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Old 10-03-2018, 05:38 AM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
29,920 posts, read 34,517,946 times
Reputation: 35917

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellise View Post
After seeing how the oak trees in my neighborhood fared during Florence, I don't want oaks anywhere near my house. The biggest limbs in my yard were from oaks (blown in from a neighboring yard). One house down the road had two huge oak trees fallen down (not on their house fortunately).

My pear trees only lost one limb between the two of them. And the pines seemed to hold up better than the oaks.
I used oaks just as an example since I didn't know your area well. Use whatever is long living and native to your area. I'd talk to a good nursery man and find trees that would be best.

BP's were planted a lot in the 90's. They split in high winds after they get 8-10 years old. After we have winds here for many years our streets would be littered with blown down BP limbs.

They're just not a good long term investment.
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Old 10-03-2018, 08:35 AM
 
783 posts, read 679,951 times
Reputation: 1888
Bradford pears have gone from darling to despised recently:

https://mdc.mo.gov/newsroom/mdc-enco...ord-pear-trees
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Old 10-03-2018, 08:41 AM
 
37 posts, read 75,070 times
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Our subdivision was built out from 1994-96 and every house had 2-3 Bradford Pears planted out front as street trees. Apparently whomever was in charge didn't do their homework on Bradford Pears or not much was known about them at the time. Fast-forward 20-25 years and there are maybe 5-10% of these trees left. The unfortunate part is that most homeowners that took out their damaged Bradford Pears over the years, haven't bothered to replace them with new trees...probably because the Bradford Pears were such a mess to deal with. So no nice tree lined streets here as I'd like to see.

So yes, BPs may seem like nice trees for about 10 years, but then they are junk. They grow fast and have no structure stability. Between years 15-20 they will likely split off in huge sections leaving a mess to clean up and hopefully not on top of a car in the driveway. While they might have a nice blooms in the Spring, even the blooms smell bad. And for good measure, Bradford Pears are invasive trees that will take over vacant lots and other areas, out-competing native trees. Our state legislature actually passed a bill earlier this year, making it illegal to sell 38 invasive plants/tree. Included on that list is the Bradford Pear.

When in doubt (or just always), plant native trees.
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Old 10-03-2018, 09:08 AM
 
4,743 posts, read 8,435,394 times
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My pet gardening cause is invasive species. I was surprised to learn that NC doesn't include Bradford Pears on their invasive species list (however their list appears to be quite old). My advice would be to nuke the Bradford Pears from orbit, then plant native trees as wellmabt suggests.
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Old 10-03-2018, 09:13 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
34,530 posts, read 42,694,765 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by semispherical View Post
Bradford pears have gone from darling to despised recently:

https://mdc.mo.gov/newsroom/mdc-enco...ord-pear-trees
We certainly despised our two, until we had them taken down. Every big wind caused one of the huge heavy branches to fall and take out a section of our, and the neighbor’s, fence. They are not recommended, unless they are planted somewhere that falling branches won’t be cause for concern.

The wood is so dense and heavy that it is even difficult to get a homeowner size chain saw through it.
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Old 10-04-2018, 03:16 AM
 
6 posts, read 940 times
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oak is a quite invasive tree, it looks very good in old age - by planting it you do it for future generations
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Old 10-04-2018, 06:11 AM
 
Location: Southeastern North Carolina
1,607 posts, read 3,111,509 times
Reputation: 2802
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
My pet gardening cause is invasive species. I was surprised to learn that NC doesn't include Bradford Pears on their invasive species list (however their list appears to be quite old). My advice would be to nuke the Bradford Pears from orbit, then plant native trees as wellmabt suggests.
I'm not going to "nuke" two healthy trees, even though they are non native, invasive weed trees with stinky blossoms. They're at least 20 years old, and they just stood up to 100 mph winds with minimal damage. And there are lots of them in the area that fared well in the storm, too.

Only on the CD forum can a simple question about out of season blooms turn into a tree-hate thread.
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Old 10-04-2018, 08:19 AM
 
1,480 posts, read 792,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellise View Post
I'm not going to "nuke" two healthy trees, even though they are non native, invasive weed trees with stinky blossoms. They're at least 20 years old, and they just stood up to 100 mph winds with minimal damage. And there are lots of them in the area that fared well in the storm, too.

Only on the CD forum can a simple question about out of season blooms turn into a tree-hate thread.

think you're right in this. as in so many other things," if it ain't broke don't fix it". IF your tree is doing well for you, is healthy and happy (and not in some way a serious potential hazard to you or your neighbors) and gives you either good service for shade or shelter or simply joy in it's beauty or toughness in the face of adversity then keep it. like the "tree that grew in Brooklyn" sometimes even what others regard as a "weed" can be a blessing in it's own way worthy of love and care.


enjoy your trees.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 10-04-2018 at 08:36 AM..
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Old 10-04-2018, 08:30 AM
 
Location: By the sea, by the sea, by the beautiful sea
54,144 posts, read 38,214,111 times
Reputation: 26625
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellise View Post
They usually bloom in March. This morning I noticed that they're blooming, maybe about 1/4th of the amount of spring flowering.

Could this be something to do with Hurricane Florence? My house was right in the path of the storm.

i'm at the south end of NHC and have the same situation. When I got back to my house after Florence had passed I noticed my Bradford Pears had lost a lot of leaves, probably a good thing as it gives the wind less to grab onto. A week later they must think it's Spring as they're in bloom.
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Old 10-04-2018, 09:18 AM
 
4,743 posts, read 8,435,394 times
Reputation: 4009
Ellise - Bradford Pears are terrible trees and are a scourge in the South. Your gardening ideas are selfish and short-sighted. As a certified urban forester, I am by no means a "tree-hater".

george... well, bless your heart. BTW the "tree that grew in Brooklyn" (or tree of heaven) is not worthy of love and care in the US. It is not a "blessing". In addition to its own issues, it harbors invasive insects like the spotted lanternfly (see this thread):

Coming Soon: Spotted Lanternflies
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