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Old 09-10-2018, 07:12 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
33,928 posts, read 42,118,581 times
Reputation: 56009

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We had a mishmash of 3 styles of fencing in our back yard. We opted to match and continue one style to cover the bright white vinyl and the remainder which was much like yours. We were actually the bad neighbors in this case, because some heavy limbs from our 2 Bradford pears had damaged the vinyl fence.

After removing the trees, my husband, who likes a good project, spent a whole summer replicating the fence. He enjoyed it and it turned out beautiful. The fence would have been expensive, so if you aren’t handy or want a quick result, you could hire it done. I think we really improved our property value.

This is the outside, before all the old fence came down.
Attached Thumbnails
Neighbors volunteer tree is pushing over their fence-5c847567-ab99-4efe-a836-d718fe5370aa.jpeg  
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Old 09-10-2018, 07:44 AM
 
48,288 posts, read 38,915,466 times
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Mullberries....there was a tree like that in our neighborhood when I was a kid and the birds would poop white\purple all over the cars in the vicinity as a result.
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Old 09-10-2018, 10:58 AM
 
3,076 posts, read 1,788,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
We had a mishmash of 3 styles of fencing in our back yard. We opted to match and continue one style to cover the bright white vinyl and the remainder which was much like yours. We were actually the bad neighbors in this case, because some heavy limbs from our 2 Bradford pears had damaged the vinyl fence.

After removing the trees, my husband, who likes a good project, spent a whole summer replicating the fence. He enjoyed it and it turned out beautiful. The fence would have been expensive, so if you aren’t handy or want a quick result, you could hire it done. I think we really improved our property value.

This is the outside, before all the old fence came down.
Bad neighbor!!! LOL!!!! One of my neighbors has one topped very similar and it looks great. Another neighbor did the entire side yard in about 2 weeks after work, building it by hand. We were amazed! He is so quiet too, we'd look outside the next morning and see a couple more sections up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Mullberries....there was a tree like that in our neighborhood when I was a kid and the birds would poop white\purple all over the cars in the vicinity as a result.
Add pokeweed berries to that mess - oh joy!
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Old 09-10-2018, 01:23 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
33,928 posts, read 42,118,581 times
Reputation: 56009
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mathguy View Post
Mullberries....there was a tree like that in our neighborhood when I was a kid and the birds would poop white\purple all over the cars in the vicinity as a result.
Learned the hard way when we wondered why we got such a nice shady parking spot at a hotel once.

At a Shaker Village they had several huge mulberry trees which the white draft horses loved to eat. The horses got stained with purple streaks.
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Old 09-10-2018, 04:18 PM
 
321 posts, read 79,032 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WouldLoveTo View Post
After dealing with mulberries, pokeweed, creeping charlie, bindweed and bittersweet - most of which has come from neighbors yards - I have promised myself I will never plant an invasive species no matter how much I like it. I've invested way too much time and energy cleaning up messes from those things.
OMG, can I ever relate!! We saw this house in midwinter and so other than the woody stuff had no idea what was on the property other than the realtor and sellers making a big deal of the sellers being gardeners. I figured hey, there may be some really nice perennials to discover when we move in, right?

Fast forward to the closing which took place (almost five months worth of delays on their part, yeesh). Know what we saw then?

They had deliberately planted, in all five of the raised beds, the following: Chameleon plant (Houttonyia cordata), yellow archangel (Lamium galeobdolon), tiger lilies, common orange daylilies (aka ditch lilies), variegated ribbon grass (Phalaris), and in one bed, blue lyme grass. That's in addition to the vinca and pachysandra of course. And the English ivy invading from the neighbor's yard. Four of the raised beds also had some really nice creeping phlox which of course had been invaded by everything else.

In addition to those insane deliberate plantings: bittersweet, wild blackberry, Joe Pye weed, mugwort, bishops weed/goutweed (the green version which is even worse), solanum, and of course crabgrass. Three years later I'm still battling all of those.

The tipping point came this spring when we suddenly started finding poison ivy everywhere, including in the beds and the so-called lawn. Hired someone to rip everything out of the five planting beds this June, right down to bare soil. I will be spraying herbicide over those beds for at least the next year, probably two, before I risk replanting them. We may try solarizing the beds next summer. Still need to have the men come back and rip out the remaining three planting beds which we didn't realize also have poison ivy. Desperate times call for desperate measures.

I swear I could deal with almost anything else except having the poison ivy in the mix. I look back to my last garden when I used to complain about having to constantly fight the wild garlic (Allium) and the solanum. Those were the only two pest plants I had there. Never realized how easy I had it, LOL.

