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View Poll Results: Do you know or have had any trees that got struck by lightning?
I know a tree that got struck and survived for many years 15 57.69%
I know a tree that got struck and was removed before it died 3 11.54%
I know a tree that got struck but died or got diseased later on 12 46.15%
I don't know of any trees that got struck 3 11.54%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 26. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-31-2018, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,206 posts, read 10,607,078 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kygman View Post
I had lightning hit a tree in my front yard and went through the ground to my house. Wiped out my TV, microwave, and the electronics on my stove. And my next door neighbor said when it hit (I wasn't home) he needed new underwear.
I have a large oak tree that was hit by lightening and it blew the one root out the ground. The trees is still alive after a good ten years. But I am glad our house was not that close when the bolt hit. I have a well and the pump would probably be the first to go.

Your bolt sounds expensive!
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Old 10-31-2018, 12:05 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
6,973 posts, read 12,394,879 times
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Was pretty lucky. Had insurance to cover it.
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Old 10-31-2018, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,533 posts, read 29,496,044 times
Reputation: 11934
Quote:
Originally Posted by kygman View Post
I had lightning hit a tree in my front yard and went through the ground to my house. Wiped out my TV, microwave, and the electronics on my stove. And my next door neighbor said when it hit (I wasn't home) he needed new underwear.
That happened to my grandmotherís house once. Lightening hit a huge oak tree just outside the backdoor, then somehow got inside the house and traveled across the floor from the den and through the kitchen. There was linoleum flooring and it split it just like someone cut it with a razor.
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Old 10-31-2018, 03:11 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
1,672 posts, read 635,836 times
Reputation: 3352
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post

Moisture meter reads only 17% 1 inch in. Very low especially for a Spruce. That's a percentage that is good to use for firewood. #Dry


Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Of course the lack of bark and crack where the lightening tracked could eventually cause it to die. I am curious if the application of a pruning sealer on the dead 'crack' would help slow the process; does anybody know?

Fluid flow in trees: ground water is sucked up passively by roots up to leaves, where it evaporates into atmosphere. The fluid pressure dif is supplied by the transpiration process, supplying the impetus for flow, and that flow is thru the xylem (heartwood).


The zylem is not actively metabolizing tissue for the most part and is merely a passive "pipe". The heat caused by the lightning bolt may have fried the zylem enough to disrupt its continuity. The xylem "pipes" supply different areas of the crown-- that's the major reason your pine has one dying section while the other part of the crown looks good.


The phloem (layer just inside the bark) caries sugar produced by photosynthesis either down to the roots or up to other living parts of the tree. The dying section of crown may have been cut off from this source of energy also by the lightning damage.


Whether a tree survives or not after lightning damage depends on what percentage of phloem/zylem was damaged beyond repair and how much of the crown can still be supplied with water by the remaining, good zylem.


To kill a tree by "girdling" it usually requires that you disrupt the phloem all the way around, not just partially .
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Old Today, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Prescott AZ
5,854 posts, read 8,447,698 times
Reputation: 10752
Oh my. Thank you for this thread.

I now see on my beautiful red Maple, probably 10 -15 years old, the lightning strike. It provides gorgeous red leaves in Fall and now I may have to take it down. This Fall it was a beauty but next Fall ??

I am very sad. I didn't know what it was, now I do.
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