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Old 11-04-2018, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Forest bathing
1,185 posts, read 691,091 times
Reputation: 2701

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I have found asparagus easy to grow. Just ask at your local Cooperative Extension Agency or Master Gardeners if you have one.

Freshness is important, too, in addition to cost. Thete is nothing from your garden like a crisp juicy carrot.

I would grow the following:
Tomatoes, especially the expensive heirlooms
Potatoes for baby potatoes and the fingerlings
Peas for freshness
Beans for freshness
Any fruit but would recommend blueberries as raspberries send out runners and strawberries need to be dug up and started anew after 4-5 years.
Carrots for fresh taste
Cucumbers for freshness
That should give you a start.

Make sure that you talk to locals to see what they grow and what does best in your area.
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Old 11-04-2018, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Forest bathing
1,185 posts, read 691,091 times
Reputation: 2701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Yes, asparagus requires no real work, but here I have to grow them in a greenhouse (unheated) and they do take up space, but worth it. I tried artichokes and they are always small the first year or two, but in our climate they didn’t survive the winter for a third year. They cost as much as $5/each here.
Really, in a greenhouse? I live north of you and grow mine outside in raised beds. I would grow artichoke starts in the greenhouse. That is what i did this year and even with a late start, they thrived.
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Old 11-05-2018, 01:39 AM
 
5,501 posts, read 8,196,957 times
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Any herbs.

for taste: tomatoes (I don't eat store bought, mine are great!)

And call me crazy but a salad made from lettuce and spinach that is so fresh I walked outside with a bowl and scissors to get it is just BETTER over the brown crap in stores.
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Old 11-05-2018, 02:24 AM
 
Location: Lake Oswego, Manhattan, Aspen
3,141 posts, read 3,972,855 times
Reputation: 11078
Quote:
Originally Posted by HB2HSV View Post
Thanks for the great ideas guys!

I eat a lot of broccoli so that’s a winner. I’ll probably need to use a cold frame to get a head start. Back in Alabama the weather heats up quickly and my broccoli bolted prematurely.

You guys are right on, plant what we like to eat. We also like cilantro so that’s a contender. I am intrigued with Argula so maybe we’ll try that. I do want to plant garlic just to test out the bed. The wife likes to use shallots for cooking so we’ll plant that too.

I agreed about asparagus. It sounds like a lot of work from what i’ve read.
When I was little, the "rich" families (for whom I pulled weeds) divided their clumps of asparagus, and shared them with other "rich" families. That was in Mississippi, and all it took was a shovel. Once established, the asparagus was problem-free (and the feathery foliage was a mainstay for Garden Club ladies' floral arrangements).

As a young bride, I planted asparagus SEEDS, and was passably successful in growing it (we moved too often for clumps to become established). I've wondered whether the passalong variety was better suited to the locale, than the "store-bought" cultivars.

Anyway, here's my "expensive" list, for Alabama.

Okra (just because it's so easy, in your climate - and, of course, the most delicious thing on Earth).

Heirloom Tomatoes (have you priced THOSE?)

Perennial Onions

Lemongrass (Every gourmet cook in 'Fashionable Northeast Jackson' https://goo.gl/images/HJ5jff kept a pot of Lemongrass near the kitchen door. It's way more pungent when plucked fresh, than from the grocery.)

Oregano (dried, it's disgusting. Fresh, it's a delight)

Garlic (I use garlic GREENS, more than the actual bulb - and those are generally only available to those who garden).

Swiss Chard (You harvest just the outer leaves of a clump, and leave the centers. They'll 'make' all season, that way).

Asparagus

Dill (two bucks for a few tiny sprigs, in the grocery stores)

Ginger (yes, it grows in the South, and USA-grown is hard, now, to find in the groceries)

Turmeric (they're growing it in Co-op gardens in Mississippi, so you can grow it, too: adds a rich, expensive flavor, and the health benefits are enormous)

Amaranth (the phytonutrient-rich greens are WONDERFUL in a gumbo - better than shrimp, IMHO)

Blueberries (not a veg. But a couple of bushes are nice to have, and will save you a fortune)

Purple Potatoes (Either Purple Sweet Potatoes, or Purple regular potatoes: pricey to buy, and the pigment confers enormous health benefits)

Peaches (not a veg., again. The best kinds, in my opinion, come from the pits you plant, yourself - maybe because they're not grafted, and maybe because, having never been transplanted, they have taproots. With seed-grown, flavor's a crapshoot - but I've generally beaten the odds, and had great peaches).

