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Old 12-02-2018, 05:06 AM
 
9,811 posts, read 7,630,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Because it gives people a variety and an opportunity to buy plants and flowers rather exotic to them and not commonly found. People like that. People want more than pansies, boxwood and junipers. Many gardeners enjoy a challenge and as previously mentioned, some people over winter some plants indoors or in green houses when they can including citrus, sweet smelling jasmine and other plants considered non hardy in many zones. No one is forcing anyone to buy these plants. Information is readily available on most plants found on tags giving planting zones or minimum temps these plants can survive and many people have their smart phones and just look them up before buying them.
Lowes is willing to take the loss if and when these non hardy plants are brought back because having a wider variety of plants available brings more people into their nurseries and stores. They aren't stupid. If it wasn't profitable they wouldn't do it.
Exactly. I welcome having a greater variety from which to choose.
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Old 12-02-2018, 08:22 AM
 
843 posts, read 518,784 times
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I owned a plant nursery for a few years and its an extremely tough job and marginally profitable business. People usually prefer Lowes and Home Depot. Lucky I kept my day job - (attorney). .



To answer specifically 1. People may want them. Some find the challenge of growing difficult plants fun. 2. They may make the place more attractive or exotic--its nice to have plants that other nurseries lack. 3. Some people create tropical or other environments in the home -greenhouse etc. 4. They may be experimenting.


Most nurseries have better and healthier plants than Home Depot. HD may put something in their plants to make them appear nice at the store. Its a better idea to support your local mom-pop nursery than ***** about them. Most do it because they love plants and like people.
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Old 12-02-2018, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,935 posts, read 7,539,011 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Your complaint doesn't make sense to me. Are you suggesting that nursery owners should CONTROL their customers' purchases and only sell plants that are guaranteed to be reliable in the local outdoor climate in their location?


.
Obviously it's a matter of degree - you probably WOULD fault the seller if you were in Chicago and they had palm trees in stock! Oh, right, the buyer shouldn't be an idiot - but there is the tacit knowledge you think an owner would have about the plants offered in a local store that makes you think...just maaaaybe it'll grow otherwise they wouldn't even have it to sell?

Something more borderline makes sense. Still, a reputable seller would hopefully comment to the buyer the degree of risk with a particular plant, otherwise they might end up getting a good number of returns. I wonder how many zones difference there would need to be to warrant a return?
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Old 12-02-2018, 09:02 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,363 posts, read 4,164,811 times
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We have the same problem here in SW Florida. Many of the nurseries (especially the big box stores) sell plants & flowers that do not do well in our hot Florida sun or can't take the heavy downpours we have in the summer and then drought in the winter. But I'm sure it's all about money. People who aren't aware of what grows well in their area are taken in by the "pretty" stuff and buy it only to watch it die a slow death.
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Old 12-02-2018, 10:16 AM
 
6,001 posts, read 3,212,171 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Are retail nursery staff expected to be horticulture advisers or just sales staff? Personally, just sell me the plant. I know how to Google.

What are these plant ethics?
Yes, as a matter of fact people who sell a product ARE expected to know the product. It's not a BigMac, but a product that can cost a decent amount of money and requires unique care to grow.


And "ethics" are very simple: Tell people the truth, give honest advice, and don't intentionally mislead someone into making a bad purchase just to make a sale. This really shouldn't be that difficult to understand.
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Old 12-02-2018, 11:40 AM
 
9,811 posts, read 7,630,937 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Yes, as a matter of fact people who sell a product ARE expected to know the product. It's not a BigMac, but a product that can cost a decent amount of money and requires unique care to grow.


And "ethics" are very simple: Tell people the truth, give honest advice, and don't intentionally mislead someone into making a bad purchase just to make a sale. This really shouldn't be that difficult to understand.
The minimum wage sales clerk in the WalMart garden section is going to know about plants?


How is it misleading if no questions are asked? It's one thing if someone asks a direct question and gets a false answer. It's another thing to expect a sales clerk to tackle you should you touch a non-winter hardy plant.


