U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-13-2018, 06:34 PM
 
1,531 posts, read 829,919 times
Reputation: 610

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I think I have read that there hollies for every climate. We have enjoyed our two, which have quickly grown. They need at least one male to pollinate a single or several hollies. You are right. Their foliage is interesting to look at, and contrasts with needled evergreens. Our hollies here in S-W Washington State are a beautiful dark, glossy green.

well, you're pretty much correct---there are native evergreen hollies in the Canary Islands (ilex canariensis), Hawaii (i. anomala) Mexico and Central and South America, as well as in southern Africa (ilex mitis), Eurasia, and eastern North America for example OTOH, while many hollies grow well in the PNW (i.e. Oregon and Washington) and in fact sometimes too well as the "English Holly" (i. aquifolium) has been spread all over western parts of those areas due to birds spreading the seeds---there are NO native hollies to that area or any part of the far west.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 12-13-2018 at 07:30 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-18-2018, 01:58 PM
 
24,602 posts, read 18,117,104 times
Reputation: 13172
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moth View Post
I live in the DC area as well.

I have a Monkey Puzzle tree in my backyard. Bought a small one that barley reached a foot off of eBay about 10 years ago. It is nearly 10 feet tall now and doing quite well.

If you have the space, Redwoods and Sequoias do grow here.
ah. i was just about to suggest that. good thing i kept reading..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2018, 05:24 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,913 posts, read 11,049,730 times
Reputation: 10263
Dawn and Coastal redwoods are a possibility. But I read something about contaminating our Oaks with a disease? Also one would need some space.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-18-2018, 06:58 PM
 
1,531 posts, read 829,919 times
Reputation: 610
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Dawn and Coastal redwoods are a possibility. But I read something about contaminating our Oaks with a disease? Also one would need some space.


don't think "sudden oak death"/SODS in associated with redwoods specifically---so unless you are directly importing a plant (redwood or otherwise) from an infested area and potted up/growing in infected soil then there should be no problem---especially with nursery grown plants from un-infected areas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 07:52 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
13,913 posts, read 11,049,730 times
Reputation: 10263
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
don't think "sudden oak death"/SODS in associated with redwoods specifically---so unless you are directly importing a plant (redwood or otherwise) from an infested area and potted up/growing in infected soil then there should be no problem---especially with nursery grown plants from un-infected areas.
Thank you! I have been considering trying to grow one in my 6A. I have read many stories about how they will or will not survive on the East Coast. Supposedly the Dawn variety and Coastal varieties are hardier and the Dawn variety will or could survive in zone 5.

I also saw some comments that said even the nursery grown redwoods might still be able to pass on the SODS disease. So I am still trying to make head or tails out of whether or not to take a chance. I guess the best way is to contact the nursery. There are some grown on the East coast from Massachusetts through Virginia according to what I have seen online.

These trees are deciduous instead of evergreen. Many of us get them confused with evergreens.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Grosse Ile Michigan
25,467 posts, read 60,893,583 times
Reputation: 28347
My dad has some weeping spruce trees that are kind of neat because they are pretty different. Kind of creepy trees according to our kids. Zone 2-8
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 09:26 AM
 
11,568 posts, read 17,094,084 times
Reputation: 5713
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Thank you! I have been considering trying to grow one in my 6A. I have read many stories about how they will or will not survive on the East Coast. Supposedly the Dawn variety and Coastal varieties are hardier and the Dawn variety will or could survive in zone 5.

I also saw some comments that said even the nursery grown redwoods might still be able to pass on the SODS disease. So I am still trying to make head or tails out of whether or not to take a chance. I guess the best way is to contact the nursery. There are some grown on the East coast from Massachusetts through Virginia according to what I have seen online.

These trees are deciduous instead of evergreen. Many of us get them confused with evergreens.
There are Dawn Redwoods down the street from me in a park. They are indeed deciduous. Look somewhat like regular Redwoods until winter comes.

The National Arboretum has a grove of Coast Redwoods that seem to do fine. I have seen them in nurseries around here, but I already have two massive Hemlocks that came with the house.

