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Old 10-04-2018, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Floribama
13,437 posts, read 29,361,107 times
Reputation: 11774

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellise View Post
After seeing how the oak trees in my neighborhood fared during Florence, I don't want oaks anywhere near my house. The biggest limbs in my yard were from oaks (blown in from a neighboring yard). One house down the road had two huge oak trees fallen down (not on their house fortunately).

My pear trees only lost one limb between the two of them. And the pines seemed to hold up better than the oaks.
There are so many types of oaks, and they vary a lot. What you saw were most likely Water Oak, which are very weak, they canít compare to other oaks like Live Oak or White Oak.
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Old 10-04-2018, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Southeastern North Carolina
1,605 posts, read 3,105,882 times
Reputation: 2801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
Ellise - Bradford Pears are terrible trees and are a scourge in the South. Your gardening ideas are selfish and short-sighted. As a certified urban forester, I am by no means a "tree-hater".
Oh for heaven's sake, get over yourself. I didn't plant the trees, but I'm not going to run out and chop them down because some stranger on the internet disapproves of them.
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Old 10-04-2018, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Southeastern North Carolina
1,605 posts, read 3,105,882 times
Reputation: 2801
Quote:
Originally Posted by burdell View Post
i'm at the south end of NHC and have the same situation. When I got back to my house after Florence had passed I noticed my Bradford Pears had lost a lot of leaves, probably a good thing as it gives the wind less to grab onto. A week later they must think it's Spring as they're in bloom.
The calendar says fall, the temperature is summery, and the landscape is blossoming like spring.....
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Old 10-04-2018, 11:48 AM
 
1,480 posts, read 789,195 times
Reputation: 568
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
Ellise - Bradford Pears are terrible trees and are a scourge in the South. Your gardening ideas are selfish and short-sighted. As a certified urban forester, I am by no means a "tree-hater".

george... well, bless your heart (and thanks for the link as well). BTW the "tree that grew in Brooklyn" (or tree of heaven) is not worthy of love and care in the US. It is not a "blessing". In addition to its own issues, it harbors invasive insects like the spotted lanternfly (see this thread):

Coming Soon: Spotted Lanternflies

and bless your heart right back (thanks for the link as well), LOL that said (and under absolutely no illusions about the potential and actuality of invasiveness under certain conditions---I was trained as a forester and horticulturalist and ran a State Park/public garden for over 20 years) under the particular urban situation I am speaking of in western Oregon the trees are healthy, happy, big, and old---and from an aesthetic POV (beauty), utility (good shade), sanitary viewpoint (very healthy), and historical (they are probably pushing 80 years old) they have "earned" their space IN THIS PARTICULAR SITUATION. FWIW, Miocene fossils of this genus have been recovered in our area so they were here a long time before we came so have some claim to being (returned) "natives" here.



just like every other living thing (including people) every kind of tree has both virtues and vices and should be carefully evaluated when planning and planting for it's suitability under various climatic and environmental situations. the tree that has many vices in one place and climate may NOT have those problems in a different area with a different climate. have heard folks back east castigate the tree of heaven and for that matter the water oak for being liable breakage by wind and ice storms and here in the west have rarely seen those problems at all. go figure.


peace to you and your plants.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 10-04-2018 at 12:42 PM..
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Old Today, 04:18 AM
 
6 posts, read 824 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ellise View Post
They usually bloom in March. This morning I noticed that they're blooming, maybe about 1/4th of the amount of spring flowering.

Could this be something to do with Hurricane Florence? My house was right in the path of the storm.
I think that Florence event has great impact on environment - whole year can be atypical...
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