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Old 12-02-2018, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Washington state
4,899 posts, read 2,448,691 times
Reputation: 14377

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Rodentraiser, try this site to find your own specific microclimate that you are going to be living in. I've found it to be quite accurate and up-to-date with the rapidly changing climate conditions that we're all going through here on the west coast: https://www.plantmaps.com.
Wow, that is helpful. It's interesting because the zone it includes is both coastal (some snow once in a while and not very much) up to my elevation, which can include snow 15" deep. It does say I would be in Zone B or Zone C. Good to know though. Thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
The Sunset zone system is much more reliable, especially for western states. It accounts very well for microclimates. https://www.sunset.com/garden/climat...s-intro-us-map

Something I did when I was living in a confusing area - make a list of the three or four most common native trees in your immediate vicinity. Look them up in the Sunset system, and find out in which zone(s) they are most common. Be aware that this will only give you info on what your actual zone has been been, not for what it will be.
Somewhere in the flatlands down by Eatonville is an awesome nursery that has a lot of PNW trees and plants. These people know what the weather is really like here and I may end up going there for a lot of my stuff. It doesn't hurt they used to have (and maybe still have) a taster's day when you can sample the various plums, peaches, apples, etc, and see what you like so you can plant the varieties you want.

But thank you, that Sunset zone system is very helpful, too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
That's an interesting article about fruit walls and walled gardens. Cool pictures. Thanks for posting that.

You're welcome!

Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
Hmm. Did you consult a WA State zone map? Those are usually more accurate.

OK, I can’t find a WA State 2018 planting zone map. I did locate one from 2012 though, and I am in zone 8b, according to it. I think I’ll stick with whatever specific to state info I can find until it changes.

I do agree that elevation influences this stuff.
Like you, I haven't found one yet, but I really like the one Zoisite posted. The big problem is, the area I'm in has so many little micro climates. I'll be living at the top of a hill which is on a peninsula which is located off another peninsula surrounded by ocean water and still I'll be only about a quarter mile from the coast (if I should decide to dive off a cliff, that is LOL). There are mountains on both sides of my county and it's open at the south end, which means that the weather has a straight shot in and it's always a crap shoot as to where any given storm is going to scatter once it comes up the pike, so to speak. Even the weather men can't get the correct forecast unless they stick their heads out their windows and look at what's happening. And 50 feet away or an hour further on, the weather may be completely different.
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Old 12-02-2018, 06:14 PM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,379 posts, read 6,036,968 times
Reputation: 11557
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post


For those wanting to be adventurous I wish I could have you talk to my mother who passed in 1981.....

Your mother sounds like a woman after my own heart.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post

....... The big problem is, the area I'm in has so many little micro climates. I'll be living at the top of a hill which is on a peninsula which is located off another peninsula surrounded by ocean water and still I'll be only about a quarter mile from the coast (if I should decide to dive off a cliff, that is LOL). There are mountains on both sides of my county and it's open at the south end, which means that the weather has a straight shot in and it's always a crap shoot as to where any given storm is going to scatter once it comes up the pike, so to speak. Even the weather men can't get the correct forecast unless they stick their heads out their windows and look at what's happening. And 50 feet away or an hour further on, the weather may be completely different.

When you move there you could try creating your own mini-microclimate just on your own property there with the types of plants/trees you select to grow on it.


.
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Old 12-02-2018, 06:50 PM
Status: "I am proud to shut down the government" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
16,814 posts, read 7,472,208 times
Reputation: 9599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Your mother sounds like a woman after my own heart.




When you move there you could try creating your own mini-microclimate just on your own property there with the types of plants/trees you select to grow on it.


.
Rodentraisser, I'm assuming you live in Pierce County, as I do.

Permaculturists experiment with sun spaces for marginally hardy plants. There's a famous photo of a lemon tree growing in the Alps. Granted, it didn't wasn't exactly bearing a bumper crop, but it was growing right out there in the open in the Alps. Can't find it right now, but here's the guy who was doing it - HOME

I met Sepp and his son a few years ago, a woman near Yelm had him come to the US and redesign her land. Sepp is not afraid of heavy machinery!

I still think most citrus will do better under cover in the PNW - it's not that some of them can't tolerate the cold, but the combo of drenching winter rains and minimal winter sun can really do them in.

I also know several people who are experimenting with growing olives commercially in the Willamette Valley and in the Seattle area. They will tell you that anyplace that can grow wine grapes can also grow olives. I remain a bit dubious, managing to grow a few plants for the challenge of it is not the same as growing commercially, but I am interested nevertheless!

Here are a couple of PNW nurseries who offer unusual fruits and are knowledgeable about permaculture methods -

https://onegreenworld.com

http://raintreenursery.com
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Old 12-03-2018, 06:33 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,400 posts, read 4,198,738 times
Reputation: 19554
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
No, the box stores don't put anything in their plants to keep them looking nice. The larger plants have dates on the label as to when they were shipped to them. After 30, 60 or 90 days, those plants are pulled and marked down. Some places like Depot have a "pay by scan" program where they don't even own those plants until they are sold. If they are not sold, they are disposed of.
Bedding plants are changed out on a regular basis and the turn around on these is fast enough that plants don't sit on the shelf and linger. If not sold, they are pulled and the wholesale nursery which sent them to the box store gives full credit on them. The box stores in other words don't pay for the plants that don't sell.
The contracts between wholesale nurseries and big box stores cover all of this. When you buy in the quantities the big box stores do, you have huge contracts worth tens of millions. People forget or don't realize the box store is actually the middle man between the large growers and the general public.
BTW, I'm all for buying first from the local nursery.
They definitely use a lot more pesticides than a nursery however. When I first started raising Monarch butterflies it was because of a lady at our local nursery who told me how they only eat milkweed so I bought one plant and before long I had Monarch caterpillars up the wazoo and no more leaves for them to eat.


