U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-22-2018, 01:29 PM
 
4,743 posts, read 8,435,394 times
Reputation: 4009

Advertisements

Yeah, one of my pet peeves is how some people are dismissive about invasive species.

That, and litter.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-22-2018, 04:09 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,118 posts, read 10,560,296 times
Reputation: 9261
Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
^ adding to the above quote

"Fred Strathmeyer is a deputy secretary at Pennsylvania's Department of Agriculture. Strathmeyer says if it continues to spread, the pest could cause an estimated $18 billion to $20 billion in damage to agriculture and forestry just in the state of Pennsylvania alone."

They also love hops and grapes; so I guess it will all be homemade apple jack!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2018, 04:49 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,118 posts, read 10,560,296 times
Reputation: 9261
This article is running this morning on WNEP: https://wnep.com/2018/08/23/spotting...-pennsylvania/. There is something that really bothers me about that article (other than my County is in our 13 county quarantine zone); It is the brief map of PA they show in the background half way through the news article. You only get to briefly see the map and you cannot pause it and look at it carefully. It looks like a large blob of red around the location of the first sightings in Bucks County. But, what bothers me the most, is there are green dots (I presume sightings) all over PA. In other words it looks like it is way too late to stop the invasion. I could not find another map of lanternfly sightings in PA that I could look at closely. If anybody has one or has one of sightings in the US; please post the link.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2018, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,118 posts, read 10,560,296 times
Reputation: 9261
I hate to respond to my own post; I have been looking for the map in that WNEP article for some time. Here it is: Work 'ongoing' as federal, Pa. officials start plan to control the spotted lanternfly | PennLive.com. According to that our battle in PA is over; we lost and they won! Far too many of those sightings are in large State Parks, Federal land, and large open tracks of heavily forested land.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2018, 03:01 PM
 
23,873 posts, read 17,571,986 times
Reputation: 12755
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I hate to respond to my own post; I have been looking for the map in that WNEP article for some time. Here it is: Work 'ongoing' as federal, Pa. officials start plan to control the spotted lanternfly | PennLive.com. According to that our battle in PA is over; we lost and they won! Far too many of those sightings are in large State Parks, Federal land, and large open tracks of heavily forested land.
it definitely looks bad. these guys are spreading too fast to control.
like the NPR article said, they lay their eggs all over the place, including on inanimate objects like cars, which leads them quickly moving into new areas.

The Spotted Lanternfly, an Invasive Pest on the Move in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia and New Jersey. Moving Closer to Maryland!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2018, 06:31 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,118 posts, read 10,560,296 times
Reputation: 9261
Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
it definitely looks bad. these guys are spreading too fast to control.
like the NPR article said, they lay their eggs all over the place, including on inanimate objects like cars, which leads them quickly moving into new areas.

The Spotted Lanternfly, an Invasive Pest on the Move in Pennsylvania, Delaware, Virginia and New Jersey. Moving Closer to Maryland!

I just wanted to let you that I have found out that the green dots on that map represent laternflies that were reported and no insect was found! The two blue dots were locations where a dead insect was found but there was no presence of eggs. Of course the red dots are where the insects were found and confirmed.

So it is not as bad as I pictured. However we still will have a difficult time trying to contain them before they spread all over the State.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2018, 08:50 AM
 
23,873 posts, read 17,571,986 times
Reputation: 12755
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I just wanted to let you that I have found out that the green dots on that map represent laternflies that were reported and no insect was found! The two blue dots were locations where a dead insect was found but there was no presence of eggs. Of course the red dots are where the insects were found and confirmed.

So it is not as bad as I pictured. However we still will have a difficult time trying to contain them before they spread all over the State.
the blue dots are troubling because if dead insects were found at those locations, there may very well be live ones they didn't find yet. and that would add two new counties to the quarantine area, i believe.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2018, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Floribama
13,482 posts, read 29,425,055 times
Reputation: 11879
What worries me is that the article mentions they attack pines. That could be very bad if it makes its way to the South.

So far the gypsy moth hasn’t made it down here either, but I feel it’s just a matter of time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-24-2018, 07:43 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,118 posts, read 10,560,296 times
Reputation: 9261
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
What worries me is that the article mentions they attack pines. That could be very bad if it makes its way to the South.

So far the gypsy moth hasnít made it down here either, but I feel itís just a matter of time.

I saw one article that said the gypsy moths spread about 20 miles each year. I am sure though that sometimes they hitchhiked on firewood or in vehicles much farther. Pines are not preferred by the gypsy moths, but when they have a major infestation; they will eat just about anything in their way. The noise of a major infestation sounds like rain from their droppings hitting the ground. They can make roadways slick with their bodies while in the caterpillar stage.

I am actually surprised that they have not been spotted in every state in the union. I believe that they were introduced all the way back in 1867 or 1868. Of course the very first major invasion was in Massachusetts where they were released.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-27-2018, 04:07 PM
Status: "Thanks a lot MFBE" (set 21 hours ago)
 
Location: Land of the Tonkawa and Kiowa
3,902 posts, read 1,471,959 times
Reputation: 5449
Lanternflies? A type of firefly?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top