U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-30-2018, 08:22 PM
 
822 posts, read 321,505 times
Reputation: 794

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
sasie - I've had good results with Garden Safe Neem Oil Extract (from Big Orange). I use their Insecticidal Soap for some insects (sucking insects are the biggest problem in my area. Plus, it says safe for organic gardening (however I don't really care as I use them on ornamentals).

Reactionary: Is Big Orange a garden center? I found Big Orange Arts and Crafts, but nothing about gardening.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-30-2018, 08:35 PM
 
4,743 posts, read 8,423,963 times
Reputation: 4009
Sasie - sorry. Big Orange is Home Depot, as opposed to Big Blue, which is Lowe's.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2018, 04:21 AM
 
Location: NJ
9,070 posts, read 20,155,834 times
Reputation: 6084
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
I have tried the oil, with baking soda.... and other organic ones that I cannot remember right now, but I will try everything that is recommended. I have had it in the past, never went away, but I have noticed that in previous years, when I sprayed a lot, the next year it did not come back as much. In those occasions, I tried Maneb and Captan, from Jung Seed. This year, I did not used these because I wanted to see, if the organics will work.....nothing.....nada....zilch....

PHLOX PANICULATA, is one of my favorite flowers, the other one is Dahlias.......I will continue to grow Phlox.
Nothing can beat these, for beauty, fragance, and the length of time they flower.......even with the P/M on them.

Now P/P are coming in, shorter, and with less tendency for P/W......love them..... they are gaining lots of attention, from corporations. Maybe a cure is in the making. Thank you, everyone, greatly appreciated....
I have a friend Rosesense who gardens where you are; I can ask her if you need me to.

I grow a lot of Phlox, variegated, hot pink, red, orange. I remember one variety that used to suffer but I don't think I have it any more. Thankfully I haven't had an issue. I would cut them down if they're that bad which will open up air space in your garden.

What else are you growing? Do you have roses or is it just Phlox with the PM? With climate change you may have to adjust the plants in your garden to plants that are not as likely to get it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
I used Serenade, and Daconil.........zilch....However, Daconil has a concentrated one, and is more expensive, but I purchased the regular one......Serenade was a joke.....
Daconil is one of the best fungicides you can buy.

Here is what google suggests
How do I get rid of powdery mildew?
Mix 1 tablespoon of baking soda in a gallon of water and add teaspoon of liquid soap. Surprisingly, studies have shown that milk is effective in slowing the spread of powdery mildew on plants that are already infected. Mix 1 part milk to 9 parts water and spray on plants showing signs of powdery mildew


Will powdery mildew kill my plants?
There are many different species of the fungal disease powdery mildew, and each species attacks a range of different plants. ... Powdery mildew can slow down the growth of your plant. In some cases, if the infection is severe enough, powdery mildew can kill your plants.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-01-2018, 08:43 PM
 
822 posts, read 321,505 times
Reputation: 794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
I have a friend Rosesense who gardens where you are; I can ask her if you need me to.

I grow a lot of Phlox, variegated, hot pink, red, orange. I remember one variety that used to suffer but I don't think I have it any more. Thankfully I haven't had an issue. I would cut them down if they're that bad which will open up air space in your garden.

What else are you growing? Do you have roses or is it just Phlox with the PM? With climate change you may have to adjust the plants in your garden to plants that are not as likely to get it.



Daconil is one of the best fungicides you can buy.

Here is what google suggests
How do I get rid of powdery mildew?
Mix 1 tablespoon of baking soda in a gallon of water and add teaspoon of liquid soap. Surprisingly, studies have shown that milk is effective in slowing the spread of powdery mildew on plants that are already infected. Mix 1 part milk to 9 parts water and spray on plants showing signs of powdery mildew


Will powdery mildew kill my plants?
There are many different species of the fungal disease powdery mildew, and each species attacks a range of different plants. ... Powdery mildew can slow down the growth of your plant. In some cases, if the infection is severe enough, powdery mildew can kill your plants.
What part of NJ are you in? North, South, East, West? I am in Southern NYC, probably not far from you. Do you use powder milk, or regular milk? Is Rosesense near me? Please, ask her anyway. My ears are open to everything. Thanks a million.....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-04-2018, 04:08 AM
 
Location: NJ
9,070 posts, read 20,155,834 times
Reputation: 6084
Quote:
Originally Posted by sasie123 View Post
What part of NJ are you in? North, South, East, West? I am in Southern NYC, probably not far from you. Do you use powder milk, or regular milk? Is Rosesense near me? Please, ask her anyway. My ears are open to everything. Thanks a million.....
Sorry I must have been half asleep when I replied. I thought you were in Pacific North West for some reason but see now that you're not. No clue where I got that from unless I mixed you up with someone else commenting.