Last edited by GrandviewGloria; 11-05-2018 at 03:14 AM..
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Old 11-05-2018, 04:41 AM
 
599 posts, read 359,338 times
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I have found for me only thing worth growing here in NJ is Tomatoes, I have my own supply of good tomatoes from early July to end of October. I found the "heirloom" type do not produce many tomatoes so I stopped growing them and just stick with large beefsteak style plants.
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Old 11-05-2018, 06:26 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
28,515 posts, read 50,877,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xPlorer48 View Post
Really, in a greenhouse? I live north of you and grow mine outside in raised beds. I would grow artichoke starts in the greenhouse. That is what i did this year and even with a late start, they thrived.
I cannot grow anything outside of the greenhouse, because of the deer, rabbits, raccoons, squirrels and crows.
That’s based on experience, it’s very frustrating to find all of your crops eaten or pulled up. They were not interested in the artichokes, but they are perennial and sensitive to hard freeze, and take up too much space in the greenhouse.
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Old 11-05-2018, 07:11 AM
 
11,788 posts, read 16,531,342 times
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We had bumper crops of Armenian Cucumber and yard long beans in pots and raised beds two years in a row. Parsley Celery makes perfect straws for Bloody Mary if you let it go long enough.
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Old 11-05-2018, 09:21 AM
 
9,633 posts, read 4,813,926 times
Reputation: 6345
I give up growing carrots, I used to grow lots of them. But we eat like 6lbs every week, I won’t be able to keep up. But I now grow beet roots instead. I have green beans because they are much fresher than store bought.
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Old 11-05-2018, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Forest bathing
1,185 posts, read 691,091 times
Reputation: 2701
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I cannot grow anything outside of the greenhouse, because of the deer, rabbits, raccoons, squirrels and crows.
That’s based on experience, it’s very frustrating to find all of your crops eaten or pulled up. They were not interested in the artichokes, but they are perennial and sensitive to hard freeze, and take up too much space in the greenhouse.
Aha, understood. We live on acreage but have 2 dogs so the deer stay away unless they get too tempted by apples on the ground.

Artichoke starts aren’t too costly so you could either protect them with a mulch/repay or cultivate as an annual crop. They are ornamental as well.
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Old 11-05-2018, 12:42 PM
 
4,773 posts, read 8,406,928 times
Reputation: 3450
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrandviewGloria View Post
When I was little, the "rich" families (for whom I pulled weeds) divided their clumps of asparagus, and shared them with other "rich" families. That was in Mississippi, and all it took was a shovel. Once established, the asparagus was problem-free (and the feathery foliage was a mainstay for Garden Club ladies' floral arrangements).

As a young bride, I planted asparagus SEEDS, and was passably successful in growing it (we moved too often for clumps to become established). I've wondered whether the passalong variety was better suited to the locale, than the "store-bought" cultivars.

Anyway, here's my "expensive" list, for Alabama.

Okra (just because it's so easy, in your climate - and, of course, the most delicious thing on Earth).

Heirloom Tomatoes (have you priced THOSE?)

Perennial Onions

Lemongrass (Every gourmet cook in 'Fashionable Northeast Jackson' https://goo.gl/images/HJ5jff kept a pot of Lemongrass near the kitchen door. It's way more pungent when plucked fresh, than from the grocery.)

Oregano (dried, it's disgusting. Fresh, it's a delight)

Garlic (I use garlic GREENS, more than the actual bulb - and those are generally only available to those who garden).

Swiss Chard (You harvest just the outer leaves of a clump, and leave the centers. They'll 'make' all season, that way).

Asparagus

Dill (two bucks for a few tiny sprigs, in the grocery stores)

Ginger (yes, it grows in the South, and USA-grown is hard, now, to find in the groceries)

Turmeric (they're growing it in Co-op gardens in Mississippi, so you can grow it, too: adds a rich, expensive flavor, and the health benefits are enormous)

Amaranth (the phytonutrient-rich greens are WONDERFUL in a gumbo - better than shrimp, IMHO)

Blueberries (not a veg. But a couple of bushes are nice to have, and will save you a fortune)

Purple Potatoes (Either Purple Sweet Potatoes, or Purple regular potatoes: pricey to buy, and the pigment confers enormous health benefits)

Peaches (not a veg., again. The best kinds, in my opinion, come from the pits you plant, yourself - maybe because they're not grafted, and maybe because, having never been transplanted, they have taproots. With seed-grown, flavor's a crapshoot - but I've generally beaten the odds, and had great peaches).
I LOVE YOUR LIST!!

Yup, wife uses lemongrass for cooking so that’s on the list. Dill, garlics, swiss chards, tumerics, and ginger are all contenders. LOVE the idea of fruit trees, already got a peach from previous home owner but do like blueberry and had them in my old house.

I placed straws all along the wall. That’s approximately 50’ X 70’ L-shape with a 6’ wide bed. My plan is to plant fruit trees every 15 ft or so but in between it makes a natural “raised bed”. It greatly increases the choices for planting.
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