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Old 08-31-2018, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
17,356 posts, read 3,528,493 times
Reputation: 22588

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ceiligrrl View Post
well, living here in the same state as you, who can grow anything in this REDder than brick clay? I'd have to spend a fortune on peat moss, leaf mulch and loam in order to condition my clay.... i have tried unsuccessfully to just grow hostas, forsythia, black eyed susans, daisies.... EVERYTHING DIES after one year in this soil (and it's not like I didn't try to add some peat/loam/ mulch, it's just i couldn't buy enough or even go deep enough)..... have better success in my clay pots for one tomato plant, three kinds of onions, but that's pretty much all i can grow unless i want to cut down at least 20 trees out of the 300 on my property
You can grow almost anything in pots....that's what I've been doing in years past. No heavy working with soils etc.
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Old 08-31-2018, 12:51 PM
 
Location: South Carolina
13,104 posts, read 17,640,353 times
Reputation: 22444
I was very pleased this year with the tomatoes . mortgage lifters and goliath were the supreme show outs and yep I was ready for them to end . We started getting bugs too so it was time and mother nature knew it was too . I have never ever seen it this hot at the end of august beg September . Global warming I guess . I wont be doing a winter garden because of too much going on at the end of the year holidays etc ….time to plan next years garden and thinking about what to plant .
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Old 08-31-2018, 08:37 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
1,690 posts, read 664,786 times
Reputation: 4598
My ďgardenĒ this year was a total disaster. This was my 1st attempt to grow anything here in zone 10 after six decades of growing a big garden in zone 5. My two tomato and two pepper plant trial didnít produce much of anything. So Iím using this as a learning experience. Since I wonít ever be planting a large garden again I will plant my tomatoís and peppers in pots where I can easily manage the sun, soil, and water.

The other thing I had to learn was that I needed to forget much of what I knew about vegetable gardening up north. Itís a whole different world here with the heat and humidity. All in all, itís all good to be learning new things.
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Old 08-31-2018, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,718 posts, read 20,456,636 times
Reputation: 30701
I only have a small balcony now and some indoor grow lights. Through trial and error, I discovered that basil loves the indoor bed under the grow lights. I have 3 varieties and I love having lots of fresh basil whenever I want it. I've got them in a big Rubbermaid tote that I drilled holes in the bottom of, and it's on a big plastic garden tray.

Tomatoes were really slow to start on my balcony. We had a very cool spring and it's already getting cool again. Very unusually cool summer weather here. But, once the tomatoes took off, they took over my balcony! Grew so tall, they then fell over. It's like a tomato archway out on the balcony. I grew cherries - a sun gold variety and a sweet red one. Once they started, they went crazy. I'm still getting lots of tomatoes. But, they're really tiny! Super sweet but really tiny. Weird.

I took a big bowl of them to a picnic with some international students this last week and the girls from China were enthralled and asked me where I bought the tiny tomatoes lol. Most of them are around the size of a marble. The package said they were supposed to be 1-1/2" in diameter, but that's not what they did on my balcony. They're fun for just popping in your mouth, but it's too much work to cut them for salads or anything else.

The problem is probably because they were way too crowded. I got greedy and planted too many in a small space.

You all are making me think I should try Purple Cherokee's next year.

For my winter indoor garden - I'm adding another tote and grow lights and I am thinking I'll try growing some bok choy. Greens do well under the grow lights, but the lights I have aren't strong enough to grow anything with fruit. Tried tomatoes and peppers and they were a fail - indoors.
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Old 09-02-2018, 09:31 AM
 
Location: The Mitten
751 posts, read 1,064,111 times
Reputation: 550
This was my first year to have my own garden to take care of. I grew most of my plants from seed and I started at the best time for my location, but I had to wait a bit to create my garden outside.

I have about five or six pepper plants - big Thai hybrid, habanero, are what leftover seeds I could find - I forget the others. I also have about six different tomato plants that are still growing strong and creating new blooms. The tomatoes I have: 1 super sauce roma, two to three normal roma tomatoes, and two "Delicious" tomatoes (they look similar to Early Girl tomatoes).

Obviously, I have some work to do for next year, perhaps better organization and labeling. Also, I want another raised bed next to my current (one) raised bed, and really expand my garden.
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Old 09-02-2018, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
17,356 posts, read 3,528,493 times
Reputation: 22588
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitopcat View Post
This was my first year to have my own garden to take care of. I grew most of my plants from seed and I started at the best time for my location, but I had to wait a bit to create my garden outside.