What about personal responsibility?
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Old 12-02-2018, 12:00 PM
 
1,466 posts, read 589,285 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
It looks like from the vibes I am getting on this post, that even the locally owned nurseries are all about business and profits and are gradually becoming like the corporate owned big box plant nurseries such as Home Depot, Loweís etc, correct me if Iím wrong, but they sell plants that arenít reliably hardy in a given zone just because people like taking risks?I guess the level of innate apathy has grown to an all time high. I suppose if I wanted to grow a tree like a southern magnolia or certain varieties of holly, I guess that I might consider it a gamble and learn through trial and error.......for a couple hundred dollars and a dead plant that fell victim to an unusually harsh winter after a doing fairly well or even thriving for a few years....
To put it in perspective. There is or was a restaurant in Plymouth MA that in the summer had palm trees (in pots) to give it a tropical feel. When the summer was over the palm trees were removed and I assumed to the nursery (local) who sold them to keep over the winter and then returned the next summer. Many of these plants you mentioned can be grown in large pots and then moved to a hot house or indoors. Even though they normally grow large if potted in the ground, in pots they remain smaller. Local nurseries cater to not only homeowners but to businesses as well who have different reasons for wanting varieties of plants not native to the area.
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Old 12-02-2018, 02:07 PM
 
27,411 posts, read 38,674,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron61 View Post
I canít imagine why any nursery would sell a plant that did not have a great chance of survival in their particular zone. Most nurseries guarantee their plants for one year, so they are going to eat the loss, not the customer.
As a customer one would think they would be certain to check the tag to confirm the zone hardiness. At least I always did that when I lived up north.
No loss. Most plants are priced at 3x the cost of the plant. If it is replaced they still make their profit. If it doesn't it covers one that does.
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Old 12-02-2018, 02:12 PM
 
10,839 posts, read 4,348,265 times
Reputation: 15498
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestGuest View Post
I owned a plant nursery for a few years and its an extremely tough job and marginally profitable business. People usually prefer Lowes and Home Depot. Lucky I kept my day job - (attorney). .



To answer specifically 1. People may want them. Some find the challenge of growing difficult plants fun. 2. They may make the place more attractive or exotic--its nice to have plants that other nurseries lack. 3. Some people create tropical or other environments in the home -greenhouse etc. 4. They may be experimenting.


Most nurseries have better and healthier plants than Home Depot. HD may put something in their plants to make them appear nice at the store. Its a better idea to support your local mom-pop nursery than ***** about them. Most do it because they love plants and like people.
No, the box stores don't put anything in their plants to keep them looking nice. The larger plants have dates on the label as to when they were shipped to them. After 30, 60 or 90 days, those plants are pulled and marked down. Some places like Depot have a "pay by scan" program where they don't even own those plants until they are sold. If they are not sold, they are disposed of.
Bedding plants are changed out on a regular basis and the turn around on these is fast enough that plants don't sit on the shelf and linger. If not sold, they are pulled and the wholesale nursery which sent them to the box store gives full credit on them. The box stores in other words don't pay for the plants that don't sell.
The contracts between wholesale nurseries and big box stores cover all of this. When you buy in the quantities the big box stores do, you have huge contracts worth tens of millions. People forget or don't realize the box store is actually the middle man between the large growers and the general public.
BTW, I'm all for buying first from the local nursery.

Last edited by marino760; 12-02-2018 at 02:27 PM..
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Old 12-02-2018, 02:30 PM
 
27,411 posts, read 38,674,555 times
Reputation: 35486
For those wanting to be adventurous I wish I could have you talk to my mother who passed in 1981.

She had a green arm. Living in central Iowa she grew plants from the Rocky Mountains, zone 6 and 7 and some of them were planted in an old cinder driveway.

When she first started working in local nurseries plant varieties were minimal. During this time we would all pile in the car and go driving in the country. She'd pick a spot and we'd all get out and start searching. Anytime we found an interesting plant she would either leave it (endangered) or take one.

She started encouraging growers to take them and propagate. One in particular really took to the idea. Smiths I believe it was (this was in the late 60's early 70's so my memory is a bit dim) and within a couple of years plants other than the "norm" were showing up in the nursery where she worked.

Other nurseries also started carrying these plants and the "boom" was on.

When we bought our first house we drove halfway across the state to Smiths and bought many flats of flowers for it. He gave us a growers discount and gave me some plants he was still testing and asked me to let him know how they fared. My favorite was a geranium we call Christmas because the leaves when crushed smelled like pine.

There are a lot of people who like to try iffy plants. I ended up as assistant manager at Earl May for a few years and there was a group of buyers that always looked for plants that were unique or didn't necessarily grow in our zone. We kept a list of their contact information and would call them when new plants came in.

I had a Japanese maple that wasn't supposed to grow in Iowa and planted it right behind the house on the south side. I wrapped it in burlap every winter. It thrived there. If I had planted it in a different environment I doubt it would have made it through the first winter.
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