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Old 12-21-2018, 08:08 PM
Status: " Back to subarctic central indiana" (set 20 hours ago)
 
Location: Part time dual resident of 76131 and 46060
2,365 posts, read 1,669,681 times
Reputation: 779

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
I’m in coastal GA, and we see a lot of tropical plants in the garden centers, since were just north of FL. Although they cannot survive in the landscape as perennials, we see them used like annuals.
I am in the Indianapolis area, and yet I’ve known that many locally owned nurseries in central Indiana have been having “Cold Hardy” varieties of southern Magnolia trees such as Edith Bogue and Bracken’s Brown Beauty in stock for the past several years(since at least 2013, maybe even longer), I have even witnessed a few people replanting southern Magnolia trees after losing an unknown variety of southern Magnolia during the intense “Polar Vortex” winter of 2013/2014, so I suppose some people really don’t give up on growing exotic plants not usually seen in a given zone even after losing them from a landscape during an unusually harsh winter season.
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Old 12-21-2018, 08:53 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,354 posts, read 26,627,230 times
Reputation: 40393
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Well that’s just cruel and absurd, who in the devil would sell plants like that, I guess this goes to show how cruel and greedy this world has become.
You do have at least marginal responsibliity to know what you are buying. Since most people carry smart phones, it's possible to quickly look up that pretty plant if you don't know what it is.
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Old 12-23-2018, 04:49 PM
 
Location: North West Arkansas (zone 6b)
2,567 posts, read 1,805,691 times
Reputation: 3453
i've heard that the big box stores make lots of money selling tomatoes at the first sign of warmth knowing full well that the plants will die and the same customers will come back after the last frost date and buy again.

The simple answer is: they make money selling stuff that won't survive.

The slogan is 'Buyer beware', not 'buyer depends on the store to sell you exactly what you need and not what you want'
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Old 12-23-2018, 05:19 PM
 
12,456 posts, read 8,519,729 times
Reputation: 4077
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
Well that’s just cruel and absurd, who in the devil would sell plants like that, I guess this goes to show how cruel and greedy this world has become.
As the song goes. Money makes the world go around and dumb people plant stuff that is not up to the cold weather like they do in FL.
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Old 12-23-2018, 06:16 PM
 
4,802 posts, read 8,501,088 times
Reputation: 3473
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
You do have at least marginal responsibliity to know what you are buying. Since most people carry smart phones, it's possible to quickly look up that pretty plant if you don't know what it is.
You make a good point. How far should this “consumer protection bureau” business can go? People are crying for protection against “cruel and absurd” greedy business owners selling plants not suited to local zones, yet they complain they can’t buy what they want even if that’s outside range of their zone.

Be careful what you wish for. Otherwise you’ll have nanny States like California regulates what you can sell/ buy.
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Old 12-23-2018, 07:52 PM
 
609 posts, read 318,894 times
Reputation: 1473
Yes, there are a lot of people who buy foolishly. But there are also a lot of people who just have different circumstances--maybe they live in a microclimate. Maybe they have an indoor solarium or greenhouse. Maybe they are buying it as a gift for someone who lives in a warmer area. Maybe they are buying plants for a temporary installation (like a wedding reception or fundraiser). Not every other customer is foolish, and garden centers aren't being rude or predatory by selling to them.
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Old 12-30-2018, 12:25 PM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,477 posts, read 43,697,038 times
Reputation: 58842
Quote:
Originally Posted by gunslinger256 View Post
i've heard that the big box stores make lots of money selling tomatoes at the first sign of warmth knowing full well that the plants will die and the same customers will come back after the last frost date and buy again.

The simple answer is: they make money selling stuff that won't survive.

The slogan is 'Buyer beware', not 'buyer depends on the store to sell you exactly what you need and not what you want'
Except the big box stores have a generous return policy, so you could get your money back if that happens. I will be returning a dead shrub from last Feb before the deadline is up.
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Old 12-30-2018, 03:11 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
19,821 posts, read 13,057,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Except the big box stores have a generous return policy, so you could get your money back if that happens. I will be returning a dead shrub from last Feb before the deadline is up.
You can often do that with a shrub that does not flourish, or dies, if purchased from a local nursery. Before buying, ask about this. We got a replacement shrub from a local nursery once when the shrub sulked for a year. New shrub thrived.

Save your receipt when you buy a new, expensive shrub or tree.
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Old 12-30-2018, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
19,821 posts, read 13,057,123 times
Reputation: 26242
As a general answer to the OP, I think you can protect yourself if you know what your plant hardiness zone is. You could double check the hardiness zones of your purchase before planting. Take back what you think would not thrive, instead of planting.

But I have not had problems with this frankly.

We put in some new shrubs last fall, and our landscape guy told us that a couple of the shrubs might have problems with too much rain over our winters. THAT was a surprise. So, I guess some things at a nursery might be unsuited to the planting site. But sometimes you just have to try.

For a tree or big shrub that you want around for a long time, I think it is up to the customer to know the conditions of the planting site, and her hardiness zone, and the availability of water. Also, whether the site is shaded or open to sun. There are many factors which might affect a new planting.
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Old 12-31-2018, 05:37 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,477 posts, read 43,697,038 times
Reputation: 58842
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
As a general answer to the OP, I think you can protect yourself if you know what your plant hardiness zone is. You could double check the hardiness zones of your purchase before planting. Take back what you think would not thrive, instead of planting.

But I have not had problems with this frankly.

We put in some new shrubs last fall, and our landscape guy told us that a couple of the shrubs might have problems with too much rain over our winters. THAT was a surprise. So, I guess some things at a nursery might be unsuited to the planting site. But sometimes you just have to try.

For a tree or big shrub that you want around for a long time, I think it is up to the customer to know the conditions of the planting site, and her hardiness zone, and the availability of water. Also, whether the site is shaded or open to sun. There are many factors which might affect a new planting.
So true. We planted 5 Abelia in a row last spring. They are very pretty. Three are fine, one is dead, and one is iffy. Go figure. We used drip irrigation on them, and perhaps they got too much water.
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