ETA: I forgot about the Rose of Sharons. Yes, plural. They had deliberately planted a half dozen of the miserable things, which seeded EVERYWHERE. We had them dug out this year too, after I got sick of cutting them all down to almost ground level six times a year. There are still hundreds of seedlings in the grassy areas though.

And of course there was a wisteria. I am still spraying that one. I may kill it yet, hopefully.
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Old 09-10-2018, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
6,875 posts, read 2,097,261 times
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Mulberries are delicious fruit and they have a long season of ripeness. Many birds will also enjoy them and bless you with their visits. Every year, a flock of wild band-tailed pigeons would spend a couple of weeks at our large mulberry tree. Every day for a couple of weeks in the summer, we would give some researchers at our university a basket full of its leaves. They fed them to the silkworm larvae they raised for experiments. I wish I had some of the trees at my current home.
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Old 09-10-2018, 08:18 PM
 
169 posts, read 54,028 times
Reputation: 614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Mulberries are delicious fruit and they have a long season of ripeness. Many birds will also enjoy them and bless you with their visits. Every year, a flock of wild band-tailed pigeons would spend a couple of weeks at our large mulberry tree. Every day for a couple of weeks in the summer, we would give some researchers at our university a basket full of its leaves. They fed them to the silkworm larvae they raised for experiments. I wish I had some of the trees at my current home.
I too am a mulberry lover but in order for humans to love them and not wildly hate them them need to be kept at head height, I cut mine back 2X a year. It's the trees that people hate because of staining and messiness.

No seeds to get in your teeth like blackberries and easy to make jam. Mulberrries require no pesticides and not much attention other than cutting back.

Regarding invasive plants: I learned never to accept "gift" plants because they usually were junk that took over the yard. Still trying to get rid of one given by a neighbor (they moved away) that pops up all over the yard. Not as bad as kudzu but with similar plans to take over the world.
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Old 09-10-2018, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
6,875 posts, read 2,097,261 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Mulberries are delicious fruit and they have a long season of ripeness. Many birds will also enjoy them and bless you with their visits. Every year, a flock of wild band-tailed pigeons would spend a couple of weeks at our large mulberry tree. Every day for a couple of weeks in the summer, we would give some researchers at our university a basket full of its leaves. They fed them to the silkworm larvae they raised for experiments. I wish I had some of the trees at my current home.
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkletwinkle22 View Post
I too am a mulberry lover but in order for humans to love them and not wildly hate them them need to be kept at head height, I cut mine back 2X a year. It's the trees that people hate because of staining and messiness.

No seeds to get in your teeth like blackberries and easy to make jam. Mulberrries require no pesticides and not much attention other than cutting back.

Regarding invasive plants: I learned never to accept "gift" plants because they usually were junk that took over the yard. Still trying to get rid of one given by a neighbor (they moved away) that pops up all over the yard. Not as bad as kudzu but with similar plans to take over the world.
We lived on a farm and our giant mulberry tree was about 120 feet from our house, so there was no problem with messiness.
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Old 09-11-2018, 07:52 AM
 
Location: New Mexico U.S.A.
23,926 posts, read 38,388,662 times
Reputation: 27900
Quote:
Originally Posted by WouldLoveTo View Post
The fence was installed by past owners in the mid-90s and is pretty much end of life. It's only 3 or so sections. I have no problem replacing it myself, but here's the problem: the bigger trunk is still pushing against the fence and the smaller one has a large root that's coming under onto my property.

I cannot talk to them simply because they do not answer their door even though I know they are home.

What are my options with the tree trunks and roots?

The first pic is just about their entire fence area, the second is the bigger tree that's pushing the fence apart and the third is the root of the second tree under the fence.
Check with your local city ordinance office.

Send owners a registered letter.

The city should be able to provide the name and address of the property owners.

Consider an attorney if need be.

You can apply root killer to eliminate the tree, if need be...
Home › Ornamental Gardens › Trees › General Tree Care
How To Kill A Tree: Killing Trees In Your Garden
General Tree Care
By: Heather Rhoades
https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/orn...our-garden.htm
I would have just constructed a better fence around the tree.
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Old Yesterday, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
2,563 posts, read 1,143,027 times
Reputation: 4817
Sigh....my neighbor wouldn't let my gardeners trim the trees that are overhanging onto his property. So I have a bunch of half trimmed trees. Says he'll only let me onto his property...I told him to enjoy the shade.
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