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Old 10-09-2018, 08:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
I have no idea but I would do anything to have ST Augustine grass. we never had any grass that was as easy to take care of and keep looking pretty from mid spring until early winter or certainly late fall. It is just to cool here in NWA so we had our entire front yard turned into a rock yard last week. Now we have to decide on a couple of year round plants that we can put with the rocks to make it look a little less blaw!!! We did have the rock guys leave a couple of small ares rockless. Now, is rockless a word, I don't know?
I'm not a fan of st. Augustine. It's probably good in FL where it rains most says in the summer, but it can take a lot of irrigation in TX. I'd much rather have Bermuda as it seems to withstand drought much better.

I also hate it because it's not a nice grass to wall on. It's pretty scratchy compared to other grasses, particularly those found up north.
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Old 10-09-2018, 08:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I was wondering the same thing, but I don't think that is from dogs doing their business on it. It's too widespread and even, not patchy. When the picture is magnified I can see obvious black spots on all the dead vegetation and on the soil and on the edges of the concrete.

I think it is some kind of spreading fungal infection in the soil.

.
I'm thinking fungal also. But I treat it and it never grows all that well.

Its located on a long narrow strip between the road and sidewalk. I wonder if there is a soil issue because this strip is right over the storm sewer culvert. I'm wondering if perhaps the soil is very thin there.

My neighbors don't seem to have similar problems on their strips. But they aren't over a storm culvert either. Most likely there are several issues. I did a soil test and the ph was really high but the nitrogen, phosphorous and potash all seemed low.
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:12 PM
 
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What did the soil testers recommend for the high pH?
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Old 10-09-2018, 09:48 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
6,926 posts, read 12,344,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reactionary View Post
I suggest a soil test. They're inexpensive and will display lots of information about your soil, usually with recommendations for remediation.
That's what I was going to suggest. Here in Ky it's through the soil conservation service in each county. They give you a carton to put your 3 soil samples in and send it off.
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Old 10-09-2018, 10:09 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
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I think I'd just rip it out. Do you care about being able to walk on it?

I'm in zone 8b here in San Jose, CA, and a lot of people here have taken out a lot of their grass and planted other types of plants that don't need as much water. One that I really like, is a ground cover called aptenia, or baby sun rose. It's a succulent with tiny red or hot pink flowers. It's super hardy and from a distance, can just look like it's grass. It's a nice green. Houston is 8b and 9a from my search. So, it should do well there, too.

It will get ugly in winter, but comes back great in the spring.

It wouldn't be good for walking on, though. But, if you just need something that looks nice and doesn't use much water, it's a really nice ground cover.

Here are some photos:

https://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/243786/#b

Here, it grows well in full sun to shade. The more sun it has, the more it blooms. I snipped a few cuttings from a business nearby that uses it to cover a large area like a lawn, and mine is in a container on my balcony. Very pretty plant, very hardy, doesn't need much in the way of water or fertilizer.

You'd have to trim it once in a while, but it wouldn't take over - it's not invasive at all and is shallow-rooted.

FWIW.
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Old 10-10-2018, 12:37 AM
 
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Another reason for the name of that strip where we used to live is because of the confusing sort of ownership of that area. Wondering if that comes into play regarding fixing your problem .

With ours, we owned to the edge of our grass/fences. However, the sidewalk ...sometimes the city made one pay for damage that the city would then repair. But the homeowner was definitely responsible for shoveling snow from that sidewalk a certain number of hours after the snowfall stopped.

The city didn't water, fertilize, bug spray the grass strip nor the trees they planted in that strip. So one could think it was up to the homeowner. However, if there were a problem within that strip, it had to be reported to the city and the city might eventually cut down a tree that had died.

When our city didn't really take care of that strip, some nice new neighbors thought they'd just have the dead trees taken out and plant some nice pushes in there and they,the new neighbors, would take care of the strip. The city didn't like that but they eventually came to some kind of agreement.
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Old 10-10-2018, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by War Beagle View Post
I'm not a fan of st. Augustine. It's probably good in FL where it rains most says in the summer, but it can take a lot of irrigation in TX. I'd much rather have Bermuda as it seems to withstand drought much better.

I also hate it because it's not a nice grass to wall on. It's pretty scratchy compared to other grasses, particularly those found up north.
Interesting: the two times we had it were in the Dallas area and in So Cal. We loved it both times.Yes, it took some watering but not that much and it was so green and lush. Neither time did we have a sprinkler system but we did have to water it every few days. we just attached the sprinkler to the hose and turned it on, moving it every 15 minutes or so I guess to each his own.
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I think I'd just rip it out. Do you care about being able to walk on it?
I'd love to RIP it out and do rocks or other plants. But the HOA wont allow it so I'm stuck with suicidal grass.

I love the xeroscaping in the desert and other arid communities. Low maintenance and it looks more natural. Even with how expensive it is, I'd prefer to put in the artificial turf and ground up tires they use on sports fields. Again, not an option because of the HoA.
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Old 10-10-2018, 09:21 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
16,576 posts, read 20,318,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by War Beagle View Post
I'd love to RIP it out and do rocks or other plants. But the HOA wont allow it so I'm stuck with suicidal grass.

I love the xeroscaping in the desert and other arid communities. Low maintenance and it looks more natural. Even with how expensive it is, I'd prefer to put in the artificial turf and ground up tires they use on sports fields. Again, not an option because of the HoA.
So, what, exactly are the HOA rules? you must have what kind of grass? you must make sure it stays green? It must be of a certain species?

What are the exact specifications?
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Old 10-11-2018, 03:31 PM
 
8,121 posts, read 5,672,996 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
So, what, exactly are the HOA rules? you must have what kind of grass? you must make sure it stays green? It must be of a certain species?

What are the exact specifications?
Everyone gets the same type of grass. I'm not sure if they would throw a fit if I replaced st. Augustine with something different like Bermuda. They will 100% send a nastygram if there is a bare spot though so there is no way I could do the rock thing they so in the arid west. If it's just discoloration you might or might not here from them. They also appear to only allow trees and shrubs in certain places on the lot, meaning I couldn't fudge the grass with other plants.
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