When I was a kid, neighbors had a Sequoia, but took it down as it was way too close to their house.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-19-2018, 09:27 AM
 
1,531 posts, read 829,919 times
Reputation: 610
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Thank you! I have been considering trying to grow one in my 6A. I have read many stories about how they will or will not survive on the East Coast. Supposedly the Dawn variety and Coastal varieties are hardier and the Dawn variety will or could survive in zone 5.

I also saw some comments that said even the nursery grown redwoods might still be able to pass on the SODS disease. So I am still trying to make head or tails out of whether or not to take a chance. I guess the best way is to contact the nursery. There are some grown on the East coast from Massachusetts through Virginia according to what I have seen online.

These trees are deciduous instead of evergreen. Many of us get them confused with evergreens.

FWIW and IMHO, think the redwood is not a host (or alternate host) for the SODs pathogen, any disease would come from infected soil and on the west coast the various Dept. of Ag of Oregon, Washington, and California check on a regular basis all commercial nurseries that might have a chance of having the disease in their soil. when in doubt, contact the nursery and ask BEFORE you order and ask them directly.




as for the various kinds of "redwood" think the deciduous "dawn redwood"/metasequoia is probably the hardiest and best adapted to northern east coast conditions of hot, moist summers and periodic cold winters. the Sierra Redwood/sequoia giganteum is fairly hardy to cold but dislikes hot wet summers so careful siting is probably required in the DC area though if you can grow monkey puzzle it's worth a shot. coast redwood/sequoiadendron sembervirens is less cold hardy and also not especially happy with hot wet summers but some can be seen. both the western species need well-drained soil and a cool root run so mulching around the base and a part shade spot might help for young plants. the Asian species is much less finicky and actually likes a warm moist site.


hope this is of some help. good luck.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 12-19-2018 at 09:40 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2018, 09:10 AM
 
24,602 posts, read 18,117,104 times
Reputation: 13172
Quote:
Originally Posted by georgeinbandonoregon View Post
FWIW and IMHO, think the redwood is not a host (or alternate host) for the SODs pathogen, any disease would come from infected soil and on the west coast the various Dept. of Ag of Oregon, Washington, and California check on a regular basis all commercial nurseries that might have a chance of having the disease in their soil. when in doubt, contact the nursery and ask BEFORE you order and ask them directly.
unfortunately it is a host, but you are probably correct about contaminated soil potentially being a bigger threat.


First Report of Phytophthora ramorum on Coast Redwood in California. 2002.

and since we're talking about redwoods, this is pretty cool.


About a quarter of the new saplings were cloned from the Fieldbrook stump (pictured), a redwood that was roughly 400 feet tall and more than 3,000 years old when it was cut down in 1890. (Photo: Archangel Ancient Tree Archive)
Quote:
A new "super grove" of endangered coast redwood trees has arisen in California, thanks to a nonprofit group that planted 75 saplings at a park in San Francisco.

Since their species is endangered, any new community of coast redwoods would be welcome news. Yet these 75 saplings are also newsworthy for another reason: They're all clones, born of DNA that conservationists retrieved from ancient redwood stumps. Now growing together at the Presidio of San Francisco, they carry on a valuable genetic legacy that dates back thousands of years.
https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wi...od-tree-clones

https://www.ancienttreearchive.org/about-us/

Last edited by uggabugga; 12-20-2018 at 09:52 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-20-2018, 10:02 AM
 
1,531 posts, read 829,919 times
Reputation: 610
Quote:
Originally Posted by uggabugga View Post
unfortunately it is a host, but you are probably correct about contaminated soil potentially being a bigger threat.


First Report of Phytophthora ramorum on Coast Redwood in California. 2002.

and since we're talking about redwoods, this is pretty cool.


About a quarter of the new saplings were cloned from the Fieldbrook stump (pictured), a redwood that was roughly 400 feet tall and more than 3,000 years old when it was cut down in 1890. (Photo: Archangel Ancient Tree Archive)


https://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/wi...od-tree-clones

https://www.ancienttreearchive.org/about-us/



fair enough and thanks for sharing. AGAIN, if someone anywhere has concerns about the possibility of disease pathogens on nursery stock they absolutely should contact the nursery they intend to get the plant from and ask BEFORE they get it. many states have quarantine laws against a variety of pests and in fact some states will not accept importation of certain plants unless there is a certificate of inspection on the plants that certifies freedom from whatever pest or disease they are concerned with.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top