I have about five or six pepper plants - big Thai hybrid, habanero, are what leftover seeds I could find - I forget the others. I also have about six different tomato plants that are still growing strong and creating new blooms. The tomatoes I have: 1 super sauce roma, two to three normal roma tomatoes, and two "Delicious" tomatoes (they look similar to Early Girl tomatoes).

Obviously, I have some work to do for next year, perhaps better organization and labeling. Also, I want another raised bed next to my current (one) raised bed, and really expand my garden.

Congratulations! You've gotten the vegetable garden bug....

No matter what happens, you learn. And there's always next year...planning is half the fun.
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Old 09-06-2018, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
7,243 posts, read 9,593,264 times
Reputation: 6902
I decided to try a grow bag this year from Amazon. I got 5 bags for around $10. The weeds here are just crazy, and I was tired of trying to squeeze between cukes and tomatoes to weed. I simply wrapped landscape cloth around several collapsed cardboard boxes and covered the ground with the wrapped cardboard. Then filled the grow bags. I had cukes, tomatoes, peppers and cantaloupes. The cukes were the only things that didn't do very well. We did have a problem early on as we were very wet in June and I thought that the roots may have rotted but the cukes did rally toward the middle of August. IT was crazy out of these little bags.

I actually saved a lot of money too. I only had to fill the grow bags with dirt which was a lot better than the garden. .I always rotate the soil in the garden to the flowers and start the veggies "new". Just a thought.

The fabric cut down almost all the weeding except at the very corners, where they just snuck in.
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Old 09-06-2018, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Nantahala National Forest, NC
17,356 posts, read 3,528,493 times
Reputation: 22588
Quote:
Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
I decided to try a grow bag this year from Amazon. I got 5 bags for around $10. The weeds here are just crazy, and I was tired of trying to squeeze between cukes and tomatoes to weed. I simply wrapped landscape cloth around several collapsed cardboard boxes and covered the ground with the wrapped cardboard. Then filled the grow bags. I had cukes, tomatoes, peppers and cantaloupes. The cukes were the only things that didn't do very well. We did have a problem early on as we were very wet in June and I thought that the roots may have rotted but the cukes did rally toward the middle of August. IT was crazy out of these little bags.

I actually saved a lot of money too. I only had to fill the grow bags with dirt which was a lot better than the garden. .I always rotate the soil in the garden to the flowers and start the veggies "new". Just a thought.

The fabric cut down almost all the weeding except at the very corners, where they just snuck in.

Great!

I've used the bags too, so much easier....
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Old 09-06-2018, 01:18 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
14,933 posts, read 16,527,617 times
Reputation: 28705
My garden is just ramping up because of a hailstorm that crushed my crops about 5 weeks ago. First frost isn't until October, though so I am hoping my heirloom German Queen tomatoes, that have just started to set, will ripen up. On the positive side, I am drowning in cherry tomatoes of several varieties.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ceiligrrl View Post
well, living here in the same state as you, who can grow anything in this REDder than brick clay? I'd have to spend a fortune on peat moss, leaf mulch and loam in order to condition my clay....
My soil is also clay, including caliche which is clay that is basically turning to rock. Raised beds are my solution. I have about 10 inches of topsoil/gardensoil over the clay which not only provides a great start for the roots, but it keeps the underlaying clay from drying out so that the roots can penetrate (and crops do like wet clay).

I do nothing to the natural clay soil, no diggin, nothing. Just pile good, soft, aerated, rich humus on top and plant in that.
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Old 09-12-2018, 08:19 PM
 
831 posts, read 326,181 times
Reputation: 817
Quote:
Originally Posted by greatblueheron View Post
My one Purple Cherokee tomato did great, good size fruit, sweet. Many many a tomato pie.

The Patios, on the other hand, well they got only half day sun so still many green ones on the vines. Will not plant these again. Some of the herbs have conked out already...I didn't have much of a garden this year.

Are you happy with this year's garden?

No, I am not. I am in zone 7, North East...........has rained almost every other day........HUMIDITY in the 80's, along with BRUTAL HEAT in the 90's, straight for over two months...... so I have every possible disease one can imagine.......!!!
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