Well Home Depot is closer to me so I bought a few more there, however after they emerged from the chrysalis and dried their wings, quite a few were deformed. It took me a while to figure out that the deformed ones were from Home Depot. Now I only buy milkweed from my nursery. I have seen about 50 Monarchs go from a tiny caterpillar to a beautiful jade green chrysalis to the perfect butterfly which I set free. It's a great feeling since they are endangered due to lack of the only plant that will lay eggs on and which the caterpillars feed on and that is milkweed. If anybody feels inclined to help them just dm me. It's really quite simple but be prepared to buy a lot of milkweed or grow your own as they can get eaten bare in a matter of a couple of days.
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Old 12-03-2018, 07:36 AM
 
10,926 posts, read 4,394,419 times
Reputation: 15641
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
They definitely use a lot more pesticides than a nursery however. When I first started raising Monarch butterflies it was because of a lady at our local nursery who told me how they only eat milkweed so I bought one plant and before long I had Monarch caterpillars up the wazoo and no more leaves for them to eat.


Well Home Depot is closer to me so I bought a few more there, however after they emerged from the chrysalis and dried their wings, quite a few were deformed. It took me a while to figure out that the deformed ones were from Home Depot. Now I only buy milkweed from my nursery. I have seen about 50 Monarchs go from a tiny caterpillar to a beautiful jade green chrysalis to the perfect butterfly which I set free. It's a great feeling since they are endangered due to lack of the only plant that will lay eggs on and which the caterpillars feed on and that is milkweed. If anybody feels inclined to help them just dm me. It's really quite simple but be prepared to buy a lot of milkweed or grow your own as they can get eaten bare in a matter of a couple of days.
The wholesale nurseries use pesticides when growing the plants, not the big box stores as a general rule.
The plants aren't usually there even long enough to warrant using pesticides.
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Old 12-03-2018, 09:20 AM
 
4,845 posts, read 1,699,690 times
Reputation: 11428
I know that some nurseries will ship plants, trees, etc. to "outside" markets. So it could be that a nursery say in North Carolina had most of their stock wiped out by the hurricane, but a landscaper needs a Crepe Myrtle for his landscape project...so he looks beyond his North Carolina boundaries.


I once ordered and bought a rose bush from Michigan to be shipped to my son in California, and our office plant vendors have been having a hard time getting healthy stock from THEIR vendors in the south, because of the hurricane.
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Old 12-03-2018, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Washington state
4,899 posts, read 2,448,691 times
Reputation: 14377
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post

When you move there you could try creating your own mini-microclimate just on your own property there with the types of plants/trees you select to grow on it.
I might end up doing that. I want some blue spruce and some apple, peach, and plum trees. Plus a couple others. We'll see what happens.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
Rodentraisser, I'm assuming you live in Pierce County, as I do.

Permaculturists experiment with sun spaces for marginally hardy plants. There's a famous photo of a lemon tree growing in the Alps. Granted, it didn't wasn't exactly bearing a bumper crop, but it was growing right out there in the open in the Alps. Can't find it right now, but here's the guy who was doing it - HOME

I met Sepp and his son a few years ago, a woman near Yelm had him come to the US and redesign her land. Sepp is not afraid of heavy machinery!

I still think most citrus will do better under cover in the PNW - it's not that some of them can't tolerate the cold, but the combo of drenching winter rains and minimal winter sun can really do them in.

I also know several people who are experimenting with growing olives commercially in the Willamette Valley and in the Seattle area. They will tell you that anyplace that can grow wine grapes can also grow olives. I remain a bit dubious, managing to grow a few plants for the challenge of it is not the same as growing commercially, but I am interested nevertheless!

Here are a couple of PNW nurseries who offer unusual fruits and are knowledgeable about permaculture methods -

https://onegreenworld.com

Raintree Nursery
Raintree Nursery was the one I was thinking of. I need to get down there someday.

No, I don't live in Pierce county. I live (or will live come spring) up above North Shore Road in Mason county. I almost bought a lot that was right on the edge overlooking the Hood Canal. The view was stupendous. But I'm too nervous about landslides, so I opted for something further inland. Of course, it's still the flat top of a hill, so you never know.
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Old 12-03-2018, 06:54 PM
 
12,456 posts, read 8,519,729 times
Reputation: 4077
2 make money honey.
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Old 12-04-2018, 07:11 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,477 posts, read 43,697,038 times
Reputation: 58842
Iím in coastal GA, and we see a lot of tropical plants in the garden centers, since were just north of FL. Although they cannot survive in the landscape as perennials, we see them used like annuals.
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Old 12-21-2018, 08:01 PM
Status: " Back to subarctic central indiana" (set 20 hours ago)
 
Location: Part time dual resident of 76131 and 46060
2,365 posts, read 1,669,681 times
Reputation: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by LKJ1988 View Post
2 make money honey.
Well thatís just cruel and absurd, who in the devil would sell plants like that, I guess this goes to show how cruel and greedy this world has become.
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