I'm down in South Jersey now, used to be from North Jersey, near Elizabeth/ Cranford; worked in Watchung then lived in Edison too before coming South.

I got that from google. I must have been having an off morning because I normally give the link. I assume they mean real milk.

Honestly I would start cutting perennials affected down. My hub cut down everything except my roses and a few flowering plants 2 weeks ago. I could have killed him because we're gonna be moving, I've been digging plants to give a neighbor; have a few other friends that want plants. I have some Japanese painted ferns I needed to dig out but he weed whacked those. Thankfully they're coming back up from all the rain we've had.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-07-2018, 09:44 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,632 posts, read 20,358,310 times
Reputation: 30559
For ornamentals that don't respond to organic solutions, I use the non-organic options. I had a slight beginning of powdery mildew show up on my balcony plants last spring, and when the organic solutions did'n't work, I used the heavy stuff. As I recall it was a Bayer product. Used it on my dwarf crepe myrtle and a couple of other ornamentals (not edible plants) and it got rid of it right away.

Powdery mildew can show up in your garden regardless of how great you take care of your plants or how hardy they are, etc., as it can just blow in the wind from your neighbor's yards. So, there isn't really any preventive measure you can take that would be 100%. It's more a matter of nipping it in the bud when it shows up. I just haven't found the organic options to work, and I have ended up spending a lot of money on them - and then just end up buying the effective non-organic stuff, too. So, now, I just go straight for the non-organic stuff. Why waste the money?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2018, 08:35 PM
 
822 posts, read 321,505 times
Reputation: 794
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
Sorry I must have been half asleep when I replied. I thought you were in Pacific North West for some reason but see now that you're not. No clue where I got that from unless I mixed you up with someone else commenting.

I'm down in South Jersey now, used to be from North Jersey, near Elizabeth/ Cranford; worked in Watchung then lived in Edison too before coming South.

I got that from google. I must have been having an off morning because I normally give the link. I assume they mean real milk.

Honestly I would start cutting perennials affected down. My hub cut down everything except my roses and a few flowering plants 2 weeks ago. I could have killed him because we're gonna be moving, I've been digging plants to give a neighbor; have a few other friends that want plants. I have some Japanese painted ferns I needed to dig out but he weed whacked those. Thankfully they're coming back up from all the rain we've had.
Roselvr: Thank you so very much for your help......I tried to give you points, but I had before, and they would not let me.......greatly appreciated.....have a wonderful day....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-08-2018, 08:38 PM
 
822 posts, read 321,505 times
Reputation: 794
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
For ornamentals that don't respond to organic solutions, I use the non-organic options. I had a slight beginning of powdery mildew show up on my balcony plants last spring, and when the organic solutions did'n't work, I used the heavy stuff. As I recall it was a Bayer product. Used it on my dwarf crepe myrtle and a couple of other ornamentals (not edible plants) and it got rid of it right away.

Powdery mildew can show up in your garden regardless of how great you take care of your plants or how hardy they are, etc., as it can just blow in the wind from your neighbor's yards. So, there isn't really any preventive measure you can take that would be 100%. It's more a matter of nipping it in the bud when it shows up. I just haven't found the organic options to work, and I have ended up spending a lot of money on them - and then just end up buying the effective non-organic stuff, too. So, now, I just go straight for the non-organic stuff. Why waste the money?
NoMoreSnowForMe: Thank you for all your help. I am obliged to try some of the non-organic products, since they are not working fore me. Let's see what happens. Unable to rep you, since I had rep you before.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2018, 06:36 PM
 
78 posts, read 40,211 times
Reputation: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I have a sink or swim garden. I use some fungicides and insecticides but for the most part, my plants need to acclimate or buh bye.
+1. I cut down most of my peonies in September, because I was already tired of looking at the powdery mildew. I'm sure they'll be back next spring. If not, well, I'll put something easier care in its spot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-12-2018, 11:28 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,337 posts, read 50,426,523 times
Reputation: 28503
When you treat powdery mildew with anything and it rains, the treatment washes off before doing it's job. I have used baking soda on the cucumbers in my greenhouse and it worked well, but was protected from the rain. Since that year I switched from soaker hose that sprayed onto the leaves to drip system, so no more PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top