U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-02-2019, 10:31 PM
 
193 posts, read 41,547 times
Reputation: 330

Advertisements

Why when buying pizzas or doughnuts for a large group of people do you always have to get a few that nobody likes that end up getting thrown out ?


Its the same answer. Variety.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-03-2019, 12:51 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,354 posts, read 26,627,230 times
Reputation: 40393
Quote:
Originally Posted by DirtBikeRider View Post
Why when buying pizzas or doughnuts for a large group of people do you always have to get a few that nobody likes that end up getting thrown out ?...........

Seriously off topic, but which donuts are the ones that no one likes? The ones with pink frosting?

I've never worked anywhere that was likely to have boxes of donuts. The people I worked with were locusts and if a box of donuts somehow appeared, a person could get injured by blocking the path to the donut box.

Pizza, though, with anchovies wouldn't have too many takers.

The nurseries sell what the buyers want. If you ask for a peach tree, they will sell it to you. It's not their job to tell you that you can't have what you want and it won't grow unless you have it in a greenhouse. For all they know, maybe you do have a greenhouse and know what you are doing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2019, 12:59 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
21,354 posts, read 26,627,230 times
Reputation: 40393
They sell a lot of orchids where I live. We have snow for months, but that doesn't stop the sale of lots of orchid plants.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2019, 02:04 AM
 
Location: S.W. British Columbia
6,379 posts, read 6,036,968 times
Reputation: 11557
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
They sell a lot of orchids where I live. We have snow for months, but that doesn't stop the sale of lots of orchid plants.

Oh wow, yes, you can say that again !!!

They are super popular here in Canada and can be found for sale by the hundreds any day of the year in supermarkets, department stores and plants stores everywhere, even in tiny corner grocery stores, little gift shops and hardware stores. Or they can be bought direct from the many commercial orchid nursery greenhouses here, there is such a big industry in them. Year round, but most especially in winter.

The further north you go, the more phalaenopsis (moth) orchids you'll see being sold in winter. They're the perfect houseplant, undemanding, easier to keep and maintain at ordinary room temperature than just about any other type of houseplant and they stay in bloom for a minimum of 4 - 5 months throughout the winter months then take a break then bloom for another 4 - 5 months again in summer. The older ones over 10 years old stay in bloom for up to 8 months before taking a 2 month rest. My three 20 year olds are giants that continue to bloom year round without taking any breaks. My windows are full of many moth orchid plants and they are all in bloom right now. What could be nicer than a cheerful rainbow of living flowers indoors to brighten up the house and dispel the short daylight gloom and darkness of winter for months and months and months?

.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-03-2019, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
2,181 posts, read 1,548,313 times
Reputation: 2164
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Because it gives people a variety and an opportunity to buy plants and flowers rather exotic to them and not commonly found. People like that. People want more than pansies, boxwood and junipers. Many gardeners enjoy a challenge and as previously mentioned, some people over winter some plants indoors or in green houses when they can including citrus, sweet smelling jasmine and other plants considered non hardy in many zones. No one is forcing anyone to buy these plants. Information is readily available on most plants found on tags giving planting zones or minimum temps these plants can survive and many people have their smart phones and just look them up before buying them.
Lowes is willing to take the loss if and when these non hardy plants are brought back because having a wider variety of plants available brings more people into their nurseries and stores. They aren't stupid. If it wasn't profitable they wouldn't do it.
You're 100% correct.

By the way, so there are no southern magnolias in Indianapolis? I don't know--but I've seen them in St. Louis.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2019, 07:59 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,477 posts, read 43,697,038 times
Reputation: 58842
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Lowes is willing to take the loss if and when these non hardy plants are brought back because having a wider variety of plants available brings more people into their nurseries and stores. They aren't stupid. If it wasn't profitable they wouldn't do it.
Lowe’s and Home Depot plants are contracted out. They make their money when a plant sells, and the nursery takes the loss if a plant comes back.

You are right about attracting people to the garden center. I’m incapable of leaving without a plant. I especially love to “save” perennials from the clearance rack.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2019, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,704 posts, read 10,952,440 times
Reputation: 10007
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Lowe’s and Home Depot plants are contracted out. They make their money when a plant sells, and the nursery takes the loss if a plant comes back.

You are right about attracting people to the garden center. I’m incapable of leaving without a plant. I especially love to “save” perennials from the clearance rack.
Much of this boils down to buyer beware. There are companies still trying to sell apple and pear trees, that are not blight resistant, where the fire blight is rampant. Or companies that want to sell Ash trees in areas affected by the emerald Ash borer. The only thing that will change these sales is if the public does not make anymore mistakes. In other words; we have to become more informed. No greenhouse will raise plants they cannot sell.

Last edited by fisheye; 01-06-2019 at 08:27 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2019, 08:34 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
35,477 posts, read 43,697,038 times
Reputation: 58842
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Much of this boils down to buyer beware. There are companies still trying to sell apple and pear trees, that are not blight resistant, where the fire blight is rampant. Or companies that want to sell Ash trees in areas affected by the emerald Ash borer. The only thing that will change these sales is if the public does not make anymore mistakes. In other words; we have to become more informed. No greenhouse will raise plants they cannot sell.
You are right, of course, but there is something about us gardeners that thinks we want to take a chance...The thrill of the challenge. On the other hand I have thoroughly checked out the suitability of a plant before buying it, only to have it die on me. I cannot get a beautiful delphinium to grow to save my life. Go figure.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-06-2019, 06:17 PM
Status: " Back to subarctic central indiana" (set 19 hours ago)
 
Location: Part time dual resident of 76131 and 46060
2,364 posts, read 1,669,681 times
Reputation: 779
Quote:
Originally Posted by DougStark View Post
You're 100% correct.

By the way, so there are no southern magnolias in Indianapolis? I don't know--but I've seen them in St. Louis.
Doug there are a few cold hardy varieties of southern magnolia trees growing through out the city limits, but I think that most have been planted in Indianapolis area since about the late 1990ís or early 2000ís; the first time I ever saw a southern magnolia tree was in a neighborhood back in 2003. I know there are likely dozens of hardy cultivars of southern magnolia(mostly Edith Bogue or Brackenís Brown Beauty) within Marion County but i doubt there were any around prior to the mid 90ís
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 09:35 AM
 
3,123 posts, read 4,268,741 times
Reputation: 4598
The house I have now came with a huge garden and when I go to buy a new plant I get frustrated with the plants that are not for my zone that are in abundance at the nurseries and stores. I prefer zone three even though “they” say I am in zone 4. But a lot of my zone 4 tries just die out quickly. It’s just frustrating to go to a nice nursery and be tempted by the majority of offerings there that won’t survive. I’ve kind of given up even buying anything new. There are hundreds of plants in my yard so I will learn to be satisfied with them and not try anything new. Just replace when I need to.

That said I always buy a couple of palm trees, hibiscus and gardenia for the deck every year. Then give them away because my cats would eat them. So I understand having the variety at the stores.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top