree service is here next week - similar massive damage in a nearby small historic town has kept everyone busy.

The tree had a forked trunk - now most of one side of the fork is gone, leaving a hole in the sky. But I will continue to do what I can to save and nurture what's left of this historic old survivor.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-08-2018, 10:25 AM
 
9,747 posts, read 7,670,927 times
Reputation: 17612
Update on my old tree: the tree service I had been told was excellent arrived yesterday - they took the fallen crown down, hauled off the leafy part - cut the massive trunk into chunks - and prepared to leave.

My contract says the wood would be cut into 18" firewood and stacked. This was not done. When questioned, the workmen said they didn't have the right kind of tools to cut the wood and it would take too long and they couldn't afford to do this. The contract was for the job, not by the hour.

Plus one of the workmen used some very foul language, apparently directed at a lady who was around for most for the day. She went outside a time or two to see how the job was going, but was polite and didn't interfere. I overheard the gross term, in Spanish, spoken quite loudly, but was inside at the time and could not tell who had said it (windows were open, so sound traveled). I don't really speak Spanish, but thought I knew the meaning of this ugly term, which starts with P and has four letters. I looked it up to confirm it. I was right. Previously, in the lady's presence just before they started work I had requested that they discuss how they were going to tackle the job in English, so I could understand (I knew they spoke English adequately and the foreman was fluent). Perhaps they resented that, but hey, it's my tree, my job, my yard, and I engaged this company to work for me.

I spoke with the head of the company about the massive blocks of wood which were left on my back lawn. Without seeing them, he claimed they were firewood. They probably weigh close to 100 pounds apiece, and I am not blessed with a castle-sized fireplace. I didn't bring up the foul language, which I suspect but cannot prove was in reference to the lady who had very brief encounters with the work crew - thought I'd get back to that once the job was completed to my satisfaction. The head insisted this was firewood and was very defensive - said he could get his crew to haul the wood away if I wanted, but they didn't cut firewood.

So why did the contract indicate otherwise?, I asked. Well, that's 18" wood, he answered. And perhaps the chunks are about 18" in height, measured along the trunk from cut end to cut end. But they are 50" or more around. Calling this "firewood" is inaccurate at best and deceptive at worst.

I can't burn it as is, it is not stacked as agreed, and it's not where it belongs, nor did I sign a contract for it to be hauled it away. I requested firewood, and that was the contracted agreement. At no time during the work was it indicated to me that firewood would not result or could not be cut from the fallen portion of the tree.

So what recourse do I have at this point? To me, 18" firewood indicates pieces of wood which are 18" in length - I didn't think it necessary to specify circumference of said pieces. Stacking means just that, not dumping the blocks of wood where they fell. The rest of the yard was left in good condition.

I have a call in to the head of the company which referred me to the one which did the work - he's a friend, and he can likely help me out of the immediate problem (his crew did not have the equipment to deal with my huge old tree). But I think I will dock the pay of the first company accordingly, since they failed to fully keep their end of the contract.

Really wish my community had an omsbudman for such things - not worth the bother of small claims court, but irritating as all get out, especially the use of vile language the workman thought wouldn't be understood by those for whom he was working. Perhaps calling my city council representative might help, though I'm not sure his influence would extend to the private sector. Of course I can leave negative reviews online - but why didn't they simply indicate they couldn't cut firewood to start with, rather than treat a customer so shabbily and deceptively? Add their workman's highly rude and unprofessional language to the mix, and they are very, very out of line.

Insights? Suggestions?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top