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Old 11-30-2018, 05:37 PM
 
9,546 posts, read 7,473,271 times
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OP, some plants that aren't winter hardy for an area can still be grown as an annual.
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Old 11-30-2018, 05:41 PM
Status: "I hate cool and cold weather" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: 46060, Hardiness zone 5b/6a
2,250 posts, read 1,618,876 times
Reputation: 731
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Your complaint doesn't make sense to me. Are you suggesting that nursery owners should CONTROL their customers' purchases and only sell plants that are guaranteed to be reliable in the local outdoor climate in their location?


.
No, I am just trying to say that people should use common sense and like others have stated on this thread to make wise use of their resources rather than to spend like $200.00 on a plant only to lose it to the weather(unless of course people are gluttons for punishment and like to see their landscapes falter), which in that case if that is the way gardeners like to operate their landscaping, mission accomplished. People should be able to do what they want with their landscape, my prerogative isnít to say that garden centers should control how their customers make use of their land, but rather to be wise so as to avoid plant damage/death due to ignorance on what works/survives in a zone and what doesnít.



I suppose some people might be plant sadists and desire to and deliberately plant something that obviously would not have a chance of being successful in a given climate, and as such is probably why you wonít find palm trees growing in Indiana or citrus orchards being tended to in Tennessee.
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Old 11-30-2018, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
19,282 posts, read 12,748,394 times
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https://www.seedsnow.com/pages/grow-zone-map-new

I donít know, but here is the 2018 USDA plant hardiness map, which I imagine is different from the 2012 map. With the continuing warming of our climate, there will be some plants that survive where they could not have survived before.

I was shocked to find myself in plant zone 9. In 2012, I believe I was in zone 7.
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Old 11-30-2018, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Washington state
4,774 posts, read 2,369,427 times
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Living in the Pacific Northwest, I was wondering if it was possible to grow lemon trees and watermelons here by growing them against a wall. I thought in the case of trees, I might be able to make a glass shield on rollers to wheel over the tree during winter. Then I came across this article:

https://99percentinvisible.org/artic...icro-climates/

I had a lemon tree when I lived in the Bay Area and there were many occasions when it got below freezing and we even had snow once in a while. My tree was next to a tall wooden fence, semi-shaded by a Chinese Elm, and with pavement and a garage behind it, and I got two crops of lemons off of it every year. I mention the fence because my car was parked alongside this same fence and when there was frost on the car, it was never on the side of the car that was next to the fence.

Last edited by rodentraiser; 11-30-2018 at 06:15 PM..
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Old 11-30-2018, 06:14 PM
 
Location: Washington state
4,774 posts, read 2,369,427 times
Reputation: 14024
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
https://www.seedsnow.com/pages/grow-zone-map-new

I donít know, but here is the 2018 USDA plant hardiness map, which I imagine is different from the 2012 map. With the continuing warming of our climate, there will be some plants that survive where they could not have survived before.

I was shocked to find myself in plant zone 9. In 2012, I believe I was in zone 7.
I've always been told I'm in Zone 8 and yet this map says Zone 9 all along my area. Thing is, that Zone 9 and the previous Zone 8 maps make no exception for the micro climate I'm going to be living in (which also says Zone 9). I'll be 40 miles away and 500ft higher than I am now and will regularly get snow flurries much more often than where I currently live, and also get much more rain and wind. I would be willing to bet my microclimate is more like Zone 6 or 7. Sometimes those maps aren't always as accurate as they could be.
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Old 11-30-2018, 06:35 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,169 posts, read 5,907,379 times
Reputation: 10918
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
I've always been told I'm in Zone 8 and yet this map says Zone 9 all along my area. Thing is, that Zone 9 and the previous Zone 8 maps make no exception for the micro climate I'm going to be living in (which also says Zone 9). I'll be 40 miles away and 500ft higher than I am now and will regularly get snow flurries much more often than where I currently live, and also get much more rain and wind. I would be willing to bet my microclimate is more like Zone 6 or 7. Sometimes those maps aren't always as accurate as they could be.

Rodentraiser, try this site to find your own specific microclimate that you are going to be living in. I've found it to be quite accurate and up-to-date with the rapidly changing climate conditions that we're all going through here on the west coast: https://www.plantmaps.com/


.
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Old 11-30-2018, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
16,548 posts, read 7,295,575 times
Reputation: 9405
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
I've always been told I'm in Zone 8 and yet this map says Zone 9 all along my area. Thing is, that Zone 9 and the previous Zone 8 maps make no exception for the micro climate I'm going to be living in (which also says Zone 9). I'll be 40 miles away and 500ft higher than I am now and will regularly get snow flurries much more often than where I currently live, and also get much more rain and wind. I would be willing to bet my microclimate is more like Zone 6 or 7. Sometimes those maps aren't always as accurate as they could be.
The Sunset zone system is much more reliable, especially for western states. It accounts very well for microclimates. https://www.sunset.com/garden/climat...s-intro-us-map

Something I did when I was living in a confusing area - make a list of the three or four most common native trees in your immediate vicinity. Look them up in the Sunset system, and find out in which zone(s) they are most common. Be aware that this will only give you info on what your actual zone has been been, not for what it will be.
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Old 11-30-2018, 07:30 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,169 posts, read 5,907,379 times
Reputation: 10918
Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post


...... Then I came across this article:

https://99percentinvisible.org/artic...icro-climates/

That's an interesting article about fruit walls and walled gardens. Cool pictures. Thanks for posting that.


.
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Old Yesterday, 10:01 AM
 
5,884 posts, read 3,132,259 times
Reputation: 15444
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Your complaint doesn't make sense to me. Are you suggesting that nursery owners should CONTROL their customers' purchases and only sell plants that are guaranteed to be reliable in the local outdoor climate in their location?


.
No. But they should be professional about advising people what the risks are when picking that plant. Perhaps this being a gardening forum, folks are assuming everyone is knowledgeable about plants and hardiness zones. In reality most homeowners aren't. They go to the nursery, see some pretty plants and think "oh, those will look so good in the yard." Take them home, plant them, and they die. It's one thing to make a conscious decision to take a risk. I've intentionally done that myself. Sometimes it works; sometimes it doesn't. It's another altogether to be who is uninformed to be mislead into thinking something will grow. And putting a label that's incomprehensible to the average homeowner may meet the legal minimum, but a professional, ethical nursery will tell the customer of the risk they are taking.
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Old Yesterday, 10:37 AM
 
10,688 posts, read 4,238,045 times
Reputation: 15162
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
https://www.seedsnow.com/pages/grow-zone-map-new

I donít know, but here is the 2018 USDA plant hardiness map, which I imagine is different from the 2012 map. With the continuing warming of our climate, there will be some plants that survive where they could not have survived before.

I was shocked to find myself in plant zone 9. In 2012, I believe I was in zone 7.
My plant zone also changed from zone 8 to zone 9. Some people like to experiment with plants. Some people have green houses. Some people keep plants in pots and bring them in during coldest winter months. Some people buy perennials knowing they will be annuals in their climate and don't care. Other people just don't have a clue what they are buying because they do zero research. Everyone has a smart phone now. Just google the plant before you go to the register and see where it grows best. None of this is rocket science.
Some big box stores have a year warranty on their plants so if it dies for any reason even lack of water, you can bring it back.
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